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Author Topic: Victorian food brands still extant  (Read 185570 times)
Mercury Wells
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« Reply #1350 on: September 26, 2018, 09:12:25 pm »

Pasta Garofalo 1789
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Oh...my old war wound? I got that at The Battle of Dorking. Very nasty affair that was, I can tell you.

The Ministry of Tea respectfully advises you to drink one cup of tea day...for that +5 Moral Fibre stat.
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« Reply #1351 on: September 27, 2018, 11:14:44 am »

"Pasta Garofalo has been considered the quality pasta par excellence since the twenty-year Fascist period."

That is a way of describing one's products that I haven't come across before... Smiley

Not one for the right wing Italian list then.

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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #1352 on: September 27, 2018, 05:05:49 pm »

"Pasta Garofalo has been considered the quality pasta par excellence since the twenty-year Fascist period."

That is a way of describing one's products that I haven't come across before... Smiley

Not one for the right wing Italian list then.



Nope. Self censored. I was going to make a funny comment, but just realised it's not funny given where this world is headed.
« Last Edit: September 27, 2018, 05:08:54 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged

yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #1353 on: October 01, 2018, 03:07:17 pm »

I think we have Crabbies Ginger Wine already, 1801, but we may not have the Ginger Beer yet. Adding it now to the Empire list. None of those vile artificial sweeteners.

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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #1354 on: October 02, 2018, 03:52:30 am »

I think we have Crabbies Ginger Wine already, 1801, but we may not have the Ginger Beer yet. Adding it now to the Empire list. None of those vile artificial sweeteners.



That looks good right about now!
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Mercury Wells
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I insiste that you do call me WELLS. :)


« Reply #1355 on: October 31, 2018, 04:21:45 am »

Has anyone got info. about the earliest makers/suppliers of Japanese Curry/Katsu. Which was introduced by The British Navy during The Meiji Period

The earliest Coy. I can find is:- House Foods Est. 1913 (selling "Curry/Katsu" 1926).
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« Reply #1356 on: October 31, 2018, 08:47:43 pm »

Has anyone got info. about the earliest makers/suppliers of Japanese Curry/Katsu. Which was introduced by The British Navy during The Meiji Period

The earliest Coy. I can find is:- House Foods Est. 1913 (selling "Curry/Katsu" 1926).

That is very interesting that curry is a British influence in Japan during the Meiji period. That makes it a very recent addition to Japanese cuisine. Perhaps the first brand is solidly Edwardian in period. The first powder form would be S&B brand from 1926 as you say. Would the curry exist in another form like in a jar or concentrate paste, since it's so different to Indian curry? Paste and semi dry powder is possible in Indian Curry and Mexican Mole, but Japanese curry is more of a roux made with flower and powder from what your link shows.
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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #1357 on: November 03, 2018, 02:22:00 am »

Has anyone got info. about the earliest makers/suppliers of Japanese Curry/Katsu. Which was introduced by The British Navy during The Meiji Period

The earliest Coy. I can find is:- House Foods Est. 1913 (selling "Curry/Katsu" 1926).

  Your query sent me on an intriguing journey.  I hadn't been aware Japan had a specialised curry.

Here is  an interesting  story of how Japan got its curry

https://taiken.co/single/the-origin-and-history-of-japanese-curry-rice

This piece takes it back even further  to the 1850s

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/life/2011/08/26/food/curry-its-more-japanese-than-you-think/#.W9zshRirE0M


 Another take on the quandry

https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2016/04/08/473376519/from-india-to-north-korea-via-japan-currys-global-journey



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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #1358 on: November 03, 2018, 02:25:49 am »

Has anyone got info. about the earliest makers/suppliers of Japanese Curry/Katsu. Which was introduced by The British Navy during The Meiji Period

The earliest Coy. I can find is:- House Foods Est. 1913 (selling "Curry/Katsu" 1926).

That is very interesting that curry is a British influence in Japan during the Meiji period. That makes it a very recent addition to Japanese cuisine. Perhaps the first brand is solidly Edwardian in period. The first powder form would be S&B brand from 1926 as you say. Would the curry exist in another form like in a jar or concentrate paste, since it's so different to Indian curry? Paste and semi dry powder is possible in Indian Curry and Mexican Mole, but Japanese curry is more of a roux made with flower and powder from what your link shows.

 Its an interesting turn, that  traditional South / Central American ingredients have become staple in curries  in India and other parts of the former Empire. Potato, chili, tomatoes,  pumpkin   and more
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« Reply #1359 on: November 03, 2018, 08:39:50 am »

Has anyone got info. about the earliest makers/suppliers of Japanese Curry/Katsu. Which was introduced by The British Navy during The Meiji Period

The earliest Coy. I can find is:- House Foods Est. 1913 (selling "Curry/Katsu" 1926).


That is very interesting that curry is a British influence in Japan during the Meiji period. That makes it a very recent addition to Japanese cuisine. Perhaps the first brand is solidly Edwardian in period. The first powder form would be S&B brand from 1926 as you say. Would the curry exist in another form like in a jar or concentrate paste, since it's so different to Indian curry? Paste and semi dry powder is possible in Indian Curry and Mexican Mole, but Japanese curry is more of a roux made with flower and powder from what your link shows.


 Its an interesting turn, that  traditional South / Central American ingredients have become staple in curries  in India and other parts of the former Empire. Potato, chili, tomatoes,  pumpkin   and more


That, dear Annie, is the doing of the Spanish and Portuguese Empires. Mexico became the most important part of the Spanish territories in the Americas, because the overland route from Veracruz to Acapulco was the way goods from Europe could flow to Asia and goods from Asia could flow to Europe. It took a great while for Europeans to trust the potato, but spices were something that Europeans readily accepted. Chile Pepper powders traveled the globe. Sweet Paprika became a staple in Central Europe and elsewhere, and I suspect that the some of the Native Mexican moles, with their myriad ingredients including toasted nuts, seeds and chile powder somehow inspired mid and far Asian curries...

Of course, this is horrible hearsay in the ears of East Indians. Them fighting words enough to start the "Pepper Wars" of the 22nd Century, where mankind is nearly eradicated by the conflict between an culinarily offended India and an acertive Mexico protecting ancient patrimony! The weapon of choice will not be nuclear weapons but rather ever more potent Chile peppers, like the "Guatemalan Insanity Pepper of Quetzalacatenango"* in the Giga-Scoville scale capable gassing entire countries with a single pepper pod.

*Ref. The Simpsons http://simpsons.wikia.com/wiki/Guatemalan_Insanity_Pepper
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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #1360 on: November 03, 2018, 12:38:57 pm »



 Mr Wilhelm with out Mexico we would be lost. The European and Asian diets have stolen so much from South  America, its hard to even know what our ancestors ate  before  befor the 1500s. A lot of rolled oats  and dried pork  by the sounds. With the occasional sea bird.  Pizza isn't Italian. The New Zealand sweet potato Kumara, is not native, it came from South America centuries ago with the Polynesian who settled here 1st.

 
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Mercury Wells
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I insiste that you do call me WELLS. :)


« Reply #1361 on: November 03, 2018, 08:07:04 pm »


Your query sent me on an intriguing journey.  I hadn't been aware Japan had a specialised curry.

Here is  an interesting  story of how Japan got its curry

https://taiken.co/single/the-origin-and-history-of-japanese-curry-rice

For some reason, the link provided doesn't work. All I get is "problem loading page".
« Last Edit: December 06, 2018, 02:54:25 am by Mercury Wells » Logged
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« Reply #1362 on: November 03, 2018, 08:42:00 pm »


Your query sent me on an intriguing journey.  I hadn't been aware Japan had a specialised curry.

Here is  an interesting  story of how Japan got its curry

https://taiken.co/single/the-origin-and-history-of-japanese-curry-rice

For some reason, the link provided doesn't work. All I get is "problem loading page".
I get server timeout. That means the taiken.co address is valid, but the site is down for some reason. Try again later.
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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #1363 on: November 03, 2018, 11:20:35 pm »


Your query sent me on an intriguing journey.  I hadn't been aware Japan had a specialised curry.

Here is  an interesting  story of how Japan got its curry

https://taiken.co/single/the-origin-and-history-of-japanese-curry-rice

For some reason, the link provided doesn't work. All I get is "problem loading page".

Its a more in depth story of the Meijii  period
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Mercury Wells
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I insiste that you do call me WELLS. :)


« Reply #1364 on: December 05, 2018, 03:27:55 am »

A Brief History of Marmite (video).
Enjoy and remember to spread thinly.  Wink
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #1365 on: December 05, 2018, 09:41:38 pm »

A Brief History of Marmite (video).
Enjoy and remember to spread thinly.  Wink

You just reminded me of an old Spanish saying (perhaps not Spanish, but I never heard it in the English speaking world):

"To properly season a salad, you need a reasonable person to shake the salt, a spendthrift to pour the oil, and a scrooge to pour the vinegar."
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Mercury Wells
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I insiste that you do call me WELLS. :)


« Reply #1366 on: December 06, 2018, 02:52:36 am »


Your query sent me on an intriguing journey.  I hadn't been aware Japan had a specialised curry.

Here is  an interesting  story of how Japan got its curry

https://taiken.co/single/the-origin-and-history-of-japanese-curry-rice

For some reason, the link provided doesn't work. All I get is "problem loading page".

The link works now.  Grin

Anyway on to a different type of food:- "Grits", what was the 1st company to make & sell instant grits. All I can find is the "Aunt Jemima" brand.
« Last Edit: December 06, 2018, 02:55:26 am by Mercury Wells » Logged
yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #1367 on: December 06, 2018, 03:11:12 am »

What is "grits" ?
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Mercury Wells
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« Reply #1368 on: December 06, 2018, 03:49:30 am »

What is "grits" ?

Grits

Quote
Grits is a food made from corn (maize) that is ground into a coarse meal and then boiled. Hominy grits is a type of grits made from hominy, corn that has been treated with an alkali in a process called nixtamalization with the cereal germ removed. Grits is often served with other flavorings[1] as a breakfast dish, usually savory. The dish originated in the Southern United States but now is available nationwide, and is popular as the dinner entrée shrimp and grits, served primarily in the South.[1] Grits should not be confused with boiled ground corn, which makes "hasty pudding" or "mush" or may be made into polenta using coarse ground corn, or with the "mush" made from more finely ground corn meal.

Grits is of Native American origin and is similar to other thick maize-based porridges from around the world, such as polenta and mieliepap. The word "grits" is derived from the Old English word "grytt," meaning coarse meal.[2]

« Last Edit: December 06, 2018, 03:57:37 am by Mercury Wells » Logged
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #1369 on: December 06, 2018, 09:27:39 pm »

What is "grits" ?

Think of it as American Polenta porridge for breakfast. It's grainy, chalky and virtually has no taste save for whatever you put on it (butter, etc). I hate it. The only saving grace is that it is actually made from nixtamalised corn (Hominy a/k/a Nixtamal), meaning that like in Native American products made from maize like tortillas, it has been properly boiled in lime water to release the Niacin, Vitamin B12 and the added nurtritional content of calcium carbonate (otherwise it's just like Italian polenta which is more deficient nutritionally).
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« Reply #1370 on: December 07, 2018, 02:36:56 am »

Righto. I get it now. Mieliepap I am familiar with in South Africa - horrid stuff. Grits hmmmm.
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« Reply #1371 on: December 08, 2018, 01:51:10 am »

Righto. I get it now. Mieliepap I am familiar with in South Africa - horrid stuff. Grits hmmmm.

Mielepap would be not much worse than Grits, I'm afraid. Mielepap - Even the name is not appetising. Sounds more like a medical procedure! "The doctor said you needed to go for your annual Mielepap."  Cheesy

Sad to see that un-nixtamalised maize became the staple food to replace sorghum in Africa. That is truly a dis-service to people who can only afford to eat maize. It took hundreds of years for Western people (until the 1930s or so, by the United States Department of Agriculture?), to figure out that the mysterious illness (Pelagra) that affected poor US farmers in the 20th C and poor Italian farmers in the 19th C was due to a severe deficiency of Vitamin B12 and Niacin, due to the use of un-nixtamalised corn as their main diet.

Current consumption of milled maize in the US is based on what is called Polenta in Europe, to make "Corn Bread" (should really be called "Corn Cake," instead) and Italian style Polenta dishes (besides the "Fritos" hyper-salted corn snacks); however, modern "Corn Meal" is fortified with vitamins, and is never the sole source of nutrients, and often is combined with wheat flour and baking soda to make corn bread.

But in an apocalyptic famine scenario, only those who know how to Nixtamalise maize would be able to remain healthy.
« Last Edit: December 08, 2018, 02:30:43 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #1372 on: December 08, 2018, 02:19:07 am »

Anyway on to a different type of food:- "Grits", what was the 1st company to make & sell instant grits. All I can find is the "Aunt Jemima" brand.

Grits is thought of as a Southern food in the US. Basically a variation of Hominy and together with boiled peanuts it's one of those dishes that was popular in a rural economy to feed the poor. However, experts contest the origin and it is said to be Native American in origin, imported by European settlers much earlier, probably in the 17th C Northeast, and that makes a lot of sense, due to the presence of Nixtamalisation in it's preparation (which in North America would be done with an alkaline solution made from wood ash mixed in water as opposed to lye from limewater like among Mesoamerican Natives). Also note Hominy was originally a Powhatan native word.

It might be difficult to find the first brand, but I think perhaps, some large company based in the East/Northeast of the United States, like Quaker Oats Co. (already in the list) would have been the first to start preparing "instant grits." Quaker brand instant-grits are sold today in supermarkets. Basically it's like a coarse ground version of Mexican Masa but with the kernel hulls removed (and hence a bit whiter than Masa in appearance - similar to white rice vs brown rice). Not my favourite food (the hull of maize does carry some much needed flavour and fibre), so I don't know much else about it either.
« Last Edit: December 08, 2018, 02:40:40 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Mercury Wells
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« Reply #1373 on: December 30, 2018, 12:32:34 pm »

For the US:- Gorton's Seafood 1849
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« Reply #1374 on: December 30, 2018, 01:57:45 pm »

"Gorton’s the very first to develop a frozen convenience food" - so proud to say that in their first explanatory sentence... they are aiming low.
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