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Author Topic: Victorian food brands still extant  (Read 166770 times)
Banfili
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« Reply #1250 on: January 24, 2018, 09:04:37 am »

Apropos of nothing much, but the iconic Violet Crumble, an absolutely delicious chocolate covered honeycomb is back in Australian hands, the recipe and rights having been bought back by a South Australian manufacturer.
It started life as Cadbury's.
« Last Edit: January 25, 2018, 12:40:20 am by Banfili » Logged
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« Reply #1251 on: January 24, 2018, 11:16:02 pm »

Apropos of nothing much, but the iconic Violet Crumble, an absolutely delicious chocolate covered honeycomb is back in Australian Hands, the recipe and rights having been bought by a South Australian manufacturer.
It started life as Cadbury's.

Sounds to me like "sea foam" / "sponge" candy sold at fairs in the US, or according to wiki, "Karumeyaki" sold at festivals in Japan. Commercially I can't think of anything except "Whoppers" malted milk balls from 1949 onwards.

But since Violet Crumble got its start in 1913, I think it falls outside of the time period altogether.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Violet_Crumble

Quote
Abel Hoadley (born 10 September 1844, died 12 May 1918)[3] opened a jam factory in South Melbourne, Victoria, in 1889, trading as A. Hoadley & Company. By 1895, business had expanded rapidly and Hoadley built a five-storey premises, the Rising Sun Preserving Works. He produced jams, jellies, fruit preserves, candied peels, sauces, and confectionery and employed a workforce as large as 200. By 1901, there were four preserving factories and a large confectionery works. Hoadley had acquired the firm of Dillon, Burrows & Co. and extended his products to vinegar, cocoa, and chocolate. In 1910, the jam business was sold to Henry Jones Co-operative Ltd. and in 1913, Hoadley's Chocolates Ltd was formed.

The same year, Hoadley produced his first chocolate assortment and packed them in a purple box decorated with violets. The packaging was in tribute to his wife's favorite colour (purple) and favorite flower (violets). Within the box assortment was a piece of honeycomb that became so popular that Hoadley decided to produce an individual honeycomb bar.
This proved trickier than first thought, because as the pieces of honeycomb cooled, they absorbed moisture and started sticking together. This hygroscopic nature of honeycomb led Hoadley to eventually dip his bars in chocolate, to keep the honeycomb dry and crunchy. Thus, in 1913, the Violet Crumble bar was created.

Hoadley wanted to call his new bar just Crumble, but learned that it was not possible to protect the name with a trademark. He thought of his wife (Susannah Ann née Barrett) and her favourite flower, the violet, and registered the name Violet Crumble, using a purple wrapper with a small flower logo. It was an instant success. Violet Crumbles are crispier in texture than Crunchie bars, with a slightly more marshmallow taste.
« Last Edit: January 24, 2018, 11:20:44 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged

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« Reply #1252 on: February 02, 2018, 03:29:33 pm »

Moores Biscuits 1880

They make a savoury biscuit called "The Dorset Knob"

[Edit] Ponti est 1867 [/Edit]

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« Reply #1253 on: February 02, 2018, 07:18:05 pm »

Moores Biscuits 1880

They make a savoury biscuit called "The Dorset Knob"

[Edit] Ponti est 1867 [/Edit]


Very good.
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« Reply #1254 on: February 10, 2018, 06:02:36 pm »

For the European list, we have Italian Espresson Coffee:

Lavazza Coffee (Luigi Lavazza S. p. A. Founded in Turin, Italy in 1895 by Luigi Lavazza)

Not terribly well documented on the Internet, Luigi Lavazza S. p. A. was founded in 1895 by the same family that runs it today. With an annual revenue of €1.47 billion (2015), Lavazza claim to dominate over 75% of the houshold coffee market in Italy. They are known for their promotion calendars featuring high fashion models.

Lavazza advertising poster. Transport of Coffee in Indochina.


Good and strong. But not as strong as our own "Houston Blend" coffee at HEB supermarkets. "Strong hydrocarbon body, with mellow notes of ammonium perchlorate and a hint of swamp."  Grin

« Last Edit: February 10, 2018, 06:08:24 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #1255 on: February 10, 2018, 07:13:32 pm »

"Strong hydrocarbon body, with mellow notes of ammonium perchlorate and a hint of swamp"

I'm not sold.
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« Reply #1256 on: February 10, 2018, 09:22:23 pm »

"Strong hydrocarbon body, with mellow notes of ammonium perchlorate and a hint of swamp"

I'm not sold.

Engineers swear by it. They claim it has a very high energy density. They advice not drink it in the vicinity of flames.
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« Reply #1257 on: February 10, 2018, 11:01:47 pm »

"Strong hydrocarbon body, with mellow notes of ammonium perchlorate and a hint of swamp"

I'm not sold.

Engineers swear by it. … They advice not drink it in the vicinity of flames.
That's no good for me, then.

Personally, I'm partial to fresh-ground Cherenkov Blue Mountain, for that early-morning explosion of energy. It's had glowing reviews!
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« Reply #1258 on: February 11, 2018, 02:40:10 am »

Doh!
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« Reply #1259 on: February 11, 2018, 04:02:11 am »

"Strong hydrocarbon body, with mellow notes of ammonium perchlorate and a hint of swamp"

I'm not sold.

Engineers swear by it. … They advice not drink it in the vicinity of flames.
That's no good for me, then.

Personally, I'm partial to fresh-ground Cherenkov Blue Mountain, for that early-morning explosion of energy. It's had glowing reviews!

Personally I find the taste of Cherenkov Blue MountainTM to be a bit shocking. And not to diffract from the issue, but I prefer the taste of chicory. Let's phase it, chicory is not quite as superluminal, but its taste is smother than Blue MountainTM, and it doesn't leave plutonium shavings in my mouth (always a plus). I think I'll just stick to hydrocarbons.

Doh!

I'M SORRY UNCLE BERT, I COULDN'T RESIST THE CHALLENGE. I'M A GEEK AT HEART! Cheesy
« Last Edit: February 11, 2018, 04:18:06 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #1260 on: February 11, 2018, 06:44:00 pm »

Back to the brands, not back to the future.
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« Reply #1261 on: February 12, 2018, 09:32:19 am »

Back to the brands, not back to the future.


Indeed. Here's an unexpected cheese coming from America:

Marin French Cheese Co. makers of Rouge et Noir "Breakfast Cheese," Brie and Camembert style cheese  (Originally selling an unripened Brie under the brand name Rouge et Noir, the Marin French Cheese Company was founded in 1865 in Petaluma California by Jefferson Thompson)

http://www.marinfrenchcheese.com/

The Marin French Cheese Company, originally marketing cheese under the brand name "Rouge et Noir" was founded right at the end of the American Civil War, in 1865 by Jefferson Thompson on Petaluma, California. The company continued to be operated by the family for 133 years thereafter. Their original product, produced at the "West Marin Dairy Farm" was a "Breakfast Cheese," which was soon followed by traditional French style ripened Brie and Camembert style cheeses.

The original Breakfast Cheese is an unripened type of Brie cheese which was only developed by this company, so technically it is a Californian American cheese. In 2015 a new type of derivative was developed called a "Petite Braekfast" cheese, made by adding fresh cream




Quote
Marin French Breakfast Cheese is a California original – a fresh unripened Brie made in our Marin creamery since the late 1800’s. We put Breakfast Cheese on San Francisco’s saloon menus back in the days when men grabbed salted meat, pickled eggs and a mug of steam beer before heading to the docks to unload cargo from around the world. We’ve made Breakfast Cheese for over 100 years. It’s that good!

At Marin French we honor tradition but we’re not afraid to break with it. We’re just as crazy for innovation. For today’s savvy cheese lover we added a dollop of cream to Breakfast Cheese, fluffed it to 4 ounces and renamed it Petite Breakfast. It’s a fresh expression of our sweet local milk and cream, captures the essence of cool coastal breezes rolling over our Petaluma creamery and satisfies a craving for creamy, tangy fresh cheese with morning toast or evening cocktails.

In 2015 Petite Breakfast will wear the commemorative vintage label, “1865” to celebrate our 150th year and honor our cheesemakers who sustained the craft over decades. 1865 will be available in our creamery retail shop and at special promotions nationally through the year.
At Marin French we’re passionate about cheesemaking. We continue our tradition with an unrelenting commitment to creating authentic, approachable, artisan cheese.


It looks like the "Central Market" branch of our HEB chain of supermarkets carries this cheese for $7 / 4Oz, about twice the price of regular Bries. To be honest, if I want to eat Brie, I only need to go to my local HEB and buy "Ile de France" brand cheese for $5/4.5 Oz (which I've consumed many times), but that is the traditional Brie - I'd be rather interested to see what the difference is between this unripened "Petite Breakfast" and Brie is, given that it has an extra content of cream and will be less pungent. I don't know if it's worth the bus trip though...

https://www.heb.com/product-detail/rouge-et-noir-petite-creme-triple-marin-french/1952423
https://www.heb.com/product-detail/ile-de-france-brie/2121332
« Last Edit: February 12, 2018, 09:56:23 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #1262 on: February 12, 2018, 10:43:59 am »

All cheese is worth the trip even though it may only be to find that it wasn't worth it.
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« Reply #1263 on: February 12, 2018, 09:01:04 pm »

All cheese is worth the trip even though it may only be to find that it wasn't worth it.

I'll keep that in mind.

Here's some more photos from my morning run in the supermarket... For the European List:

Castello "Danablu" Danish Style Blue Cheese (The Castello brand was founded in 1893 by Rasmus Tholstrup in Denmark - unknown location)

Castello makes a triple cream Bleu Cheese. Not tremendously well documented, but here's the website:
https://www.castellocheese.com/en-us/the-story/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Castello_cheeses



~ ~ ~

This one was already included for the Empire list (origin, Scotland):

Dundee Orange Marmalade (1797)

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« Reply #1264 on: February 13, 2018, 12:34:32 am »

I don't know if it quite counts because it's a a medicine. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bromo-Seltzer Wikipedia doesn't give a date for the invention of Bromo-Seltzer, but has a photo of a horse-drawn delivery wagon used by the company. Wikipedia refers to the product in the past tense, but you can still buy it on Amazon.

The fizzing component of the product became the basis of the candy product Fizzies; tablets that fizz like Alka-Seltzer and turn water into a weak tasting slightly carbonated soft drink.
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« Reply #1265 on: February 13, 2018, 05:48:48 am »

I don't know if it quite counts because it's a a medicine. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bromo-Seltzer Wikipedia doesn't give a date for the invention of Bromo-Seltzer, but has a photo of a horse-drawn delivery wagon used by the company. Wikipedia refers to the product in the past tense, but you can still buy it on Amazon.

The fizzing component of the product became the basis of the candy product Fizzies; tablets that fizz like Alka-Seltzer and turn water into a weak tasting slightly carbonated soft drink.

I'm afraid that falls under the definition of medicine. We don't have a list for that yet. There is another thread that was started for general non food brands, but the list was abandoned....

All cheese is worth the trip even though it may only be to find that it wasn't worth it.

I found both Petit Breakfast and Castello at my local super. But the Petit breakfast is... Shall we say, very Petite ? $6 for 4Oz.  Nope. Not doing that. The cheese looks relatively firm, like fresh cheese, and not gooey with a rhind like regular Brie. The Castello on the other hand looks really good.
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« Reply #1266 on: February 13, 2018, 09:15:56 pm »

Another one for the American list. This one comes from Nashville Tennessee. It's a traditional Southern food, but made by an Italian family in the land of Country and Western... Almost no information I can see on the net other than their single paragraph on their website. Always makes me nervous when somebody makes a claim of "Since 18xx." since it could mean anything  Undecided They were purchased recently by the Dutch company, Zwanenberg Food Group (which probably explains why there is no information in their website - once purchased by a larger company the history of small brand names tends to be erased, depending on the corporate culture of said company). They own a whole bunch of brands that may be localised to specific geographical regions within the United States: Dutch Colony, Bristol, American Pride, Prem, Barnegat Bay, none of which I've ever heard from.


Vietti Baked Beans (Part of Zwanenberg Food Group, Vietti Foods is a maker of canned baked beans, chili con carne and pork in BBQ sauce. Founded in 1898, Nashville Tennesse)

https://www.viettifoods.com/about/
« Last Edit: February 13, 2018, 09:17:35 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #1267 on: February 13, 2018, 10:29:25 pm »

They own a whole bunch of brands


I don't think brands come in bunches, I tend to think of anything gathered in bunches as being tied up with string. If you can't tie it up in string then it can't be in a bunch. I think you need a more appropriate collective noun for a group of brands.

http://users.tinyonline.co.uk/gswithenbank/collnoun.htm#Miscellaneous
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« Reply #1268 on: February 13, 2018, 10:46:16 pm »

They own a whole bunch of brands

I don't think brands come in bunches, I tend to think of anything gathered in bunches as being tied up with string. If you can't tie it up in string then it can't be in a bunch. I think you need a more appropriate collective noun for a group of brands.

Well it's not a pride of companies. Nor a roockery, herd, brook, swarm or litter... Covey, pod, romp, wreck, bevy or muster will not fit either.  I hear corporations are now treated as people for tax (evasion) and legal (mischief) purposes.  So what about Colony? Team perhaps? Oh.. I've got it. This one fits nicely: Gang.

"They own a whole gang of brands that may be localised to specific geographical regions within the United States."

Sounds about right. Rather fitting don't you think? Grin
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« Reply #1269 on: February 14, 2018, 07:29:56 am »

Back to the brands, not back to the future.


*Nasally voice due to the fact that the reader is holding his nose*

I bet you don't have this one particular brand in your list. Found at my local HEB supermarket,

Quote
From humble beginnings as farmhouse cheese makers, the Tuxford & Tebbutt creamery was formed in 1780 in Melton Mowbray. Today, whilst the creamery has certainly kept pace with the times to satisfy demand, Tuxford & Tebbutt still makes its award winning cheeses from the same building in the same time honoured way.

Tuxford & Tebbutt is famed as one of only six creameries in the world permitted to make Blue Stilton – the ‘King of English Cheeses’.


Tuxford & Tebbutt Stilton Cheese (Purveyor of Stilton and Leicester Cheese. Now part of Arla Group, Tuxford & Tebbutt Creamery was founded in Melton Mowbray, Leicestershire, UK in 1780)

http://www.arlacheese.co.uk/creamery/tuxford-tebbutt/


~ ~ ~

I'm not so sure about this....  Roll Eyes

From Wiki https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stilton_cheese

Quote
The first known written reference to Stilton cheese appeared in William Stukeley's Itinerarium Curiosum, Letter V, dated October 1722. Daniel Defoe in his 1724 work A tour thro' the whole island of Great Britain notes, "We pass'd Stilton, a town famous for cheese, which is call'd our English Parmesan, and is brought to table with the mites, or maggots round it, so thick, that they bring a spoon with them for you to eat the mites with, as you do the cheese."


 Tongue

Is this like the myth about the Maguey plant (Blue Agave) worm in the Tequila bottle? Because the worm thing is a myth that was turned into reality by crafty marketers... I can't bring myself to eating a spoonful of maggots with my slice of cheese.

~ ~ ~

And from across the Channel, I also found this at the same supermarket:

Wiki https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Port_Salut

Quote
Port Salut is a semi-soft pasteurised cow's milk cheese from Pays de la Loire, France, with a distinctive orange rind and a mild flavour. The cheese is produced in wheels approximately 23 cm (9 inches) in diameter, weighing approximately 2 kg (4.4 lb).
Though Port Salut has a mild flavour, it sometimes has a strong smell because it is a mature cheese. The smell increases the longer the cheese is kept — this however does not affect its flavour. It can be refrigerated and is best eaten within two weeks of opening.
The cheese was developed by Trappist monks during the 19th century at Port-du-Salut Abbey in Entrammes.[1] The monks, many of whom had left France during the French revolution of 1789, learned cheese-making skills to support themselves abroad, and brought those skills back upon their return after the Bourbon Restoration. The name of their society, "Société Anonyme des Fermiers Réunis" (S.A.F.R.), later became their registered trademark, and is still printed on the wheels of Port Salut cheese.


Port Salut Cheese (Originally made in 1816 by monks at the "Société Anonyme des Fermiers Réunis" which was founded at the Port-du-Salut Abbey in Entrammes, Mayenne, France)


Cheers,

JW

PS On the topic of stinky cheeses, I'll leave this list of the top 17 stinkier cheeses for your amusement:

https://www.mnn.com/food/healthy-eating/stories/17-top-stinky-cheeses
« Last Edit: February 14, 2018, 07:45:15 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #1270 on: February 14, 2018, 09:48:26 am »

Port Salut fits the bill for the European list, a fairly bland soft-ish cheese, pleasant enough without being stimulating. We have a stilton or two on the list and I have tried the one you mention though I may have forgotten to add it to the list, I would need to check. Nice to know you can get stilton over the pond. Another reason for the trip.

Stilton used to be much more live than it is today. You will find none of that sort of insect life in a modern Stilton. All looked after in strenuously clean production methods, in fact too clean as some of the life has gone from modern Stilton. Modern Stilton no longer matures in the way that Stilton did before, now being made of largely pasteurised ingredients to kill any trace of listeria. I prefer ripe and alive cheese and a good live Stilton is hard to find. Still really worth buying and tasting though with a glass of Dow's Vintage port. No need to hold your nose. Stilton is a way of life over this side of the pond, for many.

Back to the insects, there are still cheeses served like that today, I believe in Turkey where the maggots process the food to make it more smooth and flavoursome. You can choose to eat the maggots or not, supposedly they taste of cheese. The bacteria in all cheeses is of the same variety that is found on a particularly smelly pair of feet so next time you notice the similarity, remember the connection is more than just smell.

« Last Edit: February 14, 2018, 09:53:08 am by yereverluvinunclebert » Logged
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« Reply #1271 on: February 14, 2018, 10:40:59 am »

Port Salut fits the bill for the European list, a fairly bland soft-ish cheese, pleasant enough without being stimulating. We have a stilton or two on the list and I have tried the one you mention though I may have forgotten to add it to the list, I would need to check. Nice to know you can get stilton over the pond. Another reason for the trip.

Stilton used to be much more live than it is today. You will find none of that sort of insect life in a modern Stilton. All looked after in strenuously clean production methods, in fact too clean as some of the life has gone from modern Stilton. Modern Stilton no longer matures in the way that Stilton did before, now being made of largely pasteurised ingredients to kill any trace of listeria. I prefer ripe and alive cheese and a good live Stilton is hard to find. Still really worth buying and tasting though with a glass of Dow's Vintage port. No need to hold your nose. Stilton is a way of life over this side of the pond, for many.

Back to the insects, there are still cheeses served like that today, I believe in Turkey where the maggots process the food to make it more smooth and flavoursome. You can choose to eat the maggots or not, supposedly they taste of cheese. The bacteria in all cheeses is of the same variety that is found on a particularly smelly pair of feet so next time you notice the similarity, remember the connection is more than just smell.



You're more than welcome to cross the pond! And be welcome in the Lone Star State, if you can stand the weather, that is  Grin However, we have enjoyed a nice long winter this year, which makes me believe we'll have moderate temperatures past April. March and October-November are usually the mildest months, not too cold, not too hot. Plus you'll find the SXSW festival in early March, which is a great way to go pub crawling.

I'm surprised I'm still finding more Victorian era brands. Partly it's because my local HEB super keeps adding more products every year, and partly because now I'm obliged to pass by a second HEB on my way to work - the contents of the shelves in the same chain of supermarkets vary from one area to another in the city, as they cater to different buyers, like students or an international clientèle. There are many more European brands to find, I'm sure.

If I had a car I'd make more frequent trips to the "Whole Foods" supermarkets (the chain was founded in Austin, and after becoming a national phenomenon, they just got purchased by Amazon - who sliced prices in half). These types of stores specialise in organic products, but also cater to the hipster and the foodie crowd by offering expensive imported brands. The HEB "Central Market" is meant to be a competitor, and it is heavily stacked with fresh food and imported foods which differ significantly from those of their regular supermarkets.
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« Reply #1272 on: February 14, 2018, 04:02:22 pm »

What is this "HEB" of which you speak earthman?
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« Reply #1273 on: February 14, 2018, 09:16:20 pm »

What is this "HEB" of which you speak earthman?


Ah! I'm talking about the famed H. E. B. Grocery Co., originally established as the C. C. Butt Grocery Store in 1905 by Florence Thornton Butt in a small shop on the ground floor of her Victorian Era home in Kerrville, Texas. The company was named after her husband Charles C. Butt (but we can tell who was the boss there).

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/H-E-B

https://www.expressnews.com/150years/economy-business/article/H-E-B-started-in-small-Kerrville-store-110-years-6119800.php

Mr. and Mrs. Butt (undated picture)


Ms. Florence Thornton Butt


Ms. Butt behind the counter of her home shop


The original HEB. The C.C. Butt Grocery Store occupied just 750 square feet at the time,
sold bulk food on credit and also made deliveries.







Upon returning from WWI, Florence's youngest son, Howard E. Butt (after whom the supermarket chain was christened) took over the business, expanding it to other locations in Texas.

Mr. Howard E. Butt


Mr. H. E. Butt behind the wheel of  an HEB grocery delivery vehicle


The company's CEO today since 1971 is Charles Clarence Butt, the grandson of Ms. Florence Butt. HEB Grocery grew to be one the largest supermarket chains in America, and HEB ranked No. 15 on Forbes' 2014 list of "America's Largest Private Companies, with 86 000 employees, and an annual revenue over $20 billion (yes, billion with a "b"). Which by some form of dark magic has managed to confine itself within borders of the State of Texas, and a few scant shops scattered throughout North Mexico, in direct opposition to most supermarket chains which try to expand outwardly.

Art Deco HEB at Nogalitos St. in San Antonio, Texas, 1945


HEB in Hancock Center, Austin, Texas, 2010

« Last Edit: February 14, 2018, 10:59:41 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #1274 on: February 15, 2018, 12:07:58 am »

I prefer the first one made of wood.
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