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Author Topic: Dapper ancestor  (Read 21645 times)
Mercury Wells
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I insiste that you do call me WELLS. :)


« Reply #75 on: September 05, 2013, 06:18:21 am »

I wonder if anyone can date the first picture by the car?  


Miss Ktara...as far as I can tell, the car (a Ford?) is from the mid 20's (let's say 1924-27) maybe someone with photographic knowledge can enhance the Registration (unless the photo is a "Repoduction from a later time")
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Oh...my old war wound? I got that at The Battle of Dorking. Very nasty affair that was, I can tell you.

The Ministry of Tea respectfully advises you to drink one cup of tea day...for that +5 Moral Fibre stat.
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #76 on: September 05, 2013, 07:42:10 am »

I already posted some 1880s-90s and 1930s photos from my French side starting with my great-grand parents, but my Italian side and Basque side did not really have any good photos until the families became well to do in the 1920s and 30s.  A true rags to riches story spanning a single generation, my Great grand father Carlos Bazan was one of several brothers to first attend engineering college and actually make it to the top engineering position in the country: presidential appointee, head of the Federal Public Works Department in Mexico (sort of saying "Civil Engineer-General" instead of "Surgeon General" although we have no such federal civil engineering department or position in the United States).

The photos are looking a lot more "Latin" and with good reason.  His family were descendants of a bonafide noble - yet run down ancient Basque family (Bazan - Grand Marquisade of Santa Cruz, Circa 1120 prior to the formation of Spain) that had become mostly farmers in Northern Mexico by the turn of the century.  My Great Grandfather Carlos Bazan married the daughter, Elva Nora Barocio of an Italian-Mexican family, immigrants in the very late 1800's from Northern Italy (Baroccio --> Barocio). The eldest son of Carlos and Elva, Carlos Hugo is my grandfather and he is the one who raised me when my parents defaulted on their obligation nearly 45 years ago.



Many of the people in these photos are unidentified.  I just wrote the names of the people I could recognise offhand, but all of the names are actually very well documented if I can reach the right sources (the Barocio family made the news in Mexico ~30 years ago by having a 3000 family member reunion in Mexico City).

See that young chap, left between 1st and 2nd rows with round glasses and flat cap?  That is my grandfather.  Who does he remind you of, I wonder?


Some of the photographs are fantastic and I have many more.



My gradfather's younger sister (grand-aunt?) Elva Nora (still alive) as a small child


My grand-aunt Elva Nora much older as a young lady, presumably with her friends at the college of architecture in Mexico City (center of photo wearing a dark coloured jersey)







(Right click to zoom on photos)
This imposing gentleman is my Great grandfather Carlos Bazan-Cañamar (b. 1891 the second name in hyphenated Spanish surnames on the maternal side is not used in the English convention), the best engineer to walk the wild undeveloped lands of Mexico in the 1920s.  Built roads and bridges across the country and would often tow his son (below) to supervise projects on the field.



...And this one below is "Carlos Sr.'s eldest son,  my grandfather Carlos H. Bazan-Barocio in photo progression from child to adult.  Also became a civil engineer.  Odd characteristic of the Bazan family.  They are born with very light brown or blond hair and it gradually darkens to dark brown by adolescence.

He is the one who raised me, and who was born in 1922 and still with us at age 91.  Being the last child he raised and the one he spent most time with, I reserve the right to love him, respect him, brag about him and make fun of him  Grin



Now this is most interesting.  I know my great-grandfather (top picture) had several brothers and they took turns to go study in college abroad as they all needed to work on the farm.  The brothers would basically help the one who was studying, while the rest worked back in the farm.  Now I understand one of the brothers went to a military academy.  I had heard that it was in Paris, but I'm not sure.  I just stumbled on this photo of someone contemporary to Don Carlos (Sr.), and he is wearing a Pickelhaube helmet!!  Macht Admiral Wilhelm stolz!



I need to confirm this, but if true this could be Guillermo Bazan-Cañamar(?)

EDIT: I just found out that the Pickehaube may be associated with the Mexican Army parade dress uniform,  So it may still be the same person who went to the academy in Paris, so he may have followed a military career afterwards.


« Last Edit: September 06, 2013, 08:06:19 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged

J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #77 on: September 06, 2013, 07:59:50 am »

Ha!  I'm chuffed silly!  For those architects and architecture buffs in the forum, especially those who know something about early 20th. C American architecture:

Guess what I found?  Just a few posts above I showed my grand-aunt Elva Nora Bazan-Barocio, my grand-father's sister and the one I wrote about who became an architect?  Well I have a picture of her as a young woman, probably still as a student or recent graduate, next to none other than architect Frank Lloyd Wright  (Picture at bottom right -right click on your browser and click "View Image" so you may zoom into the picture).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Lloyd_Wright

Frank Lloyd Wright is the old man wearing the hat and my grand aunt, Elva Nora is right next to him with the big grin on her face (left).  I don't know where these photos were taken, though. The others look like a group of Mexican college students paying a visit to the old master.  But it must be prior to 1959 when Lloyd Wright passed away.

« Last Edit: September 06, 2013, 09:36:57 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Camellia Wingnut
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Take my camel, dear. . . .


« Reply #78 on: September 12, 2013, 05:04:30 am »

Goodness, Admiral, what a glamorous ancestress!
As a World History lecturer (you would never have guessed?) I used to ask students to find out about their great-grandparents, linking them to the past. Since we were in Hawaii, there were stories from everywhere! One person was descended from headhunters (really!). Another was part Tahitian, part Turkish. One was constantly reminded of the fact that sailors pass through Honolulu.
We have one of the most Steampunk of ancestors, described on his marriage certificate as a "boiler-maker's riveter." Probably not dapper, but disheveled.
Who else has steam in their veins?
C.W.
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Take my camel, dear, said my aunt Camellia, climbing down from that animal on her return from high mass. The camel, a white Arabian Dhalur (single hump) from the famous herd of the Ruola tribe, had been a parting present, its saddle-bags stuffed with low-carat [sic] gold and flashy orient gems, from a rich desert tycoon. . . .
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #79 on: September 12, 2013, 08:02:29 am »

Goodness, Admiral, what a glamorous ancestress!
As a World History lecturer (you would never have guessed?) I used to ask students to find out about their great-grandparents, linking them to the past. Since we were in Hawaii, there were stories from everywhere! One person was descended from headhunters (really!). Another was part Tahitian, part Turkish. One was constantly reminded of the fact that sailors pass through Honolulu.
We have one of the most Steampunk of ancestors, described on his marriage certificate as a "boiler-maker's riveter." Probably not dapper, but disheveled.
Who else has steam in their veins?
C.W.

Thank you Ms. Wingnut.  She is still alive in San Diego, albeit very sick with a red-blood cell deficiency. Her brother, my grandfather is also alive in a nursing home close to me in Austin, he can no longer walk, but still is of sound mind.

I do not have many possessions in the world now, but I do have a rather interesting family background and a treasure trove of photos and movies to back it up, with the photos dating back to the early 1890's and the movies in 8mm and super 8mm format from the 1930's until the 1980's.  I may try to upload a family movie to you Tube or perhaps host a standard format movie in my website (might be safer) if I can figure out how.

At least I can I can dream of happier times
« Last Edit: September 12, 2013, 08:06:46 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Camellia Wingnut
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Take my camel, dear. . . .


« Reply #80 on: September 13, 2013, 12:15:23 am »

My Dear Admiral,
Dreaming of happier times probably fortifies the immune system. If I were you, I would pursue your Basque connection. The most mysterious ethnic group on the planet, and very special.
I do not, of course, refer to the Basque bodice (or indeed to any undergarment).
However, Wikipedia states that the garment was meant to resemble Basque national dress. How intriguing!
Toodle-Oo,
C.W.
« Last Edit: September 13, 2013, 12:17:40 am by Camellia Wingnut » Logged
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #81 on: September 13, 2013, 02:26:39 am »

Dear Aunt Camillia:

It is precisely my grand-aunt Elva (the one in the picture above) who has the most accurate records on the Basque side.  Unfortunately the Basque family became poor in the 19th.C and they proliferated in the Northern part of Mexico mixing in with the locals.  So the records are more complete on the Italian side (Barocio), and the bulk of my data is the film and photographs from the 1920s (marriage between the Italian and Basque sides), and some letters from the late 1800's.  Making the connection from the 20th C to the 18th. C when the lineage could be traced clearly across the pond is difficult.

We know that the Bazans came in three waves as early as the Conquest period, and as late as the 18th. C.  with each wave it seems the lineage had gone down in social standing.  The title of Grand Marquis was last held by a colonist in the New Spain in the 1700's.  Beyond that the title in that family only continued in Europe, gradually vanishing away.  Because of the Holy Roman Empire under Charles V, there is a Bazan connection in Austria and there are a few people with that name, with the original Basque region being rather devoid of the name today, save a valley that carries the original name of the family (point of origin) upon which you have a municipality and rest some mediaeval ruins.  That region used to be the Kingdom of Navarre at the time (11-1200s).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baztan_%28municipality%29
http://tripnavarra.com/portfolio/tour-baztan-valley-and-zugarramundi/

« Last Edit: September 13, 2013, 02:39:41 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Camellia Wingnut
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Take my camel, dear. . . .


« Reply #82 on: September 13, 2013, 09:50:39 am »

My Dear Admiral,
It appears that the Basque region you describe is notorious for witches - or should I say, for the witch-hunting that gripped Europe in the 16th century, which found victims there. Do you ever feel as if you are a warlock? It would be strange for you to go to that cave when people gather with torches; atavistic memory might return.
In my distant youth (not quite as distant as the 16th century) our village in Dorset had a torchlight procession for some reason, after dark. It was a nightmare, exceptionally frightening, as it should be, since mobs are a perennial evil.
If only we could copy our DNA on a flash drive and watch our ancestors' lives as a drama!
C.W.
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gigiberts
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« Reply #83 on: September 21, 2014, 07:34:52 pm »

Hi, My name is Gabriela Carroll. I saw the photos you posted and i recognized my great grandfather Gustavo Bazan Canamar. I would love to get in touch and exchange information and photos if possible. My email: gabbys_99@yahoo.com
thanks
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J. Wilhelm
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Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


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« Reply #84 on: September 22, 2014, 12:20:18 am »

Hi, My name is Gabriela Carroll. I saw the photos you posted and i recognized my great grandfather Gustavo Bazan Canamar. I would love to get in touch and exchange information and photos if possible. My email: gabbys_99@yahoo.com
thanks

In what part of the world are you?  I'll reply by Email as well.  I'm sad to say that his nephew Carlos Bazan (Jr) passed away this May.  I have lots of original photos and home film (8mm) dating back to the 1930's on the Bazan side in Mexico City, but the next of kin to be an expert in identifying the names is his sister, Elva Nora in California who is still alive.
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