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Author Topic: Are you sewing anything right now? Mk II  (Read 67791 times)
greensteam
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Steamed up from birth


« Reply #600 on: April 28, 2013, 11:27:27 am »

I agree with all the people saying go with and older machine.  My primary machine is a singer that was my mothers from the 60s.  It is a heavy chunk of avocado coloured metal but it will stitch whatever I tell it to and not fuss about it.  My second machine is an industrial model from the 80s and it has all the stitches I will ever need and is quite good at freehand embroidery.

Unfortunately all the good old sewing machines are being kept by their owners.

I think a much worse problem is that the AllSaints clothing chain has bought up some 10,000 old sewing machines to decorate their storefronts. Their big shop in Glasgow has over 400 in the windows alone and more inside the shop. The tragedy is that these machines will be no use if ever Allsaints decide to get rid of them as all the mechanisms are gone.
What an unbelievable waste of such useful machines.
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frances
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« Reply #601 on: April 28, 2013, 03:10:51 pm »

Oh I saw a shop in brighton, on the south coast, that had shelves of old machines in their window.  Do they really take out the mechanisms?
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greensteam
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« Reply #602 on: April 28, 2013, 06:12:24 pm »

Oh I saw a shop in brighton, on the south coast, that had shelves of old machines in their window.  Do they really take out the mechanisms?

well, they have done in the Glasgow shop, which I include in my "30-minute Geek Walk" tour of central Glasgow.
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Miss Groves
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« Reply #603 on: April 29, 2013, 06:54:10 pm »

just spent a week staying with a friend to help her out in making a cassock.
I started out with a commercial pattern but we found it wasn't right for her needs so i drafted a pattern from one of my old victorian resources and made this:




pics were taken before i took in the side seam to make it very slim fitting
« Last Edit: May 01, 2013, 10:30:11 pm by Miss Groves » Logged

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Corroded Alloy
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JacobTheunissen
« Reply #604 on: April 29, 2013, 11:51:56 pm »

Quote
I remember seeing that coat when you first posted it. Very nice indeed.

The answer to your first question is: don't use fusible interfacing. It's certainly more work, but if you use hair canvas and pad stitching not only will they not flop around, but they'll fold back on the lapel line perfectly and without ironing to begin with. J.E. Liberty's Practical Tailoring is a free book that gives some description of this and other tailoring techniques.

As for hem creases, I can see how corduroy might be difficult to press permanently. You might have to try prick stitching along the hem edge to hold it firmly in place. Again, not fast but permanent.

Thanks. Thank you for the advice. So I won’t be using fusible interfacing. I’m perusing J.E. Liberty's Practical Tailoring. I love these old books.
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frances
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« Reply #605 on: April 30, 2013, 04:54:18 pm »

I have now had a row with the shop where I bought the Brother embroidery machine.  Does anyone else have a brother?  When I first got it I took it back within a few weeks because it was shredding the threads.  The man in the shop said it was because I was not using the correct threads.  I took the machine back yesterday because I was using the correct threads and it was still shredding them and also the automatic threader had broken, again.  This is about the 5th time I have taken it back to the shop. 

This time he tried to tell me I had used the machine too much - I have had it for 18 months and have not used it for the past 6 months or so anyway. It was knotting up underneath, the bobbin thread was breaking and the machine did not tell me, threads were shedding sometimes quickly sometimes after a few minutes, sometimes the threads went through OK and sometimes they did not - all very unreliable and precarious.  He has kept the machine and said he could not get to look at it for at least a week.

So the hat will not get much done, which is a shame as I was enjoying doing the design.

I have now started to look for another make of machine that might be more reliable.  Does anyone have a favourite?
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Stella Gaslight
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« Reply #606 on: April 30, 2013, 06:32:46 pm »

I had a brother all plastic machine for a year and is wasn't bad starting up but it couldn't hold up over time to the amount of work I wanted it to do so I passed it along to someone who only uses it now and then.  I have heard good things about whites and jacomes but I would suggest if you know any local quilters asking them too because they tend to do a lot of sewing.
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Lady Toadflinger
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« Reply #607 on: May 07, 2013, 03:14:25 pm »

I had to laugh at myself yesterday. I have had my sewing machine for almost 40 years now, and I finally got the nerve to try the twin sewing needle that has been lying in my sewing box for YEARS. Hahahaha! That was fun! I can't believe that I missed out on using it for all sorts of applications all these years... The manual didn't cover its use, so I never thought to try it. Yesterday I looked it up online, and...Presto!
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Ms. Avalon
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« Reply #608 on: May 16, 2013, 04:20:32 pm »

At this moment I am focusing on sewing my first vest, it shall be underbust. I just finished my mockup and I'm hopeful that it shall turn out nice. I'm also sewing a skirt, but all I must do to finish it is arm it and add buttons. After this I will start sewing an over skirt.
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The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results. - Rita Mae Brown
frances
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« Reply #609 on: May 16, 2013, 08:39:41 pm »

My embroidery machine has gone back to the manufacturers.  It turns out that the dealer who has taken it back for repair at least 5 times is not registered to do warranty repairs.  He should not have touched the machine.

I have been working on modifying a jacket to go with the hat.  I am indulging myself with lots of frilly lace and pearls and hand embroidery, all of which I like sewing.  I much prefer hand sewing to using a machine.  I am half-way to putting in short oversleeves but at the moment cannot decide whether to make them into puffed sleeves or gather them up the middle in a 'v' shape.  Once I have done the jacket, (going to change the lapels and the collar), I plan to add some more lace to the frills at the base of the skirt.  I am using a photograph of around 1902 as inspiration for the skirt; i.e. it is ground-length and A-line shaped. 

Well, what other excuse can a lady of a certain age find to wear frilly, lacy clothes?
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Sulla
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« Reply #610 on: May 17, 2013, 02:23:23 pm »

I am re-purposing this surplus coat into a tailed waistcoat just for the fun of it.  I still need to clean up the edges (I plan on putting bias tape around the edges in an ode to military piping.)

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nellspaulding
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« Reply #611 on: May 24, 2013, 03:49:36 am »

I just finished modding my prom gown from 2001 (David's Bridal) into a serviceably steamy evening gown with the help of a lace overlay:

Before:


After:


Also, I just attended the Steampunk World's Fair, and I'm determined to do a lot more elaborate costume sewing this year! I've been sewing for about a year ago and slowly getting better at it, but pretty much everything I do is still an experiment at this point.
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MsKim
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« Reply #612 on: May 24, 2013, 08:25:48 pm »

Oh, that is a lovely improvement upon your old prom dress!!! Very well done indeed!
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frances
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« Reply #613 on: May 29, 2013, 07:13:14 pm »

Next time, how about adding an elaborate hat.  you can buy an old one and dress it up with loads of stuff as a contrast to your simple line dress and over-dress.  How about it?
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nellspaulding
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« Reply #614 on: May 30, 2013, 01:37:47 pm »

Oh, I have plenty of plans for hats. I have one dressed-up fedora and two straw hat to touring hat conversions in the works right now. I like fascinators for evening wear too - the one in the picture is my first attempt at making one, but I'm going to keep experimenting.
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lientie
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bethanlientie
« Reply #615 on: May 31, 2013, 10:55:29 pm »

I just finished modding my prom gown from 2001 (David's Bridal) into a serviceably steamy evening gown with the help of a lace overlay:

Before:


After:


Also, I just attended the Steampunk World's Fair, and I'm determined to do a lot more elaborate costume sewing this year! I've been sewing for about a year ago and slowly getting better at it, but pretty much everything I do is still an experiment at this point.


Love that, especially with the gloves Smiley

Current sewing project is having a go at a Lolita-steampunk sort of dress in dark brown and sap green. Made a dress a few weeks ago in the kind of shape I want and it worked out surprisingly well, very wearable, so now having a go at something more elaborate for the asylum.

I've made the top half but my machine had decided to stall trying to sew any fabric :/ I've changed the needle, tried different tensions, cleared out all the fluff from inside it, can't work it out.. pretty frustrating. I just want to get on with making it!
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frances
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« Reply #616 on: June 01, 2013, 05:21:50 pm »

My machines only gets a strop on when I have a tight deadline!!
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lientie
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bethanlientie
« Reply #617 on: June 02, 2013, 08:17:37 pm »

It's always just when they're really needed :p
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frances
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« Reply #618 on: June 02, 2013, 09:02:12 pm »

Personally I prefer hand sewing every time.  Then I have complete control over everything - the tension, the size of stitch, how much I pick up in my needle and so on.  The only thing that sometimes happens is that the needle bends - but I am well used to working with a bent needle if it is one I am comfortable using for that job. 

I have had to be very strict with myself as I always want to add surface decoration to everything I make.  If it is something for peasant or middle class status I do have to keep a tight control over myself else there would be pearls and jewels peppered all over the place!
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Sam Watson
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Steampunk Cowboy


« Reply #619 on: June 04, 2013, 07:06:50 pm »

I just finished making a pair of 1838 drawers:



All hand-sewn, in cotton twill.
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Samuel Xavier Watson
lientie
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bethanlientie
« Reply #620 on: June 04, 2013, 08:17:56 pm »

Personally I prefer hand sewing every time.  Then I have complete control over everything - the tension, the size of stitch, how much I pick up in my needle and so on.  The only thing that sometimes happens is that the needle bends - but I am well used to working with a bent needle if it is one I am comfortable using for that job. 

I have had to be very strict with myself as I always want to add surface decoration to everything I make.  If it is something for peasant or middle class status I do have to keep a tight control over myself else there would be pearls and jewels peppered all over the place!

I just don't have the patience for hand sewing, used to do it for everything but since having sewing machines, i couldn't go back to doing just that..but I really admire people who can!
Found this absolutely beautiful coat online recently, long kind of military looking felt one for ladies, quite elaborate..I can't share photos on my tablet but I'll post it here soon, would love to make a version of it as my next project.
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Unsubtle Pete
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« Reply #621 on: June 04, 2013, 11:37:22 pm »

I just finished making a pair of 1838 drawers:



All hand-sewn, in cotton twill.


They look wonderfully comfortable  Smiley
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Lachlan_MacAuslander
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« Reply #622 on: June 10, 2013, 10:40:05 pm »

Sorry to hear of your travails with the Brother embroidery machine, Lady Frances. My spouse and I finally had a chance to test ours this weekend, and it seemed to work quite nicely (although I suspect the thread tension need a little tweaking). We also made the happy discovery that our model will accept the next larger sized embroidery hoop, so our options just expanded - literally...

Now we just need to acquire more colors of embroidery thread and  a crapton of bobbins...
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frances
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« Reply #623 on: June 11, 2013, 11:36:38 pm »

Hi Lachlan, what model do you have?  I'm dying to know what you plan to embroider with yours.  Will I know who you are without being introduced due to all the lovely embroidery on your outfits?

I think that I have got over the phase when I need to keep looking at patterns.  I am very selective on what I download too.  I'm amazed at what you can get for free online.  I've also been very touched by how nice people are when a problem develops - well everyone except the dealer who sold me the machine in the first place.

My machine has now arrived back from the main place in Manchester but I have to get down to playing with it again.  They told me to phone them up and they will give me tips on how to prevent the problems I have been having.  However I have got side-tracked into making and hand embroidering the rest of the outfit.  I am going to feel very steamy when all the bits are put together.  OOooo!
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Lachlan_MacAuslander
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« Reply #624 on: June 25, 2013, 10:24:47 pm »

Can't recall the model number off the top of my head, but it appears to be comparable to the Innov-is 950D - we bought a used one from a local shop. We've been shopping for patterns at Urban Threads.

As for what we're putting the embroidery on, that's the next step - we're still working on the Turkish-inspired outfits (along with a backstory about a temporal circuit malfunction over the Black Sea...) now that I've got the sleeve seam disentangled from the side seam... Angry

First project will likely be the Tarboosh/Smoking Hat, followed by a waistcoat (Simplicity Learn-to-Sew patterns FTW!). I've got the Tarboosh pattern cut out and sized for my noggin, so now I need to get my fabric stash back out of storage.
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