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Author Topic: Are you sewing anything right now? Mk II  (Read 50421 times)
Unsubtle Pete
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Discerning Scoundrel.


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« Reply #575 on: March 17, 2013, 12:27:04 pm »

Looks pretty good, I've honestly seen worse for sale but if you do want to improve it for next time.

Thanks, and thanks for the advice. The vast majority of the problems with it were due to the pace of work - I had a nice schedule for work prior to the steampunk market to get everything done in good time, but then ended up in hospital and was unable to get any sewing done for a couple of weeks while convalescing. I've uploaded it aware that is isn't my absolute best, but it is actually quite reassuring to see your critisicism - I always worry people are just trying to be polite and ignore flaws, and that isn't helpful at all. As it is, I agree with the vast majority of what you said, a lot of it being stuff I've already identified  Wink.

The fit over the hips also isn't quite perfect, but honestly, I'd rather make a new bodice than do the work required to fix that.

Quote
1) Bone  centre front and front bust lines quick sketch in punctuation,  )|(   boning follows the seam as on the back.

It would definitely have benefited from centre front boning, however between making this and finishing stock, I simply ran out of time.

Quote
2) The front upper skirt section is hanging a little flat sew in a little to create a horizontal curve fold.  
    There are several people on this thread who sew better than I do and can explain the tecnique properly.

It is meant to hang relatively flat, so as to contrast with more dramatic back drapery.

Quote
3) For the sleeves, you may want to include an underarm gusset for ease of movement
    It's amazing how many dress patterns assume the wearer never raises her arms.

The current problem with the sleeves is that the forward sleeve seam is too low. Wearer did not have any problems with movement, possibly due to fairly extensive gathers on the top of the shoulder. These also need neatening up as the sleeves were set entirely by machine - again due to lack of time. I'll likely be resetting these sleeves anyway.

Quote

4) If you have any of the blue fabric left over you may want to make cockades,flowers or rosettes.
    These can be placed on the velvet bodice and/or the hat to tie the outfit together.
    Black velvet ribbon used as edging and/or decoration on the dress would also work to do this.

That's the plan. Again, ran out of time. Hard to tell from the picture, but the plume of the hat is bound with the purple satin.

Quote
5) Optional accessories
    Black lace fingerless mitts, there are some pretty crocheted versions about.
    Jewellery, cameo broach or perhaps jet beads.
    If the out fit does not have pockets a large black handbag with a long strap to put over the shoulder at need.

Crocheted lace gloves would certainly work. It actually has openings for pockets (one each side, in the seams between the centre front and the side gores, under the apron drape). Again, ran out of time here, as they are currently just openings without pocket bags.
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Sam Watson
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United States United States


Steampunk Cowboy


« Reply #576 on: March 25, 2013, 01:51:48 pm »

Here are some pictures of my finished frock coat. I also made everything else I'm wearing except for the cheap costume cravat. Smiley



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Samuel Xavier Watson
walking stick
Zeppelin Admiral
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England England


« Reply #577 on: March 25, 2013, 03:14:53 pm »

Good outfit, looks like your natural wardrobe.
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Lady Toadflinger
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United States United States



« Reply #578 on: March 25, 2013, 04:18:12 pm »

That is really a stunning outfit! Good job!
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Banfili
Zeppelin Captain
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Australia Australia



« Reply #579 on: March 25, 2013, 11:09:59 pm »

Very spiffy, Sam!
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Dr Anima T.M. Bibbye
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« Reply #580 on: March 26, 2013, 02:42:25 pm »

I'm somewhat new to machine sewing (and awful and impatient with hand sewing)
But I successfully made a bustier style top from a cheap pattern.  This first one i've done with a rockabilly style skull fabric but i'm thinking of doing a more steampunky one.
Next pattern i'm waiting for is a simplicity steampunk costume which i'm going to make more individual.
http://www.simplicitynewlook.com/2207/#.UVGlVRws5_A
I'm planning on making the jacket in a 'suit' style fabric....will see how complicated it is when it arrives  Wink
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Explorer of ancient civilisations, student of ancient pathogens, doodler, seamstress, devourer of fiction.
frances
Zeppelin Captain
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United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #581 on: March 26, 2013, 07:00:11 pm »

I'm still working on my newest hat.  I've been doing a bit every day for the past few weeks.  It would have taken less time, but I had to change the design of the sub-structure in the middle and that caused complications on various of the other parts.

It is a solid hat, based upon a top hat style, made of pelmet buckram and wire.  Because one of the components is relatively heavy all the other parts have to be substantial to hold that part up.  So there are 4 wire coat hangers which have had to be bent to shape and cut; these are much more solid than ordinary millinery wire or the plastic magic wire and so much more difficult to work.  I am sewing wire down using a leather glove or pliers to push and pull the needle through the buckram.

Then today I used some spray glue to stick two parts of the brim together and the glue came out in a jet instead of a spray.  It soaked through the shot silk fabric that is covering the underside of the brim and marked it.  So now another stage has been added; I will have to put some lace over the silk to hide the marks.

Looks like the first time it gets an outing will be to show it as a WIP, rather than resting on my head.
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D.Oakes
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United States United States



« Reply #582 on: March 28, 2013, 12:34:06 pm »

Working on a Richmond Depot II Shell Jacket for a friend.  Nearly done with the exterior. 
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Rockula
Board Moderator
Rogue Ætherlord
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Nothing beats a good hat.


« Reply #583 on: April 02, 2013, 12:32:20 pm »

For those of you who sew and have access to British TV.
The BBC have a new programme (starting tonight) on BBC2 at 8pm.
It aims to do for sewing what 'The Great British Bake-Off' did for cakes. Smiley

''The Great British Sewing Bee''

One of the contestants is apparently a Steampunk.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/tvandradio/9954479/Stitching-together-The-Great-British-Sewing-Bee.html
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mephit
Zeppelin Captain
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United States United States



« Reply #584 on: April 04, 2013, 06:52:15 am »

Here are some pictures of my finished frock coat. I also made everything else I'm wearing except for the cheap costume cravat. Smiley





That's quite nice! The linen shell worked out well. I'm trying to convince myself to get off my duff and pattern out the officer's dress uniform I have floating about in my head.
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yereverluvinunclebert
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United Kingdom United Kingdom



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« Reply #585 on: April 13, 2013, 02:14:56 am »

I am currently stitching (does that count?) an old WWI British army leather jerkin. The seams need some tender care and attention, some Neats foot oil and some lanolin. With a thick belt around the waist, a tin helmet - it will start to look the part.
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Kryss LaBryn
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Canada Canada


aka Lady Amelia Cottington


« Reply #586 on: April 22, 2013, 02:26:53 pm »

I have been thinking of doing a new SP skirt, something full-length and a bit more formal than my first one, which was firmly designed to be appropriate for scrambling over fossil beds. Now I want something more appropriate for tea.

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Huh. Guess what I'm trying to describe is something like this skirt, more or less. I'd have the ruffle almost right to the floor and wouldn't have the train in the back, but yeah, I guess that's basically it. *Grin* Only with more colours and patterns.
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frances
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #587 on: April 25, 2013, 09:53:20 pm »

I'm still working on my newest hat.  I am enjoying making it and I am enjoying what it looks like up to now. 

Last Christmas I bought myself an embroidery machine.  With a lot of cussing I have taught myself to use it.  The time and effort spent on it is now paying dividends as I have decided to redesign the crown top and to add a machine embroidered scene. 

I have trialed the design, well half of the design to see how it works, and today went out and purchased a few new reels of machine embroidery thread.  I have discovered that it is not easy to use ordinary sewing cotton on the machine.  What happens is that the fluff comes off as it goes through the needle and associated parts and this fluff gums up the works.  Then all sorts of weird things start to happen with no obvious explanation.  I Have Learned My Lesson.
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LadyAsprin
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« Reply #588 on: April 25, 2013, 10:30:48 pm »

I am planning on actually learning to sew myself - instead of getting Mum to do the sewing. 

I have been looking at sewing machines and was wondering if anybody had any tips or features to look out for/avoid?

I have been to two shops locally and they have both given recommendations - here are two of them

http://www.johnlewis.com/janome-7025-sewing-machine/p231340608
+
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Brother-Innov-10A-Anniversary-Machine/dp/B003TJYMT4

Any opinions on these?

I don't want to spend too much but I do want to be able to sew denim weight fabric and these two are in the same price bracket.
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Banfili
Zeppelin Captain
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Australia Australia



« Reply #589 on: April 25, 2013, 11:53:14 pm »

I bought myself the Singer 160th Anniversary Edition sewing machine for my birthday. It has been made in the traditional black and gold, with  a retro look - looks very steampunk. I might even get it out of the box & play with it this year!
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mephit
Zeppelin Captain
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United States United States



« Reply #590 on: April 26, 2013, 12:29:55 am »

I have been looking at sewing machines and was wondering if anybody had any tips or features to look out for/avoid?

Personally, I prefer old machines to new. Here in the States, at least, they can often be found for about the same price as new machines, but are usually much better built. Until the '70s, basically all machines were built with steel gearing. Now, it's all nylon. There's nothing wrong with that per se, but they can't take nearly the strain older machines can. My primary is a 1950s Pfaff 130 I bought about 10 years ago for 225 USD on eBay. Weighs about 70 Lbs and will sew anything from the finest handkerchief silk to garment-weight leather. I know. I've sewn both with it. It will even do machine embroidery, though its manually controlled, of course. Look around in jumble shops, yard sales and swap meets. You never know when someone is going to decide to get rid of Granny's old lump that nobody uses anymore.
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Lady Toadflinger
Snr. Officer
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United States United States



« Reply #591 on: April 26, 2013, 03:12:48 pm »

I like the older machines, too. My favorite is my 35 year old Kenmore, which is actually made out of METAL! Wink I see the older machines in the thrift stores all the time, and they cost from $15 to  $30. If someone local can connect you with a good repairman, you can get a good machine for a fraction of the cost of the new machines. Old Viking sewing machines are great, and are often available on the internet, but at a steep price. Mine from the 80's was $400, but it is worth every penny!
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Corroded Alloy
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JacobTheunissen
« Reply #592 on: April 26, 2013, 07:23:47 pm »

Mr. Watson what a lovely ensemble.

Two years ago, with support and advice from the lovely people on this forum, I made a frock coat.
This was my first foray into garment making and I was very pleased with the results. I wear my frock coat everyday – wind, rain, sun and snow. Making it was a huge learning curve and only after making the coat and subsequently wearing it was I able to analyse the things that I would do differently next time.
The other week as I was coming out of my public library I heard a woman’s voice say “that’s a cool coat.”  I turned to see who was admiring my coat and got chatting with a very nice lady, she really likes my coat.  She asked me if I would make her a coat like mine. I agreed and said I’d love to. This is now my new project and I am gathering everything together and getting organised.
For my coat I drew my own pattern and I’m sure I can adapt this to fit someone else.
Advice on the following would be very much appreciated. Like my original frock coat, this one will be made of chunky corduroy. With mine I used fusible interfacing but the lapels, which I purposely made rather large, are quite floppy and I need to press them frequently otherwise they curl. I wondered if a stiffer interfacing would be the answer?
Also how do I make the hem creases more permanent? Simply pressing them with an iron didn’t really make them stay put.

Link to original coat here.
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Sam Watson
Snr. Officer
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United States United States


Steampunk Cowboy


« Reply #593 on: April 26, 2013, 08:29:36 pm »

Advice on the following would be very much appreciated. Like my original frock coat, this one will be made of chunky corduroy. With mine I used fusible interfacing but the lapels, which I purposely made rather large, are quite floppy and I need to press them frequently otherwise they curl. I wondered if a stiffer interfacing would be the answer?
Also how do I make the hem creases more permanent? Simply pressing them with an iron didn’t really make them stay put.


I remember seeing that coat when you first posted it. Very nice indeed.

The answer to your first question is: don't use fusible interfacing. It's certainly more work, but if you use hair canvas and pad stitching not only will they not flop around, but they'll fold back on the lapel line perfectly and without ironing to begin with. J.E. Liberty's Practical Tailoring is a free book that gives some description of this and other tailoring techniques.

As for hem creases, I can see how corduroy might be difficult to press permanently. You might have to try prick stitching along the hem edge to hold it firmly in place. Again, not fast but permanent.
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Stella Gaslight
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« Reply #594 on: April 26, 2013, 10:08:33 pm »

I agree with all the people saying go with and older machine.  My primary machine is a singer that was my mothers from the 60s.  It is a heavy chunk of avocado coloured metal but it will stitch whatever I tell it to and not fuss about it.  My second machine is an industrial model from the 80s and it has all the stitches I will ever need and is quite good at freehand embroidery.
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greensteam
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United Kingdom United Kingdom


Steamed up from birth


« Reply #595 on: April 27, 2013, 09:51:21 pm »

I have cut the pieces to make hubby a smoking cap, not for actual smoking of course, but that style of pill box shaped hat for wearing indoors, as his chemo has done the usual thing of making hair disappear.

It is going to be black velvet around the side, overlaid with appliqued glittery silky sari stuff and the top will be green and purple velvet with yellow embroidery. All from the scrap bag.
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LadyAsprin
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Scotland Scotland


Sabreuse.


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« Reply #596 on: April 27, 2013, 10:45:30 pm »

I agree with all the people saying go with and older machine.  My primary machine is a singer that was my mothers from the 60s.  It is a heavy chunk of avocado coloured metal but it will stitch whatever I tell it to and not fuss about it.  My second machine is an industrial model from the 80s and it has all the stitches I will ever need and is quite good at freehand embroidery.

Unfortunately all the good old sewing machines are being kept by their owners.
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Stella Gaslight
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« Reply #597 on: April 27, 2013, 11:33:55 pm »

What you need you find is a thrift store or some place that people will take things the don't want.  Locally to me sewing machines pop up in flea markets too when people want to clear out some of their older relatives things.  And a lot of time if they don't sew perfect people just trash them.  My mom gave me hers because she couldn't get it to work right. All it needed was a metal bobbin and a good cleaning and lubeing and it worked like a dream.
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LadyAsprin
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« Reply #598 on: April 27, 2013, 11:35:42 pm »

What you need you find is a thrift store or some place that people will take things the don't want.  Locally to me sewing machines pop up in flea markets too when people want to clear out some of their older relatives things.  And a lot of time if they don't sew perfect people just trash them.  My mom gave me hers because she couldn't get it to work right. All it needed was a metal bobbin and a good cleaning and lubeing and it worked like a dream.

A lot of UK charity shops don't take electricals due to PAT testing (electrical safety) - or at least they didn't.
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Kryss LaBryn
Snr. Officer
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Canada Canada


aka Lady Amelia Cottington


« Reply #599 on: April 28, 2013, 01:15:24 am »

One might try a want ad in the area newspapers, etc. Usually (in Canada, at least) want ads are free. Just say you're looking for a cheap, basic, sturdy machine. Perhaps one will turn up! Won't hurt to ask, anyways, especially if the ad is free.

I have a ridiculous collection of sewing machines, myself, albeit unintentionally; I started with my Mum's old one when she upgraded, then got one of my best machines, a solid metal beastie from the Thirties that had been a friend's grandmothers; she tasked him with getting rid of it and I got a thing that only does straight stitches in forward and reverse, but which goes like stink and can sew through anything. I mostly use it for tents.

I got another, newer, "nicer" (albeit all plastic) one when another friend who worked at a pawn shop had one come in; he called me and I got one like new that does several stitches for an excellent price; and my main one that I use the most these days is another solid metal thingie (but that allegedly does 20+ fancy stitches if I can ever figure it out) that I got for $20 at a second-hand store, in a cabinet!! just lucked out and happened to be in there at the right time. Also, it being ancient and the cabinet butt-ugly, people probably weren't all that interested in it. But it sews great!  Cheesy

Looking at how I ended up with most of mine, I'd suggest leaving your name and number with people in thrift stores, second-hand shops, and pawn shops, and just let them know what you're looking for (older, preferably metal sewing machine, in decent condition but doesn't need to look pretty), and try and pop in once or twice a month and see if anything's surfaced yet. Got my silver tea pot from a second-hand store doing that. They, in turn, will probably be pretty happy to have someone they can foist an uglier machine off on who won't care if it's not shiny and/or new.



I went and picked up some lovely drapery material for a new Steampunk skirt yesterday, and stumbled across this lovely fabric from Benartex, called "Majestic Paisley Willow":

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

I'm going to make my little girl a new Victorian dress. I've got some lovely cream lace that looks (but probably isn't) hand-crocheted. Got it all washed and ironed today; tomorrow I'll start in on it. I'm probably a bit over-ambitious in my intent to finish the whole thing off tomorrow, but I ought to be able to get it cut out and largely pieced together, though! I'll share pics when it's done, of course.

She's got such lovely moss-green eyes, and really flaxen hair, that the material will look absolutely gorgeous on her, I think!!
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