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Author Topic: Are you sewing anything right now? Mk II  (Read 68367 times)
Sam Watson
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Steampunk Cowboy


« Reply #500 on: November 20, 2012, 05:32:18 pm »

I finished my waistcoat:


and have begun work on a smoking cap. The cap's being made of an olive wool melton, interlined with linen. I'm embroidering it as well, which is taking a long time since I decided to pad satin stitch everything. Ah well, it'll be nice and warm when it's finished. Pictures coming when I get them off my phone.
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Samuel Xavier Watson
D.Oakes
Zeppelin Admiral
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United States United States



« Reply #501 on: November 21, 2012, 06:30:57 pm »

Great work! 

Here is my tactical waistcoat so far:


Wool twill, cotton twill, and canvas duck.  It will most likely have black cotton twill trim. 
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Sam Watson
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Steampunk Cowboy


« Reply #502 on: November 21, 2012, 08:08:23 pm »

Looking good so far, but why is it "tactical"? When I hear that I think either a lot of pockets (or other attachment points), or bulletproof. Ahah - it must be lined with Kevlar!
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D.Oakes
Zeppelin Admiral
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United States United States



« Reply #503 on: November 21, 2012, 11:31:25 pm »

Actually yes and yes!  It is an experiment as to the potential practical applications of steampunk.  I have a friend who does armed security work and many times he in situations where he needs to keep a low profile, but wants to be ready for anything.  The original concept came from all the crime that has been going on along my route to work at the museum I work at and I wanted something to protect myself, but was low profile. 

This was the original inspiration, straight from the museum's collection:
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Elycium
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United States United States


addicted to fancy clothes

Elycium
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« Reply #504 on: November 27, 2012, 03:27:29 am »

I finished my waistcoat:



I love the colour!


I've started sewing again. Currently working on a new bell skirt, though the lighting in my room doesn't do the colour of the fabric any justice.
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"Humans need fantasy to be human."  - Death from "The Hogfather"
ktara
Officer
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Canada Canada



« Reply #505 on: November 27, 2012, 05:24:06 am »

Very nice everyone Smiley  I'm trying to make a blouse, but my sewing machine needle keeps unthreading.   I think I need to play with the tension?
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Stella Gaslight
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« Reply #506 on: November 27, 2012, 07:08:47 am »

I would check the tension every time you try a different spool of thread.  I find older thread needs a lighter touch.  Also make sure your thread is feeding well,  If it gets stuck on something it will cause a whole lot of problems. 
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ktara
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« Reply #507 on: November 27, 2012, 12:11:49 pm »

Thanks Stella Smiley
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Kryss LaBryn
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aka Lady Amelia Cottington


« Reply #508 on: December 01, 2012, 01:01:15 am »

I am definitely getting into the final planning stages of this 1880-era summer tea gown I'm planning (the calico one; except I found a not-calico that I quite like, and for a decent price, today so I think I'm going with that since I can't find a decent calico around here), and I'm just planning the underpinnings while I try and figure out the yardage.

I've made a bustle cushion for another outfit but for this one I want an actual cage bustle, because first of all, I want the back to come out at closer to parallel to the floor, and I find that while the cushion bustles add fullness at the back, they sort of tend to sag, and I won't be having enough ruffles or what back there to make up the difference in height. And the second reason is that I want to be as cool as possible (I know I won't actually be "cool", not with a corset, the camisole, and the bodice on), so I want to keep things as light and airy as possible. It ought to be better than my wool skirt, at least!

My problem, though, is that while I have sort of made two matching cage bustles for an 18th century Robe a l'Anglaise back when, I've never made one that I would end up sitting on, so I'm inexperienced there.

For my cage panniers I just used packing strapping (the metal kind--makes wonderful corset boning, by the way, so long as you're only bending in the one direction; if the bone needs to go side to side as well you need the coiled steel boning but otherwise this stuff is a fantastic--and free--substitute)--I won't go into detail but it ended up with something that went straight out instead of out at a downward angle, and I'd like to reproduce the effect to have that proper "centaur" look, buuuuut the only way I know of doing it is with metal hoops, and the boned bustles I'm seeing online have stiff hoops most of the way to the ground, I suppose to ensure that the skirt stays out straight.

But that seems frightfully uncomfortable to sit on. I know the cage I'm planning will collapse to allow one to sit--the panniers did, too--but with the flat steel I'm thinking of using, I'll probably end up sitting on the edges of it if I do the boning all the way to the ground.

I assume this isn't a problem if one uses something like a plastic bone with a round cross-section but I'm on an extremely tight budget.

So my question is this: Must a cage bustle go all the way to the ground in back? I'm thinking of something with the bottom bone being about even with the bottom of my bum, which should mean that I can fold it up and out of the way behind me as I sit. Not sure I'll be able to recline, but at least I ought to be able to sit comfortably.

The fabric of the skirt will be cut out at an angle, to let it drape into gentle vertical folds, rather than straight down, and there will probably be at least one tier of ruffles at the bottom, so I don't think it'll end up tapering in towards me unless there's a stiff breeze. So I think I ought to be okay? But if anyone has any experience with short cage bustles and knows differently, I'd rather find out now before I start cutting! *Grin*

In other news, it ends up that Kingston has a Historical Costuming Club, with a particular area of interest of Victorian times. Hooray! I am attempting to get in touch with them; I imagine they ought to be able to give me some advice too, and besides, I am looking forwards to having people to talk shop with, as it were, and to wander about in costume with. Grin
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Unsubtle Pete
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England England


Discerning Scoundrel.


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« Reply #509 on: December 01, 2012, 11:01:19 am »

Bustle cages didn't always come near to the ankle, but you do risk the "sagging inwards below the cage" problem with a short one. Not as much as with a pad, though.





Edit - that one is, I think, only for museum display and doesn't collapse. Silly me  Embarrassed

Nonetheless, they existed, and more to the point, they work  Tongue The Mantua Maker bustle cage pattern includes a short example.
« Last Edit: December 01, 2012, 11:06:27 am by Unsubtle Pete » Logged

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Darkling
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United Kingdom United Kingdom


« Reply #510 on: December 01, 2012, 05:56:02 pm »

Have a look at the Truly Victorian petticoat patterns. I've just finished making the grand bustle one today. It was very straightforward to make although I have wrestled a bit with getting the boning into some of the channels. I used continuous flat steel boning for it and it seems to have worked fine.
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frances
Zeppelin Captain
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United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #511 on: December 01, 2012, 09:50:59 pm »

Hi,

Here are some bustle cages of the type you need for 1880's.

http://rivercrossinginc.tripod.com/bustle.html

You can make it out of wedding dress boning, crinoline steels, wire coat hangers, millinery wire,  plastic cable or anything that is stiffish.
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Anastacia
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United States United States



« Reply #512 on: December 02, 2012, 03:41:25 pm »

I've been on hiatus from sewing for some time now, but I think I'm ready to ease myself back into something.
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Kryss LaBryn
Snr. Officer
****
Canada Canada


aka Lady Amelia Cottington


« Reply #513 on: December 03, 2012, 12:42:56 am »

Ah! That's fantastic! That's exactly what I need. Thanks so much, everyone!

Hmm. You know, that 1880s bustle in that last link, it looks like it ought to fold up to a certain extent. There's an L-shaped piece of metal running along the very bottom of it, running through a single loop to form sort of a spring, and then continuing vertically up the part that runs along one's bum. It looks to me that, while generally being stiff, that loop (depending on the type of steel used) ought to both help stop weighty skits from bending the lot downwards and slightly collapsing the bustle; it ought to, to my mind (can't say positively of course without laying hands on it) also allow that bottom piece to be pressed up and in slightly when one sits, to have a bit of "give" to it, as it were, and then spring back down into the proper shape when one arises again. It's pretty much the same shape as my panniers, except with more boning. My panniers had no springs in them, though, so while the lot would fold up comfortably when one sat, when one stood again a certain amount of wiggling and adjusting of skirts would be necessary to jiggle them back into place, which of course was most undignified. That loop of spring ought to be enough to spring anything that had been pushed upwards back down into place, I think.

It also looks to me like the original was constructed of leather and some kind of flat bent wood; it reminds me of the steamed weed that my embroidery hoop is made of. If one wanted to do a period reconstruction, large wooden embroidery hoops cut into two (four, rather, since there are two hoops in the set) U's might be a decent source of boning for it. I'm not sure it'd be strong enough for regular wear, though. But those attachment points could certainly pivot if one did them right, allowing the piece to fold up either if pressed against a cushion or (more likely) for flat storage. Not sure it'd be good for the spring to be compressed for long periods of time, though.

Those pictures were just what I needed, thanks! Like an idiot I have pics of the finished outfit and of the other larger hoops I made, but not those particular panniers, which I have since given away. Bleah. Hey, one last question: The main part of the bustle ought to be about as wide as one's hips, I think, yes? No wider, of course, but not significantly narrower than the area to which it's attached? I ask because that would seem to make sense to me, but in the picture from River Crossing's website, with the model wearing it, it looks a fair bit narrower than her.

I am looking forward to getting the project under way! Oh! One last question: I will be in Toronto briefly in a few weeks; does anyone know of any fabric stores there I ought to particularly hit? Something like Dressew in Vancouver or Save On Fabrics in Surrey (both in BC)?

Thanks again for the responses! Just what I needed to hear.  Smiley
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Kryss LaBryn
Snr. Officer
****
Canada Canada


aka Lady Amelia Cottington


« Reply #514 on: December 03, 2012, 12:50:38 am »

Ah! Think I figured something else out. Was just looking at that loop of steel more closely, and while I still haven't figured out exactly where the ends are, it looks to me like the new version, at least, has something like a pair of shoelaces attached to that loop, I believe so one can control the width of the bustle. See, my panniers had hoops that were closed loops, rather than the open C's (or U's) the boning is in here. So that was never an issue; they'd be constructed to be a certain width, and there they'd stay, come what may. But without some kind of horizontal restraint along the bottom of the front (between the two loops), this design would spring out nearly flat. So the laces are there to tie it into an appropriate width, which is why their one is "one size fits most" and they only need your waist size and not your hip size; you adjust for hip size yourself when you get it.

Which means that I can go ahead and build it and only have to worry about leaving myself enough tape to get all the way around my waist even if I put a few pounds back on, and not have to worry about hip size at all. I'll just adjust until it looks right. Yay! Grin
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frances
Zeppelin Captain
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United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #515 on: December 03, 2012, 08:00:00 pm »

Kryss,

The tighter you pull the front laces the more the bustle sticks out at the back.  It is the laces that rest on the bum, the tapes go around the waist. 

The bustle cage is narrower than your hips as there is a lot of fabric that goes over it - petticoat, skirt and back bustle - that makes it all wider.
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Kryss LaBryn
Snr. Officer
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Canada Canada


aka Lady Amelia Cottington


« Reply #516 on: December 04, 2012, 03:54:44 pm »

Ah, yes, of course. I was thinking that since I wasn't planning on a lot of ruffles back there I should perhaps make it wider, but if one did have lots of lovely drapings and things then it would make sense that one would want the bustle itself to be a bit smaller so they didn't pouf out too much at the sides.

I am planning on a very simple aft section for this particular dress, so I may do it a bit wider; but with adjustable laces in there rather than the solid piece of steel I was originally planning on I can adjust it to suit. Which is fantastic. Grin
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Elycium
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addicted to fancy clothes

Elycium
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« Reply #517 on: December 19, 2012, 02:27:52 am »

I'm so close to being done with this. Still needs trim and a bunch of other details that need added, but still. Close

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Sorry, please ignore the state of my sewing room. I've been throwing together so many different things for different events that its a disaster ^^;
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LadyAsprin
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Scotland Scotland


Sabreuse.


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« Reply #518 on: December 19, 2012, 03:22:05 am »

I'm so close to being done with this. Still needs trim and a bunch of other details that need added, but still. Close

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Sorry, please ignore the state of my sewing room. I've been throwing together so many different things for different events that its a disaster ^^;


Nice, very simple from the front but detailed at the back.  Are you going to trim it with another colour?
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koeta
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Falcon in the dive


« Reply #519 on: December 19, 2012, 06:11:52 am »

I got my first corset today so I'm starting to feel inspired to make a skirt to go with it.  The corset is red and gold so I have plenty of colour options!  Perhaps this will finally get my sewing spirit back.
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Banfili
Zeppelin Admiral
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Australia Australia



« Reply #520 on: December 19, 2012, 11:48:17 am »

I impulse bought a new sewing machine - never do that kind of thing!
I'm not a 'natural' sewer, as I only made stuff because I didn't have any money, & a few years ago my old machine became unusable.

Saw an ad on TV & thought 'wow, I really like that'! Found a distributor a couple of hours travel away, rang 'em up & bought myself one, all in 5 minutes! The Singer 160 anniversary model. Suitably black & gold. Best part, I don't have to go & get it as I have friends coming down this weekend & one of them picked it up for me.
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Elycium
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addicted to fancy clothes

Elycium
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« Reply #521 on: December 19, 2012, 12:35:55 pm »

Lady Asprin, its going to be trimmed out on a lighter shade of green with silver accents. The hem of the skirt is also going to be trimmed out in white lace. Smiley
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frances
Zeppelin Captain
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United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #522 on: December 25, 2012, 09:04:27 pm »

Is it going to be based on any particular date in Victorian times or is it just out of your head?
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Wilhelmina Frame
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ptliontamer
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« Reply #523 on: January 03, 2013, 07:57:23 am »

Here is my latest -- a Rococopunk outfit. This is the first iteration. There is a lot of embellishment, accessorizing and a tricorn yet to be done.

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Sam Watson
Snr. Officer
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United States United States


Steampunk Cowboy


« Reply #524 on: January 03, 2013, 04:30:26 pm »

I'm just starting on a self-drafted frock coat. It will be made in herringbone linen, and made entirely by hand. Here's a very un-exciting photo of me basting up the test muslin.

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