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Author Topic: Are you sewing anything right now? Mk II  (Read 68366 times)
Darkling
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« Reply #475 on: November 04, 2012, 11:51:47 am »

http://www.flickr.com/photos/feltmistress/1903000131/#

^^^^^This type of fabric is what we know as calico.
I think in most fabric shops in the UK we don't generally make much of a distinction between different types of cottons - well not in my local shop anyway. (I'm not being very helpful here am I?)


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Miss Groves
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« Reply #476 on: November 04, 2012, 01:16:31 pm »

this is where the wonderful changes in language just don't help us now XD
We DID use small print cottons for day dresses from probably before 1860's till whenever the fashion died out.
The biggest problem with the victorians is that they had a name of each type of fabric depending on colour, finish, where it was made, how it was woven.
Muslin, dimity, chintz are common words to describe them.

the Dictionary of Needlework 1882 says that there are over 1500 different types (mostly based from manchester) produced in the UK alone without including those produced by india, usa, egypt etc
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ktara
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« Reply #477 on: November 04, 2012, 05:09:36 pm »

http://www.flickr.com/photos/feltmistress/1903000131/#

^^^^^This type of fabric is what we know as calico.
I think in most fabric shops in the UK we don't generally make much of a distinction between different types of cottons - well not in my local shop anyway. (I'm not being very helpful here am I?)





I like that calico Smiley  I really don't like most of the prints available--they're too busy for my taste.
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Ms Pipistrelle
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« Reply #478 on: November 05, 2012, 06:34:46 pm »



from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calico_%28textile%29:
Quote
In the US:
    Calico—cotton fabric with a small, all-over floral print
    Muslin—simple, cheap equal weft and warp plain weave fabric in white, cream or unbleached cotton and/or a very fine, light plain weave cotton fabric (sometimes called muslin gauze).
    Muslin gauze—the very lightest, most open weave of muslin.
    Gauze—any very light fabric, generally with a plain weave
    Cheesecloth—extremely soft and fine cotton fabric with a very open plain weave.

In the UK, Australia and New Zealand:

    Calico—simple, cheap equal weft and warp plain weave fabric in white, cream or unbleached cotton.
    Muslin—a very fine, light plain weave cotton fabric.
    Muslin gauze—muslin.
    Gauze—extremely soft and fine cotton fabric with a very open plain weave.
    Cheesecloth—gauze.

Printed calico was imported into the United States from Lancashire in the 1780s, and here a linguistic separation occurred, while Europe maintained the word calico for the fabric, in the States it was used to refer to the printed design.


So I think here we're talking about a cotton fabric with a small, all-over floral print.  I think we need an international fabric terms dictionary!

Getting back to the original subject - you might like to search for pictures from the BBC tv drama "The Paradise" which is set in the 1870s or 1890s - maybe something there will give you ideas?  This might be a start
« Last Edit: November 05, 2012, 06:49:51 pm by Ms Pipistrelle » Logged
Sam Watson
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« Reply #479 on: November 05, 2012, 08:00:16 pm »

I just need to sew buttonholes and buttons on my waistcoat, and then it's finished.

Once again, all linen, all hand-sewn, my own design.

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Samuel Xavier Watson
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« Reply #480 on: November 06, 2012, 12:46:29 am »

Very nice, Sam - you wield a nifty needle!
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frances
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« Reply #481 on: November 07, 2012, 03:06:59 pm »

Nice neat pockets.
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Unsubtle Pete
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« Reply #482 on: November 08, 2012, 02:18:55 am »

That is very nice indeed, Sam. Seconding Frances's comments about the pockets, and the collar and lapels behave perfectly.



I, meanwhile, have started experimenting with steel.
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Wilhelmina Frame
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« Reply #483 on: November 08, 2012, 05:30:22 am »

Here are the last things I've finished:

My nerfpunk gown -- where you match your outfit to the nerf gun versus the other way around. it's got a full train made from the orange & yellow with red pinstriped wood grain fabric.



Asylum Ball Gown -- I made this with expertise and encouragement from my friend Anthony Canney of House of Canney. I don't think I could have cut into the silk without his help! He taught me a lot in the process and helped me design the dress. We free styled starting with an 1899 fashion plate but the dress changed a lot from there. It's somewhere between turn of the century and old hollywood. I had Bionic Unicorn custom make the necklace and earrings. The other jewelry is vintage. I'll be wearing this again at Teslacon. I wish I had more places to wear it!



Both photos by the superb Soulstealer Photography.
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« Reply #484 on: November 08, 2012, 06:04:18 am »

Wow!
They are beautiful frocks!
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Sam Watson
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« Reply #485 on: November 08, 2012, 04:26:24 pm »



I very much like the falling pleats on the sides of the skirt - and how the fabric and lining match the colours of the underskirt.
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« Reply #486 on: November 08, 2012, 04:30:56 pm »



I very much like the falling pleats on the sides of the skirt - and how the fabric and lining match the colours of the underskirt.

My husband bought all of the fabric for that dress and gave it to me as a Christmas gift. he picked it out himself. he has an excellent eye but then he is a furniture designer.
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Kryss LaBryn
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« Reply #487 on: November 08, 2012, 07:32:36 pm »

Wow, those are gorgeous! I love that silk!

Sam, I envy you your welts. I originally planned to do them on my own vest but in the end decided they terrified me too much.  Grin Very nice job!

Thanks all for your replies! Yes, the calico I meant is the North American one, with the little flowers. Usually I don't like it as a general rule (I think I associate it too much with the Old West, which to my subconscious makes it perfectly acceptable for that application and slightly suspect for anything else, I think) but I came across some nice ones as options for dresses being sold online and am thinking it might make a nice summer dress. However, the fabric selection locally is somewhat restricted (looks like it mainly caters to the quilting set). But I did find a nice almost-calico in three complementing patterns (a calico, matching calico-with-stripes, and matching larger version of the pattern), which is making me wonder if I can work stripes into it somewhere. Or rather, which fabric goes where, lol.

I came across this dress here which is very much the look I want. It'll be a fun project! I suppose I'll have to sew a bustle and a petticoat too, sigh. Busy busy! --Once I actually start, that is lol.

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Sam Watson
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« Reply #488 on: November 08, 2012, 08:16:36 pm »

Sam, I envy you your welts. I originally planned to do them on my own vest but in the end decided they terrified me too much.  Grin Very nice job!


Refer to my welt pocket tutorial. Easy, even when hand-sewn like mine. Will also work if you use a machine (though you should hand sew the last step, felling and prick stitching the welt to the front).
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Hez
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« Reply #489 on: November 08, 2012, 11:40:03 pm »

Madame Frame - Tres, tres belle.
Miss LaBryn - look up sprigged muslin dresses.  A must for every Victorian young lady and not too different from some of the calico's although of a lighter and more fragile fabric.
the one on the left
and some period printed cottons from England
and another
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Banfili
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« Reply #490 on: November 08, 2012, 11:43:37 pm »

Sprigged muslin - just the words I was trying to think of!
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Kryss LaBryn
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« Reply #491 on: November 10, 2012, 05:07:17 pm »

Ooh, I've heard of sprigged muslin! Yes, that seems to be the stuff!

I've actually got to go into town in a bit; think I'll borrow Hubby's cell and drop by the Fabricland and take some pics of the three fabrics I'm looking at (assuming they still have any).
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ktara
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« Reply #492 on: November 10, 2012, 10:32:06 pm »

I just found this at a local thrift shop in their fabric section, but I think it's a sheet.  That got me to thinking "sheets are cheaper than buying fabric (in some places) and they're a good size to work with."

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Banfili
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« Reply #493 on: November 11, 2012, 12:11:48 am »

From the look of it it's more likely to be a curtain, but it's a lovely looking piece of fabric.

In my days of more abject poverty I made trousers out of sheets - good, strong, violently floral ones!
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frances
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« Reply #494 on: November 11, 2012, 12:36:06 am »

The best in fabric bargains are duvet covers at a charity shop. 

I often make outfits out of my old poly-cotton sheets when they will need to be washed a lot.  I have changed to colour of my bedroom so now have all sorts of colours in the linen cupboard. You can get a top out of two pillow-cases as well. In shop sales they come in such pretty colours and now you can get them with embroidery on them too.
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ktara
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« Reply #495 on: November 11, 2012, 02:09:49 am »

From the look of it it's more likely to be a curtain, but it's a lovely looking piece of fabric.

In my days of more abject poverty I made trousers out of sheets - good, strong, violently floral ones!

It's very thin, like cotton, and it's got hems like sheets have, not open like a curtain would.

The best in fabric bargains are duvet covers at a charity shop. 

I often make outfits out of my old poly-cotton sheets when they will need to be washed a lot.  I have changed to colour of my bedroom so now have all sorts of colours in the linen cupboard. You can get a top out of two pillow-cases as well. In shop sales they come in such pretty colours and now you can get them with embroidery on them too.

A top from a pillowcase?  Cool Smiley 
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Marasi
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« Reply #496 on: November 11, 2012, 09:43:52 pm »

I've taken the plunge and bought a sewing machine. I've never sewed more than a hem or two and some buttons in my life, so I'm very much learning on the job! Currently sewing a skirt (nearly finished), a coat (everything done but the sleeves) and a bolero (with the Bolero tune running round and round in my head).
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Lady Toadflinger
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« Reply #497 on: November 12, 2012, 03:11:48 am »

Really cheap sheets from the thrift store are also great for making mock-ups of new patterns. I look in the area where the "pet blankets" and "painter's drop cloths" are. Some of these cost as little as 50 cents! Who cares if they are stained or ugly?
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D.Oakes
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« Reply #498 on: November 16, 2012, 03:51:46 am »

I recently got the crazy idea to invent a tactical waistcoat.  I have the drawing in my head and the actual piece almost done as far as basic construction is concerned.
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« Reply #499 on: November 20, 2012, 04:34:34 pm »

I've lost a decent amount of weight in the past 6-8 months so the other night I dug out a bunch of clothes I'd been holding on to to see if they fit. One of the things was an old ren faire costume I made in 2003 for a friend's wedding. It was one of my early more "complicated" projects due to the boning and grommets. All things considered -- it doesn't look that bad, although I doubt I'd actually wear it exactly as is to a ren faire.



Also, don't remember ever posting the Pinup Batgirl costume I made for Dragon*Con. I wore it over the weekend to a nightclub event.

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