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Author Topic: Are you sewing anything right now? Mk II  (Read 68332 times)
Sam Watson
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United States United States


Steampunk Cowboy


« Reply #450 on: October 19, 2012, 08:28:36 pm »

I've begun work on a waistcoat in green linen. I drafted the pattern myself, but I think it'll work out! It will be fully canvassed and lined. Here are all the pocket pieces laid out.

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Samuel Xavier Watson
Darkling
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United Kingdom United Kingdom


« Reply #451 on: October 19, 2012, 10:12:01 pm »

When you say the back of the skirt - do you have a skirt with a bustle over the top, ie two separate skirt pieces, or is the bustle piece the back panel of the skirt.

If you put a bustle pad under the the back of a skirt then it will lift the skirt up so that the hem is usually by 4 or 5 inches high.  If this is a separate bustle that goes over a skirt it does not matter if it is higher. 

If this is part of the skirt then you will have to lengthen it.  This is best done at the waist end so that any seams and tucks disappear into the rest of the bustle fabric folds.  If you have already sewn it and are reluctant to unpick the two seams then you could lengthen the bustle by adding rows of pleats of different styles.

Is that clear?

It's a Truly Victorian pattern I'm using, TV 208, the trained skirt. I have mostly made the hooped bustle petticoat to go underneath it. I was just amused that when I held the piece up, it was nearly as tall as me! When it's all finished I expect that only about a foot or so of it will be on the floor due to all the gubbinses underneath. (Although I am not gifted in the height department so it may be a little more.) Just waiting the arrival of a pleating gadget so I can get going with the decoration.
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Unsubtle Pete
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England England


Discerning Scoundrel.


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« Reply #452 on: October 22, 2012, 07:41:44 pm »

Have just started making a coat loosely inspired by the one on the left.



The image is from Minister's Gazette of Fashion, 1870, but the coat is going to be different in as number of ways.

Firstly, I won't be using period tailoring techniques.

Secondly, it will not be cut in the 1870s fashion. 1870s coats, AFAICT, tend to have a lot of spring below the waist in the side seam and shift most of the waist suppression to the blade seam. I've never cut that way before, and don't feel the urge right now as I'm getting quite happy with the way I cut coats now. The tails and shape of cutaway will be a little different too. It was going to be 4x4 button stance, but before making the buttonholes I decided I preferred 4X2.

My version will also use more velvet embellishments - as well as the collar, velvet will be used to cover the buttons and make the pocket flaps. The rest will be in a pure wool dark green herringbone cloth. Not felt this excited about a project for quite some time   Cheesy .
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Sam Watson
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States


Steampunk Cowboy


« Reply #453 on: October 22, 2012, 08:00:59 pm »

Have just started making a coat loosely inspired by the one on the left.



The image is from Minister's Gazette of Fashion, 1870, but the coat is going to be different in as number of ways.

Firstly, I won't be using period tailoring techniques.

Secondly, it will not be cut in the 1870s fashion. 1870s coats, AFAICT, tend to have a lot of spring below the waist in the side seam and shift most of the waist suppression to the blade seam. I've never cut that way before, and don't feel the urge right now as I'm getting quite happy with the way I cut coats now. The tails and shape of cutaway will be a little different too. It was going to be 4x4 button stance, but before making the buttonholes I decided I preferred 4X2.

My version will also use more velvet embellishments - as well as the collar, velvet will be used to cover the buttons and make the pocket flaps. The rest will be in a pure wool dark green herringbone cloth. Not felt this excited about a project for quite some time   Cheesy .


Will you be binding the edges as shown? If you want more velvet you could use it there. I'm starting to quite like that look, and will likely do it with the next coat I make.
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Unsubtle Pete
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England England


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« Reply #454 on: October 22, 2012, 09:22:59 pm »

Have just started making a coat loosely inspired by the one on the left.



The image is from Minister's Gazette of Fashion, 1870, but the coat is going to be different in as number of ways.

Firstly, I won't be using period tailoring techniques.

Secondly, it will not be cut in the 1870s fashion. 1870s coats, AFAICT, tend to have a lot of spring below the waist in the side seam and shift most of the waist suppression to the blade seam. I've never cut that way before, and don't feel the urge right now as I'm getting quite happy with the way I cut coats now. The tails and shape of cutaway will be a little different too. It was going to be 4x4 button stance, but before making the buttonholes I decided I preferred 4X2.

My version will also use more velvet embellishments - as well as the collar, velvet will be used to cover the buttons and make the pocket flaps. The rest will be in a pure wool dark green herringbone cloth. Not felt this excited about a project for quite some time   Cheesy .


Will you be binding the edges as shown? If you want more velvet you could use it there. I'm starting to quite like that look, and will likely do it with the next coat I make.


Not on this coat, but am considering a bound coat. This started off as "That looks rather nice" and quickly devolved into me cutting a coat that, while nice, doesn't much resemble the one that inspired it  Wink
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SweetestPoison
Zeppelin Captain
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United Kingdom United Kingdom

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« Reply #455 on: October 23, 2012, 07:54:35 pm »

the costume is nearing completion... waistband needs finished, some hemming and closures need to be put in. Also, that isn't a blouse, it's my nightie ^^

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ktara
Officer
***
Canada Canada



« Reply #456 on: October 23, 2012, 09:36:55 pm »

Oh, a nightie...What a good idea for a blouse, with some alteration.  I've been looking for a "peasant" blouse for a while, but I haven't found one.  Thank you for the idea Smiley
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Unsubtle Pete
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« Reply #457 on: October 23, 2012, 09:58:14 pm »

SweetestPoison, that is looking very good.

Meanwhile my Morning Coat has varied some more compared to the original plan. The plan was to copy the button stance and skirt design from the inspiration. I decided, however, to change the skirts so they broke lower, as this is a winter Morning Coat and having the skirts break below the waist seam would provide a bit more warmth. Then I decided to go from 4x4 to 4x2 button stance, as I preferred the lower roll. Then I deleted the top pair of buttons. Then I added another pair of buttons, returning it to 4x4, but rather lower (quite like the frock coat in the picture, in fact, but the difference between the top and bottom button spacing is more pronounced).

This is why I like making things for myself - designs can evolve. I now have a nearly finished morning coat, needing only cuff buttons and some work on the lining  Cheesy. Pics will follow when it is fully complete.
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D.Oakes
Zeppelin Admiral
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United States United States



« Reply #458 on: October 23, 2012, 11:43:51 pm »

Guess I need to start doing full scale manufacturing of these:


Made my first one after midnight last night and ended up getting a custom order...literally on the street...made it and sold it in 3 hours.  They burn through more of one kind of material than the kepi (whereas a kepi requires cotton liner, wool shell, leather, painted canvas...etc), but take a lot less time even when hand stitched.  And they seem to have the potential to sell better as winter caps, nightcaps, and as my primary purpose of the early war Confederate Sicilian cap which was worn into combat. 

I think tonight will be sewing poke sacks and housewives. 
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Sam Watson
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States


Steampunk Cowboy


« Reply #459 on: October 24, 2012, 06:52:27 pm »

I finished the pad stitching on the lapel of my waistcoat. When I ordered this linen thread it said it was "light green". I didn't realise that meant "mint dental floss electric green."

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Anastacia
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United States United States



« Reply #460 on: October 25, 2012, 03:50:12 am »

I suppose compared to a hunter green, it's a light green?
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SweetestPoison
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« Reply #461 on: October 25, 2012, 04:55:15 pm »

I've finished! and with almost a week to go to hallowe'en, too!

with a proper blouse this time, the skirt with petticoat underneath from the front...

and the back!

a little saucy side-eye ^^

and the whole shebang, with a quizzical look and an as of yet elastic-less and therefore teetering tophat ^^

just as info, this is the panel I took inspiration from:

of course it's not an exact replica, as I needed to move swiftly. But I'm hoping the red scarf is enough of a giveaway, plus there will be liquid latex scarred nastiness underneath to reveal to chosen gentlemen ^^
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Darkling
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United Kingdom United Kingdom


« Reply #462 on: October 28, 2012, 07:20:12 pm »

Yesterday I pleated 10 metres of trim for my bustle skirt. It's weight seems to have tripled already and I still have at least one more tier of pleating to do.
Incidentally, pleating takes ages, is somewhat boring and smells funny! (I'm using a vinegar solution to set the pleats.)
I'm really looking forward to getting this project completed though  Smiley
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Unsubtle Pete
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« Reply #463 on: October 28, 2012, 08:12:11 pm »

The coat I was going on about, still not finished.



Needs work on the lining, cuff buttons and a final press. That and my hair not obscuring the collar  Embarrassed. Still, it is getting there.
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Banfili
Zeppelin Admiral
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Australia Australia



« Reply #464 on: October 29, 2012, 12:30:22 am »

Nice one, Unsubtle - I like the colour, too!
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frances
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United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #465 on: October 29, 2012, 09:33:39 pm »

"I'm using a vinegar solution to set the pleats."

I've heard mention of this in a couple of places.  Does it work Darkling - do the pleats stay in?  Are you steaming the pleats too?  I'm really interested to know whether this works.
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Darkling
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« Reply #466 on: October 30, 2012, 10:32:30 pm »

"I'm using a vinegar solution to set the pleats."

I've heard mention of this in a couple of places.  Does it work Darkling - do the pleats stay in?  Are you steaming the pleats too?  I'm really interested to know whether this works.

Yes, it works brilliantly. I used white vinegar/water, in a spray bottle (I used an empty shower cleaner thingy). I pushed the fabric into the louvres of the pleater, sprayed it, laid a pressing cloth over it and pressed. It steams itself so to speak. You have to leave the fabric in the pleater until it's completely cooled to help set the pleats. It takes ages to do, but I think it's worth it.
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frances
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United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #467 on: October 30, 2012, 10:36:26 pm »

Oh! what sort of pleater do you have?
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Darkling
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« Reply #468 on: October 31, 2012, 09:15:56 pm »

I got a perfect pleater, not widely available in the UK. I got mine from ebay US.
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D.Oakes
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United States United States



« Reply #469 on: November 01, 2012, 01:23:38 am »

This is everything I've been sewing lately...well almost everything. 


Spoiler (click to show/hide)
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Banfili
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Australia Australia



« Reply #470 on: November 01, 2012, 02:38:08 am »

Very nice work, D. Oakes - You have been a busy boy!
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Kryss LaBryn
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Canada Canada


aka Lady Amelia Cottington


« Reply #471 on: November 03, 2012, 04:11:30 pm »

I am beginning to sort out a winter sewing project: a new dress for me, and one for my little daughter.

I have my tramping-about-the-countryside outfit; now I think I want a nice dress for afternoon teas on the lawn. I'm thinking a pretty straightforward late-1800s design, with leg o' mutton sleeves, fitted bodice with buttons down the front (and perhaps some angled pin-tucks across the chest), and a proper bustle. I think the skirt itself will go over the bustle, but there will also be something like a polonaise overskirt turned ninety degrees over it as well.

If anyone remembers it, I really liked one dress (well, okay, I liked them all but this is the one I got the idea from) in Bram Stoker's Dracula, the one Mina visits Renfield in (of which, of course, I cannot find any pictures  Roll Eyes ). It had a sort of gathered apron in front, and a bustle. I'm thinking something like that, in that it will have sort of an aprony-thing over the bustle, and another one in front. When I am not supposed to be doing chores instead I will scan in my sketches, lol.

For my little girl I am going with a more traditional Victorian girl's dress, with short puffy sleeves, and a long skirt gathered into an Empire waist. It will also have a petticoat, pantaloons, and pinafore.

Now, what I could use a bit of help with is this: Did the British ever use calico prints? It being a slightly informal dress (as I said, one for afternoon tea rather than a fancy evening gown) I want to go with a lighter cotton, and I've seen some very pretty calicoes. But all the "Victorian" calico dresses I've seen online seem to be American cuts, or more 1830s than 1880s. Does anyone know if a British lady in a British-style bustle dress made out of a cotton calico would be horribly out of place?

I haven't even quite finalized the design let alone started making the patterns, so I'm probably a couple of months away from actually going and buying the fabric, so I have some time to decide on it. And of course part of the whole ~punk thing is that if I want calico, then, dammit, I get to use calico.  Grin But if I'm going wildly against the fashion trends of the day then I'd at least like to do so consciously, lol.
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"Be clean and courteous; raise your hat, And wipe your boots upon the mat: Such proofs of gentlemanly feeling Are to the ladies most appealing." The Professor's Manuscript - Dorothy L. Sayers
Darkling
Officer
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United Kingdom United Kingdom


« Reply #472 on: November 03, 2012, 11:49:58 pm »

I am beginning to sort out a winter sewing project: a new dress for me, and one for my little daughter
<snip>
Now, what I could use a bit of help with is this: Did the British ever use calico prints? It being a slightly informal dress (as I said, one for afternoon tea rather than a fancy evening gown) I want to go with a lighter cotton, and I've seen some very pretty calicoes. But all the "Victorian" calico dresses I've seen online seem to be American cuts, or more 1830s than 1880s. Does anyone know if a British lady in a British-style bustle dress made out of a cotton calico would be horribly out of place?


I think we use a different name for calico in the UK to the US. To a Brit, calico is an unbleached medium/heavyweight unbleached cotton tht is a bit slubby. I'm presuming this isn't what you mean? Do you have any photos?
At the end of the day, it's entirely your take isn't it?
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Aodahn A. Steamlink
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United States United States


« Reply #473 on: November 04, 2012, 06:12:02 am »

It is not necessarily a consistent project, but I have decided to attempt a recreation of a gleeman's cloak on my pants. I hope to eventually a cloak and shirt, as the holes pop up.
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ktara
Officer
***
Canada Canada



« Reply #474 on: November 04, 2012, 07:23:57 am »

This is what we call calico fabric in the states (the patterned pics, not the plain ones):  https://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=calico&um=1&ie=UTF-8&tbm=isch&source=og&sa=N&tab=wi&ei=NwqWUIq1LaKRiQKyjIHgAQ&biw=1133&bih=427&sei=OwqWUKiXPMXZigKq7oD4Dg#um=1&hl=en&safe=off&tbm=isch&sa=1&q=calico+fabric&oq=calico+fabric&gs_l=img.3..0l2j0i5j0i24l7.3010.5112.0.5135.7.7.0.0.0.0.1290.1652.4j1j7-1.6.0...0.0...1c.1.c-mLsibbK1c&pbx=1&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_qf.&fp=9acd86c284655be9&bpcl=37189454&biw=1133&bih=427
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