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Author Topic: James' non-SP model building thread  (Read 162797 times)
James Harrison
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« Reply #2275 on: December 17, 2018, 07:37:09 pm »

You're close...

From the Great Eastern Railway society website:

"The actual blue colour used was a pure ultramarine blue - a tin of which is in the GERS Collection. When painted over the French grey undercoat and varnished this gave a very deep, rich blue. The two preserved GER locomotives 87 and 490 were painted in a rather muddy shade, and thus do not give a true representation of the finished effect."

Which would be RAL 5002.  I think the critical thing is the undercoat, I remember one of my locos when first built had a very drab and lacklustre appearance, when I rebuilt it (which also meant a repaint) I found that using the same paint over a light grey priming coat resulted in a marvellous and lively-looking sheen to the final finish.

You might be interested to hear one of the surviving GER engines made it into the news recently when some nutter drove into it at a level crossing. 



Luckily no real damage was caused (to the locomotive) but the value of this photo really is it's a good picture of the livery and lining- look how deep the black edging is around the tender panels and the radius of the curve to the red lining. 
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Persons intending to travel by open carriage should select a seat with their backs to the engine, by which means they will avoid the ashes emitted therefrom, that in travelling generally, but particularly through the tunnels, prove a great annoyance; the carriage farthest from the engine will in consequence be found the most desirable.
The Bullet
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Germany Germany



« Reply #2276 on: December 17, 2018, 09:05:47 pm »

Looks like she was running tender first at the time of impact.
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James Harrison
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Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #2277 on: December 17, 2018, 09:32:57 pm »

I believe that was the case.  Which led to various armchair drivers (both of cars and locomotives) arguing that the crew couldn't see that there was a car coming... which is an irrelevant point as in the UK the train always has right of way... also neatly overlooking the fact that visibility when running tender first on that locomotive is actually better than running forwards!
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James Harrison
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« Reply #2278 on: December 18, 2018, 09:32:57 pm »



Flagstones are progressing, slowly.  11 runs of them last night and another 15/16 tonight, leaves 11 or 12 to go until the main platform is complete (for a given value of).  Then the down platform to do too...

The hope is still that I'll be able to start ballasting the track in time for Christmas.  But these stages are slow, tedious, mind-numbingly boring and require quite literally hours of just sitting there and 'switching off' and mindlessly laying slabs or lumps of grit. 

I'm looking forward, in the new year, to cracking on with the cutting and retaining walls. 
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The Bullet
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Germany Germany



« Reply #2279 on: December 19, 2018, 08:59:00 am »

Good work James.
I remember building the cab of the Bavarian monster.
about 480 rivet-head screws, M2 size, were required to imitate the rows of rivets on the cab.
This took weeks but also kept me fit as every session ended with me crawling under the bench, picking up the tiny M2 nuts I had dropped while assembling.

Last day of work for this year. More time for the workshop now (hopefully).

Claud needs a bit of work on two eccentric straps. Then you can come over and paint this thing    
;-)

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James Harrison
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Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #2280 on: December 19, 2018, 08:52:32 pm »

One platform paved.  A little respite now I think, before ploughing on with the down platform tomorrow night. 
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James Harrison
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« Reply #2281 on: December 20, 2018, 09:39:12 pm »

Both platforms paved.  Next stage: weathering and final colouring. 

Then on to the ballast!
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James Harrison
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Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #2282 on: December 22, 2018, 11:49:12 am »

Efforts last night were to reballast one or two bald spots on the platforms and relay the up road, which for some reason had kinked a bit and sprung up off the trackbed.  To rectify this meant taking one of the rails out of the chairs and then painstakingly rethreading it.  Which worked but I'd really sooner not have to do it again. 

Anyway, that took up my allotted half hour/ three quarters of an hour daily modelling session so I called it a day at that point, but made a decision on something I've been considering for some time- signalling. 

CfP is a simple wayside station, no crossovers, no sidings, so the debate was whether signals are required or not.  More accurately, the debate centred on whether block signalling worked on a station to station basis, or whether a station might reasonably be located mid-block and thus rely just on the train guard ordering the train away.  As is usual in these situations, research provides the answer and the answer in that case is that each station appears to have been a block post with a signal cabin.  Which seems rather extravagant in such situations as Carrington or Belgrave and Birstall stations, but it is what it is. 

This of course led on to further research about signals, luckily in the back of volume 3 of George Dow's Great Central there are a number of drawings of signalling equipment.  I don't rate my chances at all of being able to scratchbuild working signals!- but they did look a little familiar somehow, and I found out why when idly browsing through a Ratio catalogue.  They are incredibly similar to the Great Western square post type, the only difference I can see being the location of the counterweights on the post.  On the GC they are about halfway up the post; on the GW they're at the bottom.  That's a compromise I can live with. 

Ultimately I think CfP is going to require probably 4 signals, a distant and a home in each direction.  Prototypically you'd expect 4 in each direction, of the order distant-home (platforms) home- distant, which taken in order tell you station ahead, station right here, right away from the platform and then whether the road to the next station is clear.  The problem is that those four signals cover a length of somewhere in the order of 3/4 of a mile!
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James Harrison
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Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #2283 on: December 23, 2018, 04:14:14 pm »





Ballasting happened.... tiny grit chippings fixed down with diluted PVA glue.  I was expecting this to be a tedious task and wasn't disappointed, getting the stuff roughly right was easy enough but then to get the steam age look of neatly manicured ballast tightly packed around the sleepers, without actually rising over and above them, took some time with fingertips and a brush and much pushing and chivvying it back and forth, hither and thither.  Once I had an appearance I was happy with, only to spot several thin patches.  Out came the bag of ballast again, and away went the neat look again.  Eventually I got it right, for a given value of, and then it got fixed down.  When that has dried out I'll be going back and touching in any bald spots and trying to sort out the worst areas where it's sitting on the sleepers. 
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Mercury Wells
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I insiste that you do call me WELLS. :)


« Reply #2284 on: December 24, 2018, 12:36:56 am »

Good work & nice perspective.  Smiley
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James Harrison
Immortal
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Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #2285 on: December 25, 2018, 01:43:36 pm »

I'll be taking a break from Cremorne for Pittance over Christmas whilst I do my annual Christmas Week Small Project, my last bit of work on it yesterday was to scratch the ballast off the sleepers and give it a further dosing of PVA glue to set everything rock solid.  It now needs to be left to dry out thoroughly as (last night) I had a very soggy spongey trackbed. 

Christmas Week Project!

A pair of London & North Western Railway open wagons and a Midland Railway covered van.  There are, broadly, three types of wagon that I need for Rufford: 1) GCR- owned vehicles; 2) stock belonging to other railways; 3) private owner coal wagons.  Roughly the ratio between the three sorts should be of the order 2:1:2- in fact the private owners I might need fewer because that ratio is skewed somewhat by trains of 40 of the things running between colliery and user.... whilst Rufford will only have a modest coal yard.... well to start with anyway. 

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The Bullet
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****
Germany Germany



« Reply #2286 on: December 26, 2018, 11:40:24 am »

You all know that some "temporary solution" can easily become a permanent one.
So were my three portable track panels that connect the layout to the cellar window.
They had become a constant source of problems.
One joint was only done by a shackle, allowing the two track ends to tilt sideways causing derailments.
The other had two lugs that "aligned" one panel to the other (more or less).
I made them about 8 years ago just to have something that works. They have wooden sleepers with the rails just screwed on.
The intention was to improve later.... this never happened.
Now all panels have a steel sleeper at the end (keeping the gauge) and big pieces of angle iron for alignment.

Again: moving 3m track panels around in my small workshop is not easy. It becomes even more difficult when two panels need to go end to end for alignment checks. So I opened the the window (facing the street), pushed one panel outside so just the end was inside the workshop, put the other end on blocks of wood, clamped the two panels together and welded the brackets to one side.
I got some strange looks from people taking a walk outside.....

Now all panels have the proper gauge and lock to each other. This should last for some time.

Time to put the Claud back together.
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James Harrison
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Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #2287 on: December 26, 2018, 01:10:46 pm »

I struggle enough with 1-yard lengths of flexi-track!  Cheesy 

Good work. 
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The Bullet
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****
Germany Germany



« Reply #2288 on: December 26, 2018, 03:35:40 pm »

GAH!
Tidied up inside the smokebox, reassembled snifting valves, fitted pipework, injectors, whistle, pressure gauges for boiler and steamchest,....
LAST thing to do was to fit the hand pump pipe to the clack at the backhead. After that was done I wanted to see if the pipe was really secured.
*crack*
Clack valve broke off.
GAH!
i managed to get the remaining thread out of the boiler using my special method:
choosing a torx bit of the right size (just does not fit into hole), give it a few taps with the hammer, just enough to drive the bit into the hole,
unscrew the remaining thread.
Now I can forget about having the Claud in running order until January 4th. I will then use the Minx.
Good side: cab is still off, I only need to order an new clack and put it in.
Could have been much worse: breaking under steam pressure when running the loco.

So she will leave the shop half-assembled.
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James Harrison
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Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #2289 on: December 26, 2018, 04:54:58 pm »

That would have been a nasty accident had she been in steam.  A really nasty accident.  'Good' news it sounds like a relatively minor/ easy fix. 
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The Bullet
Snr. Officer
****
Germany Germany



« Reply #2290 on: December 27, 2018, 11:10:27 pm »

No, this is popular belief but in 5" gauge things are not that dangerous.
A friend managed to crack the gauge glass with the shovel.
Lots of steam, the loco hissing loudly but no scalded fingers, nothing.
10 cms from the fitting, the steam was cold enough to hold my finger into it.
Half an hour later we had put in a new glass and fired up again.

Except for the cab the Claud is back together.
I need to get a new clack valve....
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James Harrison
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Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #2291 on: December 28, 2018, 01:37:36 pm »

:O  My word.  More an annoyance than dangerous then. 

Christmas Week Project has crept a little.  I found a resin kit for a Metropolitan Railway covered van that I bought several years ago, made a half-hearted start on, then forgot about.  Half an hour later the roof was fitted, couplings were fitted, I'd sourced some new buffers (the resin originals had crumbled) and glued the bodywork to the chassis. 

Then these three were taken into the paintshops, first fix painting all round.  The LNWR opens were given a dark grey wash inside and out, the Met van got a first coat of light grey.  Plans for this afternoon?  Finish painting the LNWR opens and proceed with the Met van.  At this rate the other van of the project might actually get started (we'll see about finished) by the end of the holidays next week. 
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James Harrison
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« Reply #2292 on: December 30, 2018, 03:03:08 pm »

The two LNWR open wagons are now finished, the Metropolitan covered van is built and painted and just requires lettering (as it turns out, you can't get transfers for Metropolitan goods stock so I'm pondering how to sort that out) and the Midland covered van has been started.   



Oh, I say, now what is this?  It's from an online railway atlas, and it shows the historical railways around Mansfield.  Blue lines are those belonging to the Great Central, yellow are those belonging to the Midland and red are those belonging to the Great Northern.  This particular area around Sheffield and Nottingham, the three existed pretty much cheek-by-jowl.  The Midland lines around Mansfield date back to about 1848, the Great Northern lines are later and last of all are the Great Central lines, most of which aren't proper Great Central.  The east-west route through Scarfliffe, Langwith, Edwinstowe and Ollerton was actually built by the Lancashire, Derbyshire and East Coast company in the mid-1890s and was subsumed into the GC in 1906, having failed to make it either to Derbyshire or the East Coast.  The line heading north from Upper Langwith is the Sheffield District Railway, which have the LDEC access to Sheffield via that city's Midland Railway station.  The triangular junction at Kings Clipstone and the line from it heading south is the Mansfield Railway, which at its southern end connected with the Great Central's London extension.  It was a completely independant line but operated by the GC, and was only completed in 1916. 



The same area but at a smaller scale to show where it all goes.  So you see the Lancashire, Derbyshire & East Coast in it's entirety- a 55 or so mile run between Chesterfield and Lincoln, where it joined the Great Northern/ Great Eastern joint, with a line heading north-west up to Sheffield.  Coming south you see the Mansfield running down to link with the GCML- which runs down through Nottingham right hard by a Great Northern line, and then you see that Great Northern line heading off to the west, where it ran to Derby, Uttoxeter and Stafford.  You see a confused mass of Midland lines around Nottingham- east to Lincoln, west to Derby, south to London and north principally to Mansfield, Chesterfield, Sheffield and then onwards toward York and Leeds. 

Now look just to the south east of Sheffield.  There's a point called Beighton, where the Midland and the Great Central meet.  It's also where the LDEC's branch to Sheffield comes in.  If we head east and west of that point we are on the original GC mainline of the 1840s- going west on Sheffield, Ashton-Under-Lyme and Manchester Railway metals over the Peak District to Manchester and (via various joint lines and bought companies) to Liverpool, Chester and into North Wales.  Going east via the Sheffield and Lincolnshire Junction we head via Worksop and Retford and then the original mainline heads northeast to Grimsby, throwing off a branch to Lincoln via Market Rasen that we see coming back south on the east of the map.  Quite aside from that, Beighton was also the launch point of the GCR's London extension- in fact, no.  Annesley (where the GCR/ GNR meet) was the start point of the extension, in the middle 1890s.  The Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire built to Annesley in the early 1890s to form their 'Derbyshire Lines'- do you see them?  A line of blue running from Beighton to that point where the red joins it, and off of it a loop through Chesterfield.   

I did say it was a bit of a confused tangle.  Now you're really going to hate me....

Let's just return to Midland lines at Nottingham for a moment.  Coming in from the south and the west we have lines from Derby and London, and going out to the north and east we have lines to Lincoln, Mansfield and (just off the map) Little Bytham.  The line to Chesterfield diverges before we get into Nottingham from the west.  The thing is, it's a mainline station where the mainline just sort of... ends. It becomes just a mess of branches. 

This is where a modeller in the 1930s came to thinking, 'what if'.  His idea was to run a Midland trunk route north out of Nottingham, via a few towns that in our timeline had been abandoned in the 12th Century, to conclude at an imaginery port where the Trent and the Humber meet.  He christened it 'the Sherwood Section' as it ran through the forest of that name, and it grew into a coarse scale O gauge layout that lived in a large shed and serious of outbuildings and gained something of a following because although the actual modelling was coarse, it was operated exactly like a real railway.  The owner was employed as a timetabler on the London Underground, you see...

But then having read about the Sherwood Section got me thinking.  Here we have a mainline railway running right across the eastern half of the MSLR's Manchester- Grimsby mainline.  On it's own that's nothing much, but it is also serving a few towns.... so how would the MSLR have reacted?



Do you want me to talk you though this?- or do you want to play spot the difference?  It's Christmas (ish)....

My idea.  Rather than building just the Sheffield- Grimsby route, the Sheffield & Lincolnshire Junction built more of a Y-shaped system.  A junction at Beighton with the Midland Railway, as happened in our timeline, but that short branch actually extends further on.... from Beighton the Sheffield District Railway is built as-per our timeline, except for being some 50 years earlier and linking to the MSLR's station rather than the Midland.  That comes down to Shirebrook.  From Shirebrook the route largely follows that of the Midland's line through Mansfield, except this time the Midland doesn't get there- the Midland route opened 1848 and the MSLR opened throughout in 1846/47, so the Midland has to be content with an end-on junction with the MSLR and running powers to Mansfield.  A neat inversion of OTL railway history, where the Midland had Mansfield and the GC had to be content with running powers.  From Mansfield the route heads east, through Sherwood Forest and terminating at one of the revived ghost towns- Rufford.

That describes the line as built in the 1840s.  In the 1890s the LDEC is built (except obviously for the branch to Sheffield) and when in 1906 the LDEC is taken over a junction is laid in.  We're getting ahead of ourselves a little here though because there is the small matter of the London Extension, opened in 1899... the Mansfield Railway gets built as a proper GCR line about 20 years earlier than OTL. 



Yes.....

So what does this little piece of fiction achieve?  Well...

It's not on the mainline as such but lets just consider.  It has a direct connection to the London Extension.  Historically Mansfield had a direct service to Marylebone, one train each way a day, from 1919.  Extend that to Rufford and that basically becomes the sum total of the express services.  Then factor in short distance services, probably three or four trains to Manchester via Sheffield.  A similar number to Chesterfield via the LDEC, and to Lincoln via the LDEC.  There's already services to Grimsby and Immingham via Sheffield, so probably not a direct service to those places, but historically the Grimsby fish trains took the LDEC/ Mansfield Railway as a shortcut to reach the GCML.  So a late night one-way service of a couple of fish vans.  A frequent suburban service to Nottingham and to Sheffield.... it's mounting up....

Then there's freight to consider....

You can see how it's not a trunk route but should still see fairly heavy traffic....

How much of it to model?  Depends on available space really, Rufford terminus is a must-have and I'm already working on what I see as being the first station out from it.  I'm not really keen on the 'huge room full of track' approach and- I'm mindful that something similar (a GCR secondary mainline, though set pre-WWI and in the home counties) has been done before and I'm not much wanting to do a copy of that either.   

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The Bullet
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****
Germany Germany



« Reply #2293 on: December 30, 2018, 07:30:14 pm »

Standing at the lathe, making small things.
Brake valves and hoses for the Taigatrommel this time.
four per cab.
Two for the brake line (HLL) and two for the air reservoir line (HBL).
Fiddly stuff, even in 5" gauge.
Next will be the rods for the brake cylinders and the brake lines.
Then on to the cab interior (just a rough impression)
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James Harrison
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Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #2294 on: December 31, 2018, 07:11:58 pm »

All four wagons done.  You can't buy Metropolitan Railway goods stock transfers, so my less-than-rubbish signwriting skills came into play.  Once it had dried I was able to weather it so the lettering isn't quite as obvious as it would otherwise have been.  I've ordered some LMS (pregrouping companies) transfers which will give me some not only for the Midland Railway van I've built, but also transfers for Lancashire & Yorkshire and North Staffordshire stock- both of which you might reasonably expect to see on the GC. 

Right, I think I'm about free to pick up the next project....
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The Bullet
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****
Germany Germany



« Reply #2295 on: December 31, 2018, 10:00:40 pm »

Right, I think I'm about free to pick up the next project....

...painting a Super Claud?

;-)
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James Harrison
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« Reply #2296 on: December 31, 2018, 10:15:53 pm »

 Cheesy  I wonder how many tins of Humbrol I'd need for that...
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James Harrison
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Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #2297 on: December 31, 2018, 10:18:19 pm »

Right, the very very last job done in 2018 has been to sort out the last of the ballasting.  Tomorrow (next year!) I think the stockpile of newspaper and cardboard will take a bit of a whallop as I'll make a start fleshing out the cutting sides.  Now I'm rather looking forward to this. 
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Mercury Wells
Rogue Ætherlord
*
I insiste that you do call me WELLS. :)


« Reply #2298 on: January 01, 2019, 03:17:01 am »

Right, the very very last job done in 2018 has been to sort out the last of the ballasting.  Tomorrow (next year!) I think the stockpile of newspaper and cardboard will take a bit of a whallop as I'll make a start fleshing out the cutting sides.  Now I'm rather looking forward to this. 

Not using chicken wire?
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James Harrison
Immortal
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Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #2299 on: January 01, 2019, 11:50:26 am »

Right, the very very last job done in 2018 has been to sort out the last of the ballasting.  Tomorrow (next year!) I think the stockpile of newspaper and cardboard will take a bit of a whallop as I'll make a start fleshing out the cutting sides.  Now I'm rather looking forward to this. 

Not using chicken wire?

I could, but if I use chickenwire I would then need to use plaster on top of it, not really a problem except for the weight of it.  I'm trying to keep the weight down, so far as possible, because for the foreseeable future this board needs to be mobile. 
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