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Author Topic: James' non-SP model building thread  (Read 138498 times)
The Bullet
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« Reply #2000 on: April 19, 2018, 09:29:26 pm »

Claud seems to have a loose slide valve.
Boiler off job.
not now.

Minx has received new blowdoen valves.

Swallow has new blowdown, re fitted firehole door.
Tried soldering the leaking pipe joint.
Took ages to warm up, solder would not flow properly.
Tried my "magix fluid" to see if there were any leaks, yes, there were.
Tried several times without success.
Then I tried solder without flux and it went.
No leak to be seen even under light pressure.

Let´s give her a test under steam this weekend.
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James Harrison
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Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #2001 on: April 20, 2018, 09:07:28 pm »

Hope you have some good weather for the steam test! 

Work on my building tonight?  Well, I've fitted the matchstick parts of the last 11 window cills.  Just the last 11 paper overlays to make, then I can look at the window and door lintels...
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James Harrison
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« Reply #2002 on: April 21, 2018, 12:44:04 pm »

Well, just sitting around thinking about how awful and frustrating a job it is to make window cills doesn't get the job done any quicker so I decided to grit my teeth and get on with it. 

So I managed to get all but four of the window cill overlays fitted.  You can't do them all in one go because with now having two ranges built up (three walls in each), you o the first and second walls and then come to do the third and find you need to support the model by gripping the first wall and then you tear out half of the newly-applied cills and have to start the job over again.  So you do two walls... and leave it and go to do something else.... and come back and do the last wall the following day when it has all dried out. 

Anyway, we seem to be getting somewhere with it. 



So here we have the first block (two storey range, two gable walls and a long wall) butted up to the second range (single storey, two long walls and a gable) with the odd final wall between the two just slipped into place.  I've had to cut the fixing lugs off of this wall because some idiot (that would be, err, me) forgot that the long walls sit inside the gables. 

As I say, just the last four cills left to do now so I can think about moving on to the lintels. 

The lintels are a little easier, the first thing you do is take a slip of paper and some graphite and produce a rubbing of the existing lintel. 



Then you cut this out and saturate it with dilute PVA glue to make it more pliable, and then you lay it over the building.  Now comes the difficult bit!- if you leave the middle of the paper slip in place you can fold it back into the window opening to suggest the lintel actually goes through the full wall thickness.  But if you bend it back it tries to distort the lintel face.  This is when having soaked it in PVA becomes useful.  You can take the back of a pair tweezers to hold the lintel flat to the wall whilst coercing a curved fold into it with a paintbrush full of dilute PVA.  Result?



Well, I think it looks ok, let's just do another couple to be able to make an informed judgement on it.



Yes... once painted up like stone I think this will be quite acceptable.
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James Harrison
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« Reply #2003 on: April 22, 2018, 05:53:24 pm »

Well we finished making the cills and lintels and painted them up. 





Hmm, yes.  Perhaps not quite the colour I had in mind.  Oh, it's cream certainly, but I was intending for something more toward the pale grey end of the spectrum. I'll see how it dries out and give it a wash of weathering and then make a judgement on it. 

Anyway, next step will be to paint the internal faces of the walls and then look at reinstating the glazing. 
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The Bullet
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« Reply #2004 on: April 22, 2018, 07:06:18 pm »

Tested Swallow today.

Re-soldered pipe: no leaks.

Crosshead pump: works. tiny leak to be dealt with.

Blowdown valve: works. Needs a bit of teflon tape to seal the thread so we lost a bit of water there.

Happy with the results.
Maybe I´ll run it next week.
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James Harrison
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« Reply #2005 on: April 26, 2018, 07:59:01 pm »

Success then!  Very satisfying I know to get something working again. 

I've started work on the interior of the goods offices.  Firstly the ground floor was fitted. 



That done, I temporarily glued the two roofs together which allowed me to mark up where the two join- and cut again some of the excess (which will allow me to build the upstairs corridor). 



At this point I discovered that despite measuring thrice before building it, the staircase was too high.  So the top four steps were removed. 



Attention then turned to the windows.  This I think is a part of the build I'm not looking forward to.  Building window frames is a job that I can instinctively tell is going to be frustrating, repetitive and taxing.  Lots of tiny little bits of plastic which have to be fettled to fit exactly into the window openings.  Well, so far I have marked up the glass and painted a lot of 0.5mm plastic strip ready to build the frames....   
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Miranda.T
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« Reply #2006 on: April 26, 2018, 10:39:06 pm »

Success then!  Very satisfying I know to get something working again. 

I've started work on the interior of the goods offices.  Firstly the ground floor was fitted. 



That done, I temporarily glued the two roofs together which allowed me to mark up where the two join- and cut again some of the excess (which will allow me to build the upstairs corridor). 



At this point I discovered that despite measuring thrice before building it, the staircase was too high.  So the top four steps were removed. 



Attention then turned to the windows.  This I think is a part of the build I'm not looking forward to.  Building window frames is a job that I can instinctively tell is going to be frustrating, repetitive and taxing.  Lots of tiny little bits of plastic which have to be fettled to fit exactly into the window openings.  Well, so far I have marked up the glass and painted a lot of 0.5mm plastic strip ready to build the frames....   


Such detail going into this! It is going to be rather special once completed.

Yours,
Miranda.
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The Bullet
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« Reply #2007 on: April 27, 2018, 07:04:10 am »

Received bogie frames for the big riding truck.
Need to turn the bits of steel into a working replacement bogie by sunday evening.

Neighbours daughter likes to ride trains. As she is wheelchair-bound she cannot sit on her own and someone has to sit behind her and hold her.
The big truck is the only one suitable for that purpose.
A few months ago it suffered a fractured bogie frame.
Silly cast alloy something stuff that cannot be welded.

So I´d better get to work.
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Antipodean
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New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #2008 on: April 27, 2018, 07:27:44 am »

Installing detail that very few will ever see. Only you know it is there.
Really enjoying these threads,  hobbyists after my own heart.
I have nothing to show alas - Mine are still in the planning stage for when I retire in a few years time.
       •   Putting multiple floors and wall partitions in tall buildings and installing lighting in each room that can be switched independently.
       •   Flickering LEDs to mimic
               o   Fire in the fireplace.
               o   TV program on TV
               o   Engineer welding metal
I have a box stashed away of models I have collected over the years. I intentionally did not start the models because I was never sure if I would have the finance in retirement that would enable me to play.
I have been working on them mentally, I know exactly what I want to do to them.

Keep on the good work!
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James Harrison
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« Reply #2009 on: April 27, 2018, 06:01:46 pm »

Success then!  Very satisfying I know to get something working again. 

I've started work on the interior of the goods offices.  Firstly the ground floor was fitted. 



That done, I temporarily glued the two roofs together which allowed me to mark up where the two join- and cut again some of the excess (which will allow me to build the upstairs corridor). 



At this point I discovered that despite measuring thrice before building it, the staircase was too high.  So the top four steps were removed. 



Attention then turned to the windows.  This I think is a part of the build I'm not looking forward to.  Building window frames is a job that I can instinctively tell is going to be frustrating, repetitive and taxing.  Lots of tiny little bits of plastic which have to be fettled to fit exactly into the window openings.  Well, so far I have marked up the glass and painted a lot of 0.5mm plastic strip ready to build the frames....   


Such detail going into this! It is going to be rather special once completed.

Yours,
Miranda.


I hope so!  I'm rather viewing it as a proving piece (rather like that 8" square diorama I finished earlier this month) to see what is and isn't going to practical and possible.  I guess really the ultimate test is going to be a full scratchbuilt building; in the seemingly distant future I see this building as part of a complex with a weighbridge, stables, railway goods shed and a goods warehouse and possibly a couple of other small sheds and bothies.  (I do have photographs somewhere of a Great Central Railway stableblock, but that is a project for the future).

Received bogie frames for the big riding truck.
Need to turn the bits of steel into a working replacement bogie by sunday evening.

Neighbours daughter likes to ride trains. As she is wheelchair-bound she cannot sit on her own and someone has to sit behind her and hold her.
The big truck is the only one suitable for that purpose.
A few months ago it suffered a fractured bogie frame.
Silly cast alloy something stuff that cannot be welded.

So I´d better get to work.

Good luck!  That's a really worthwhile project. 

Installing detail that very few will ever see. Only you know it is there.
Really enjoying these threads,  hobbyists after my own heart.
I have nothing to show alas - Mine are still in the planning stage for when I retire in a few years time.
       •   Putting multiple floors and wall partitions in tall buildings and installing lighting in each room that can be switched independently.
       •   Flickering LEDs to mimic
               o   Fire in the fireplace.
               o   TV program on TV
               o   Engineer welding metal
I have a box stashed away of models I have collected over the years. I intentionally did not start the models because I was never sure if I would have the finance in retirement that would enable me to play.
I have been working on them mentally, I know exactly what I want to do to them.

Keep on the good work!


Thank you!  That's rather like my predicament.... I can't build everything I want at the moment, because I just don't have the room.  So I spent several years building them mentally instead.  (It's so much easier to build something in your head than physically!)  I think of the reasons why I started to build the smaller bits of what I eventually want, possibly the most compelling was because I wanted to see if my imagination and expectations exceed my capabilities.  Happily I haven't, yet, been disappointed. 
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The Bullet
Snr. Officer
****
Germany Germany



« Reply #2010 on: April 27, 2018, 07:49:25 pm »


               o   Engineer welding metal


Easy to use. one bistable multivib at 5 Hz alternating a white and a blue LED, another at 0,2 Hz that switches the first one on and off every 5 Seconds.
I put mine into the =-gauge tinplate locoshed. Looks grest.

Bogie frames:

outline cut, holes drilled, waiting for the paint to dry.
Then trial assembly and drilling holes for the "useless" parts (dummy leaf springs, dummy axle boxes,....)
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James Harrison
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Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #2011 on: April 28, 2018, 02:14:39 pm »

Last night I attempted the windows. 

The blood, the gore, the screams, the flames.... they will all live long in my nightmares.  That's all I wish to say on the matter. 

So, erm, Plan B this afternoon I guess. 
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James Harrison
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« Reply #2012 on: April 28, 2018, 05:44:20 pm »

Plan B then, which really should have been Plan A all along, is to cut the window frames on my silhouette cutter.  Maybe half an hour of drawing and then listening to whirring noises as it works away and- 24 windows ready!  Right, now just to cut them out, build and fettle them, fit and paint them....



Drawn up and cut.  Then just quickly rubbed over with a graphite stick so the lines stand out. 



Components for one window, cut out the sheet....



... and glued together. 



The new window, test-fitted so I can fettle with it and the window opening.  Each opening is slightly different since I fitted the internal face of the walls so each one needs filing back, slightly differently. 



Fitted and painted, onto the next one.  This is going to be quite a lengthy drawn-out process. 
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The Bullet
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Germany Germany



« Reply #2013 on: April 28, 2018, 10:24:28 pm »

Big truck back on its own wheels.
New bogie looks good.

Charged batteries of most electric locos, repaired remote control of the RC railcar (switch was corroded)

As some time was left I fitted the couplings to the Loriot and made the first two sets of side rails.

3 more to go.
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James Harrison
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« Reply #2014 on: April 29, 2018, 02:07:43 pm »

12 windows assembled.  12 windows fettled and fitted.  12 windows painted.  10 windows still to go.  One circular window still to go.  Three doors still to go.  Plus the arched bit at the top of each window and door. 

Oh, and when I say painted, what I actually mean is they're been given a coat of green paint.  The glazing bars are a different colour and need picking out; you can see this on a photo I took at Rothley last year...



So, lots still to do just on the windows!  I think it will be worth it though.  I hope it will. 
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The Bullet
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Germany Germany



« Reply #2015 on: April 29, 2018, 03:43:11 pm »

Loriot in one piece (minus dummy leaf springs and other details.
Test run tomorrow.
As I haven´t found any suitable traction engine yet I used a small covered wagon as a load.
In Germany some wooden blocks were nailed (!) to the wagon floor to take the wheels of the load.
sometimes it looked like the information came at the last second  (I have some pics).

Photos will be taken tomorrow.

Loriot will have to come apart again for painting.
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James Harrison
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« Reply #2016 on: April 30, 2018, 05:51:42 pm »

Hoping the test run went well!  I've got, in a book about LNER wagons (well, Great Northern, Great Central and Great Eastern wagons technically), a number of photos and drawings of low and well wagons like that.  I can well believe how dodgy some of the loading solutions look... not quite the image I had in mind but hey!  look what I found!...



"Yo, Dawg, I heard you like trains.  So we put a train on your train...

Ahem.  Yes.  Quite.  I mean, look how it's jacked up on chocks.  (Round where I live that's usually a hint somebody's stolen your wheels). 
« Last Edit: April 30, 2018, 05:53:35 pm by James Harrison » Logged
The Bullet
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« Reply #2017 on: May 01, 2018, 12:34:42 pm »

I would like to have that loco....

Yesterday was great.
Minx ran well for the whole day.
The sound never ceases to amaze me.
Going down the "long" straight with the regulator just lightly open to keep the draught, entering the uphill curve, opening up slowly.
THUNDER!
2.5 bars of steamchest pressure is all she will take before starting to slip. Not easy to keep her in check with 8 bars on the boiler.
the tender needs some investigation as the injector feed water contains bubbles. Injector went anyway but was a bit stubborn to start.

Loriot bolted together for a test run. As I have no suitable traction engine or anything else, a "preserved" unbraked wagon had to do:



Well inside the profile, I guess. Now for the dummy leaf springs, other details and the paintjob....

Big riding truck went well. New bogie is just as it should be. Gave many rides and got a huge smile. Worth the effort.

Electric railcar, manual railcar, RC Railcar, blue shunter and 216 were also outside. At times we had 5 trains running on the loop (which is only 57 metres).

216 needs a minor repair. One bogie suddenly did not deliver any power.
The cause was a broken cotter pin keeping the main cog on the shaft.
It broke during the single derailment of the day.
Better a broken cotter pin than a cracked cog or a bent shaft.
This will take half an hour to fix.
Unplug two connectors, remove one cotter pin, remove one nut, withdraw the whole bogie downwards and the pin can easily be replaced.
This was one of the design constraints to have easy access to the drivetrain for maintenance.
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James Harrison
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« Reply #2018 on: May 03, 2018, 07:32:13 pm »



All 22 main windows built, fettled, fitted, painted.  This evening has seen the doorframes and doors fitted (thoughnot yet painted).  That leaves... just the one circular window to do.  I'm still not certain how I'm going to do that to be honest... drawing it up and cutting it out on the silhouette wouldn't be an issue, but then fettling it... Hmm. 
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James Harrison
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« Reply #2019 on: May 05, 2018, 03:15:07 pm »

All window frames and all doors done.  I'm calling Phase 2 finished.  Right; I want a change from buildings for a little while! 

As I'm typing this, the silhouette cutter is happily whirring away to itself at my side.  I'm cutting some sides for a one of these....



There are four of them still around, one of them is under restoration (and, not to blow my own trumpet, but erm, I do financially contribute to that restoration) and in about four months' time I'll have a chance to have a look at it again at the AGM of the 567 loco group. 
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James Harrison
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« Reply #2020 on: May 06, 2018, 04:50:22 pm »

Second build session on the first of the Barnum saloons.  I'm planning to build four; two each of the open saloons and the saloon brakes. 

And I ran into the first problem.  Drawings are done to full size of the model.  Import them into the silhouette cutter drafting software.  Set up the size of the plastic sheet I'll be feeding through the cutter.  And it then automatically rescales the drawing to suit the material. 

This has got to be one of those things that is useful but not useful.  I didn't notice yesterday and as a consequence the carriage sides cut to about 95% the size they needed to be.  Lots of fettling around today then re-scaling the drawing, and then cutting the sides.  Again. 

On the plus side this afternoon I did at least cut the second bogie (I only cut one yesterday and didn't notice) and the cariage floor.  This leaves the ends, the vestibules, the seats and the roof formers still to cut.  I'm hoping I can improve on my 50% fail rate when cutting; granted plastic sheet isn't all that expensive but it does have a cost- and also the more cutting you do, the more you wear the blade and the blade is quite an expensive piece of kit.  So you don't want to have to do more cutting than absolutely necessary.   
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RJBowman
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« Reply #2021 on: May 06, 2018, 08:15:51 pm »

And I ran into the first problem.  Drawings are done to full size of the model.  Import them into the silhouette cutter drafting software.  Set up the size of the plastic sheet I'll be feeding through the cutter.  And it then automatically rescales the drawing to suit the material...

...I didn't notice yesterday and as a consequence the carriage sides cut to about 95% the size they needed to be.  Lots of fettling around today then re-scaling the drawing, and then cutting the sides.  Again.

A detestable software feature, probably intended to make things easier for casual novice users. Automatic resizing should never be a default setting.
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James Harrison
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« Reply #2022 on: May 06, 2018, 08:37:46 pm »

It is something I know to look out for in future, but frustratingly it has cost me now two bogies and two carriage sides.  The bogies are no great loss, except in time- to cut each one took an hour- but the carriage sides have set me right back to the beginning.  It's all part of the learning curve though and I wuld point out that when I've drawn my own parts previously it hasn't been an issue- because I set up the size of the material before starting the drawing- but obviously various machines are different and in this case the original drawings were set up for a different size of material in a different cutter.

As for the bogies?  Before I realised they were too small I actually managed to build one; I'm not convinced they would work as every layer added on seemed to be adding extra torsion and tensions into the finished piece and the axles would have been hauled this, that and every other way.  In my spares box I've got some Bachmann Thompson bogies which I've decided to use instead- file off the surface finishes and alter them to look the part- and for the planned three more carriages I've ordered some Hornby bogies (which are much cheaper!) and I'll be repeating that process. 

Not quite as-per prototype but at the end of the day I'm building these to run on a layout and given a choice between prototype bogies that look good but fall apart in service and ready-to-run bogies that aren't quite right but work?- I know which I choose. 
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James Harrison
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« Reply #2023 on: May 07, 2018, 12:32:11 pm »







A tolerably nice day gave the opportunity for some tolerably good photos of the goods offices after I spent what felt like a lifetime replacing the doors and windows. 

I'll be continuing with this... soon... when I've done a couple of other things and built up a reserve of enthusiasm for it again. 
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The Bullet
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Germany Germany



« Reply #2024 on: May 08, 2018, 06:57:12 am »

Not quite as-per prototype but at the end of the day I'm building these to run on a layout and given a choice between prototype bogies that look good but fall apart in service and ready-to-run bogies that aren't quite right but work?- I know which I choose. 

Buy the RTR ones, sand off the sides and stick the fallapart-bits to them so they look "quite" right.

For the small bogies, could you put them on a flat wagon or near the shed as spares without giving away their wrong size?

216 drivetrain repaired. Only needs a new cotter pin to be inserted. The one from the spares box won´t last long.
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