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Author Topic: James' non-SP model building thread  (Read 145448 times)
Madasasteamfish
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09madasafish
« Reply #1950 on: March 26, 2018, 07:39:45 am »

Well, I don't think so. But my intention is for it to be viewed from a lower angle where the exposed wood isn't visible. Hopefully I should be able to get some more pictures tonight to show that effect.
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The Bullet
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« Reply #1951 on: March 26, 2018, 09:03:10 am »

Some pics of the "mystery" loco:

rotor with the cog securely fixed,  seems to be re-wound:




Field coil:


Frames (note big brass screws)


Frame top. 3 holes take the screws of the body. 4 additional holes....maybe this motor was originally fitted somewhere else.


All signs have been scratched off.




Closest match of the known world is a Märklin 12910 with hand-operated reverser.

Runs well now. Pulls enough for its size.
Fixing the cog took 5 minutes. Taking it apart in order to get the rotor out took about half an hour.
Putting back together with no parts left took even longer.
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« Reply #1952 on: March 26, 2018, 11:49:57 pm »

There was a time when toy makers made their own electric motors. Now they order a case of little tin can motors from a motor factory. No style.
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The Bullet
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« Reply #1953 on: March 27, 2018, 07:11:49 am »

I once had to re-wind a motor of an old Distler loco.
3 coils, 7 metres of wire each.
The commutator was a disc and very close to the coils so I had to pull the whole length of wire through the gap on each turn.
Took ages but was worth it.
The only real pain in the **** was the stupid cat chasing and attacking the wire while I was winding.
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James Harrison
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« Reply #1954 on: March 27, 2018, 07:24:28 pm »

Last night was spent modelling the cream brickwork. 



And, I'm afraid, that that is where I shall have to leave this one for the moment.  Some embossed plastic sheet arrived today, so that needs painting up...
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Persons intending to travel by open carriage should select a seat with their backs to the engine, by which means they will avoid the ashes emitted therefrom, that in travelling generally, but particularly through the tunnels, prove a great annoyance; the carriage farthest from the engine will in consequence be found the most desirable.
James Harrison
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« Reply #1955 on: March 30, 2018, 04:23:14 pm »

As it turns out, painting embossed plastic sheet is quite possibly one of the more protracted and boring jobs.  You put some paint down... and then you have to wait for it to dry.  Then you put some more paint down of a slightly different colour to suggest the multi-tonal effect... and then you have to wait for it to dry.  Then the mortar colour goes on... and comes off again.... and you have to wait for it to dry. 

Perhaps compounded in my case by painting it all up for red brick and then finding it should be blue engineering brick....

And then when I started actually using the embossed sheet I found I hadn't painted quite enough, so I've had to go back and do some more....

Anyway.... I think it might be worthwhile. 



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James Harrison
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« Reply #1956 on: March 31, 2018, 03:39:51 pm »

Well I painted some more brick sheet and then I was able to get a little further along. 



Now, this is the carriage loading dock bay.  I've put the brick walls around this and, ultimately, I'll be building a buffer stop in here which will be invisible!- there will be a timber baulk road over it so that carriages can be rolled right onto the flat wagons.  Why do it then?  Because I can and because I want to....



You might be wondering why I'm posting this photo, it looks no different really to what I shewed yesterday.  Look again.  I've added a fascia around the edges to (hopefully) prevent the corners getting too bashed up.  Also, you might notice that the platform walls come up higher than the balsa wood base.  I've decided that to fill this I'm going to use plaster filler, and to do that means I need to build some shuttering.  This fascia also forms that shuttering.   
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James Harrison
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« Reply #1957 on: April 01, 2018, 09:54:38 am »

Last night I added the plaster.  It went better than anticipated (by which I mean, we didn't have the 2018 Great Plaster Spill of Hednesford that I was half expecting), and when I came down this morning to inspect the work I found (again going against what I had been expecting) the pour was still in one piece and hadn't cracked or crumbled.  So far, so good! 

Some experience gained: 1. Plaster can simultaneously go further and yet less than you were expecting.  I made up a small bowl of the stuff; 5 eggcups of plaster to 2 of water- which was just about enough to do the area I wanted.  It used up about 1/3 of the box.... so if I'm expecting to do more than a thin plaster skim on anything, I'll need to make more than I think necessary.  2. It is difficult to get a good even level finish to it.  So don't expect to be able to plaster over something and then use the plaster finish as the top coat.  It will need covering somehow. 

Right, plans for today.  1. Smooth down the plaster.  2.  Clean up the brickwork where plaster has got at it.  3.  (If I have time) Ballast.   
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Sir Henry
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« Reply #1958 on: April 01, 2018, 12:39:34 pm »

2. It is difficult to get a good even level finish to it. 
Jiggling. That's what's needed. After pouring the plaster, put it on the washing machine and set it to spin or on a large baking tray supported only at the corners and drum your fingers on it - anything to make it jiggle. That should settle and level it nicely.
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James Harrison
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« Reply #1959 on: April 01, 2018, 12:53:58 pm »

I think it would have been too thick to achieve that; I know that's how you level concrete but concrete is made up of much larger aggregate so has the air gaps and cavities for it all to fall to when vibrated.  Plaster/ filler is much finer and more like a paste.   
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James Harrison
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« Reply #1960 on: April 01, 2018, 05:56:55 pm »

Ballast happened!  Ballast!  Suddenly it starts to look like something other than a wreck hauled out of a skip. 



Ballast is grit supplied by Woodcraft Scenics (a little bag of the stuff I bought about 20 years ago.... no idea if they're still going but other suppliers are available), laid dry, shunted around with a brush (then a wagon rolled over the rails to clear it from the flangeways) and then a roughly 50/50 mix of water and PVA glue was applied using an eyedropper.  We shall see how that goes. 
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Sir Henry
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« Reply #1961 on: April 01, 2018, 06:54:57 pm »

I think it would have been too thick to achieve that; I know that's how you level concrete but concrete is made up of much larger aggregate so has the air gaps and cavities for it all to fall to when vibrated.  Plaster/ filler is much finer and more like a paste.   
The process doesn't require air gaps or cavities as it acts like a non-Newtonian liquid. If you get the vibration just right, plaster that has any moisture in it will act like a liquid and while it's still actively wet, the rate of vibration doesn't need to be that close - the wetter it is the greater the leeway. Though with balsa sides and base you don't want it too wet, obviously.

On the other hand there is always fine sandpaper.

Keep up the fantastic work and showing it to us here - it makes amateurs like me up our game.
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James Harrison
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« Reply #1962 on: April 01, 2018, 07:02:20 pm »

Ultimately sandpaper is what I went for.  Curious stuff this filler.  It's dry, it's firm, but the moment I apply sandpaper and it takes the surface off it feels a little damp and sticky below.  Evidently it's still setting below the surface; it could be interesting to say the least when I come to put the final layer down (which would be coping stones and flags). 

Keep up the fantastic work and showing it to us here - it makes amateurs like me up our game.

I'm not that much more than an (over-enthusiastic) amateur myself, or at least that's how I view my abilities.  If you will believe me, this current project is the first layout of any type that I've turned my hand to. 
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James Harrison
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« Reply #1963 on: April 02, 2018, 01:00:47 pm »

I left off yesterday with the track ballasted.  This morning, I turned my attention to that one corner where I haven't done anything yet. 

I decided that I wanted a cinder path running along there, so I tore up some sandpaper and glued it down with PVA, then painted it with acrylic paint (a mixture of black, vermillion, burnt umber and sienna to try to get that blackish/ brownish/ greyish sludgy sort of a colour).  The effect I'm trying to model is when cinders cake together in wet weather and then bake into a sort of crust.  It is still wet at the moment, so I'll take a view on how effective it is later.  I kind of suspect at the moment I'll need to give it another go over with sand and try to mix more of a grey colour. 

Then I turned my attentions to the ballast.  In my chosen era, ballast used in goods yards would have been, at best, dirty second-hand stuff pulled out of running lines during track renewals.  At worst it would have been cinders and ash... in any case the stuff I've put down looks too clean and new.  I still had plenty of my ash colour to hand, so I diluted it down and filled an eye drop with it.  Then I dropped that all over the track.  It gives the ballast a nice dirty look (well, if you can make a dirty appearance look nice) but should also I hope finally set the ballast in position.  The PVA glue has done a good job to tack it down but rub your hand over it and it comes away in clumps....



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The Bullet
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« Reply #1964 on: April 02, 2018, 01:08:42 pm »

Hi James,

looks good. I like the cinder path.
It is the small things that make a layout come to life.
A bit of grass, moss, etc.
An old plank or chock block dropped into the ballast years ago and forgotten, grown in, barely visible.
So many possibilities.
I spent much time today running 0-gauge trains.
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James Harrison
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« Reply #1965 on: April 02, 2018, 01:21:44 pm »

Thanks!  As is so often the case, the more that gets done the more little things you spot... then the balance comes into play between time spent building the model and time spent actually running trains and enjoying the thing.  Of course, some modellers (and I rather suspect this is the camp I fall into) get more enjoyment building them than running them later- if my interests in preserved lines are anything to go by, where I tend to take more interest in extension and restoration projects that are 'works in progress' than the bits that are already done. 

I'm rather enjoying building this, at the moment; although there's quite a lot of different bits to do on it, none of them really take so long as to get boring or repetitive, and it's also encouraging to see that I can build something that doesn't look a mess!  It's a shame I don't have any room for the complete layout I'm planning- yet. 

Have fun with the O gauge!
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The Bullet
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« Reply #1966 on: April 02, 2018, 07:21:33 pm »

Finally the Claud came into the workshop and got a first session:

I put her upright on the front buffers and started the *beeeep* task of taking the valve gear off.

Looking forward from underneath the foundation ring.
The four Eccentrics are visible.


Screwdriver pointing at the one that had shifted.


Grub screw is to blame.


Expansion link with one strap.
A small pin that connects the expansion link to the lifting link had come loose. This caused the lifting links to collide and the eccentric to shift.


While working underneath the loco I found the long lost ball that fell out months ago while cleaning the automatic drain cocks.
Nothing gets lost...


Will take some time to adjust the eccentric and re-assemble the whole lot.



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James Harrison
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« Reply #1967 on: April 03, 2018, 07:34:41 pm »

It's interesting seeing the under-gubbins of your Claud because the newbuild project I support is currently buying up bits for their valvegear and motion.  A few years time we could do a compare and contrast between the 5" version and the 4' 8.5" type?

Progress on the cakebox challenge this evening?  I tried my hand at a buffer stop.  The full-size version is one long length of rail bent up into a a '?' sort of a shape, only a lot more angular.   I tried to do this to a piece of rail and it didn't end well.  It buckled, it tore and it parted.  So I went hunting in the bits box for plan B: a Hornby buffer stop.  It's going to be buried under a timber ramp so you won't be able to see it much, if at all.  Bits box came up empty.... so on to plan C: buying a Peco buffer stop.  Well, at least it will still be built of rail. 
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The Bullet
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« Reply #1968 on: April 03, 2018, 09:06:58 pm »

Hi James,

bending rail is always difficult due to the profile.
either heat it and build this:


or leave cold, chop to bits and build this:


I like that one.
Just a few lengths of rail and two wagon buffers with open shafts.

Maybe that one works for you.

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James Harrison
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« Reply #1969 on: April 04, 2018, 06:22:22 pm »

The one I've been looking to build is this:



Which is one length of rail, bent up.  No wonder I couldn't do it!

So I have bought a Peco rail-built buffer stop kit, which (considering it will be hidden below that timber ramp) is close enough for me. 

The ones that will be more numerous on the layout are the standard rail/ iron-built buffer stops, which look like this:



Whilst the kit I have bought is this type: https://www.peco-uk.com/product.asp?strParents=3309,3322&CAT_ID=3323&P_ID=17244



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Madasasteamfish
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09madasafish
« Reply #1970 on: April 06, 2018, 06:56:22 pm »

Well, following on from Banfili's comments I thought I'd share the results of a bit of an impromptu photo shoot I did at my MRC meet last week.



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James Harrison
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« Reply #1971 on: April 06, 2018, 07:17:09 pm »

I do like that.  Somehow it's more difficult to spot where the model finishes. 

Last night, I built a buffer stop, from a kit of three pieces.  I had to make a few changes. 

1. The lamp on the beam had to be cut off. 
2. Because I'd already ballasted the track meant it wouldn't clip around the rails.  So the clips had to come off and then the buffer stop was glued to the rails. 

After a little while then, I had this:



And then I started looking at the timbering over it.  This consists of a 6" thick timber coping with 6" thick timber boards over them.  The timber boards are screwed onto lengths of old rail.  Well, I modeled this, using some old rail and some lengths of balsa wood.



And then temporarily placed in position:



This then needs some more boarding taking it up level with the buffer stop, and then past it and over (with folding metal tracks to get vehicles those last few feet between wagon and terra firma).  Then I'll be looking at the coping stones around the dock and the platform, and the paving.  I'm not sure if these should be setts, stone flags, brick or gravel.  The drawings call for 'paving' and suggest small setts... then another drawing shows tarmac....

Now about the cinder path.  It's actually dried out and looks halfway acceptable (a surprise!).  I still think a final going over with some loose sand would do wonders though.   
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The Bullet
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« Reply #1972 on: April 06, 2018, 10:08:57 pm »

So now you need a GWR Loriot (like the 5" one on my bench) and this:



Some people standing beside it, wrestling a huge tarp in the wind....
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James Harrison
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« Reply #1973 on: April 07, 2018, 10:17:57 am »

So now you need a GWR Loriot (like the 5" one on my bench) and this:



Some people standing beside it, wrestling a huge tarp in the wind....


A Loriot?  Wrong railway I'm afraid, I've got the Great Central's equivalent though!



And one of these, waiting for me to get around to doing something with it. 

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James Harrison
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« Reply #1974 on: April 07, 2018, 12:20:05 pm »



In the cold light of day... hey, that cinder path looks quite good!  I was concerned that the torn edges of the sandpaper would be too obvious but it looks as though having saturated it with diluted PVA glue it's sort of melded into a semi-homogenous mass, which is the look I was going for.  It's kept the sandy texture too, which is pleasing. 

And from the other side...



The timber boarding has been permanently fixed down now, after building the last plank (which is actuslly three short planks because they have to joggle around the uprights for the buffer stop).  The buffer stop too has had to have a plank fitted.  It still looks a little rough but the ramp isn't finished yet.  There are some steel plates that I've still got to fabricate which will go over the gaps in that last board. 

What I'm looking at at the moment though are the coping stones.  As you can see I've built the coping for the loading dock, built up from a lamination of 0.5mm plastic sheet.  I then coated that in model filler to remove the striations and once it had dried I used a saw blade to produce the joints between the individual stones.  It's quite an intensive and long-winded job, building these copings.  I've given them a coat of grey paint but I'm in two minds about this.  I can't decide if they might look better given a sandy sort of a finish... but then that would suggest they're made of sandstone which I would argue is far too fragile a material to use for a coping, which would more likely be limestone or granite or some other exceptionally hard-wearing material.  I'll take a view on it once I've wokred some black paint into the joints. 

I've still got a coping to build for the other platform (which will be an interesting job as it needs to have a rounded finish) and then a kerbstone to run down the middle, because.... well I misread the drawings so the loading dock was built too high, which means that the platform surface around it will be too high, which means I either have to introduce a change of level in the platform or have the coping to the other side too high....

As there needs to be fence running around the dock anyway my solution to the problem is to introduce a kerbstone and a step change (not really a good idea to have a sloping surface on a platform, especially if the slope runs toward the track...) and build the fence just inside the kerb.  It's an error of course and a good solution to a problem should never really have existed, but it introduces a bit more interest in what otherwise would be a bland flat paved area so I'm putting it down as a happy accident. 
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