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Author Topic: Steampunk Cocktails!  (Read 21246 times)
The Duchess of Frugonia
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« Reply #25 on: May 07, 2011, 11:11:35 am »

I believe the cocktail containing the Lillet may well be the Vesper, James Bond's first cocktail.

I have a fondness for alternating alcoholic with alcohol free cocktails, thus enabling me to control a bustle more easily!  From the AF cocktail list I enjoy a Manchester Mule, good Ginger Beer [Idris, preferably] with a splash of Rose's [no other will do] Lime Cordial, topped with a grating of lime zest if I'm feeling fancy.  This can be a winter drink, or, over ice, a refreshing summer long drink. 

Almost any straight vodka cocktail can be made AF, the vodka being substituted for by a variety of water/glucose/sugar syrup/chloroform mixes.  Though don't use the chloroform in a shaken drink - it explodes sometimes, unreliably - or with hot water for a toddy - violently explodes, reliably!  Yes, chloroform IS POISONOUS/TOXIC, do NOT take this suggestion seriously. I have used it and lived to tell the tale, but only taken twice....  On your own head be it - it is genuinely TOXIC.

*thinks, "should I REALLY post this?  Oh, what the blazes!*

There is no alternative to gin, preferably Gordon's, so I do not attempt AF cocktails based on gin substitutes.  In my world, they do not exist. 

A Dark & Stormy AF made with Molasses Sugar syrup blended with Rum flavouring, then Old Jamaica ginger beer, can be a successful mix, depending upon the mixologist's attention to detail in the manufacturing of the syrup.  Readymade AF "rum" syrups are available widely, but I prefer to manufacture my own.  Good AF cocktails require a degree of accuracy and scientific investigation suitable to the Steampunk tradition.

AF drinks are not for the lilylivered, they are for those who drive, those who wish a minimising of pain the following day, those with medical conditions [including those persons on antibiotics/painkillers etc] who cannot include alcohol in their diets and simply those who like them.  I so often find myself in the position of having to defend my choice of AF drinks that I have this explanation to hand for every barkeep I encounter!

Ginger, grapefruit, cranberry and pomegranate are good fruit bases for most fruity cocktails, IMHO. 

Fentiman's Rose Lemonade is a mixer made in heaven [well, Gateshead], as are the entire Fentiman's range.  A different range of mixers and cordials from Belvoir Fruit Farms comes highly recommended, as do many of the flavoured syrups from creamsupplies.co.uk.
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« Reply #26 on: May 07, 2011, 12:57:15 pm »

AF drinks are not for the lilylivered, they are for those who drive, those who wish a minimising of pain the following day, those with medical conditions [including those persons on antibiotics/painkillers etc] who cannot include alcohol in their diets and simply those who like them.  I so often find myself in the position of having to defend my choice of AF drinks that I have this explanation to hand for every barkeep I encounter!

Ginger, grapefruit, cranberry and pomegranate are good fruit bases for most fruity cocktails, IMHO. 

Fentiman's Rose Lemonade is a mixer made in heaven [well, Gateshead], as are the entire Fentiman's range.  A different range of mixers and cordials from Belvoir Fruit Farms comes highly recommended, as do many of the flavoured syrups from creamsupplies.co.uk.

thanks for the ideas.
I also rarely drink. I'm not a huge fan of the taste of alcohol and i am also a complete light weight!
I think we're going with the G+Tea (or Mar-tea-ni). It's got the whole sweet, sour and sharp thing going on.
We also should have some Fentimans in stock too, aswell as Ginger beer (we've gone for Jamaican) and orange and cranberry juices and teh usual fizzys.
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The Duchess of Frugonia
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« Reply #27 on: May 07, 2011, 02:13:56 pm »

Excellent news, many thanks.

*scuttles back to sewing room... muttering to self*
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Semonius
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Netherlands Netherlands



« Reply #28 on: September 11, 2011, 08:34:18 pm »

thought about the victorian age and realised that Dutch Genever is a big part of that age.

used in the original american cocktails at the time
and the english created their own version called Gin.

if you wanna get into the "spirit" of the age.. making a few cocktails with dutch genever is very steampunk!!

personally I prefer portugese porto.. but thought it would be cool to share.

although the next video is a commercial it shows the history of the original genever used throughout that time.

http://youtu.be/GmetqaGDz_E     some of the history on Bols Genever

http://youtu.be/8o67Zx_0vS4     the original collins cocktail with dutch gin as recorded in 1876.

http://youtu.be/ZPqLzHQ6TKI    the holland house hotel in new york classic cocktail with dutch gin.

for those not shy of a little spiritus in their lives. enjoy.

hoping to read more suggestions on fantastic beverages of the age.


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Mr. Boltneck
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« Reply #29 on: September 12, 2011, 12:34:52 am »

Gin actually hit England well before the 19th Century. I seem to remember reading about a serious economic crisis in the 18th Century that was started by too large a share of the British grain crop going into gin distilleries.
My parents were in the Netherlands a little while back and brought us a bottle of old-style Dutch Genever, which was quite tasty. And I say that as someone who can usually leave gin alone.
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Semonius
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« Reply #30 on: September 12, 2011, 10:44:40 pm »

be sure to use dutch genever in your cocktails.. Grin.it was more widely used than british gin. Wink wish I had seen this post earlier..I wouldn't have made my own post...  Huh anywaysz Look at all the fun cocktails...oooh Ima gonna try some of these! Tongue

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Prof. Postrophe
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« Reply #31 on: September 13, 2011, 07:23:04 am »

I am rather surprised that no-one has as yet mentioned that mid-ninteenth-century New Orleans invention; the Poussé-cafe: to which I offer you this reference...
http://www.badideatheater.com/pousse.html
« Last Edit: September 13, 2011, 07:30:49 am by Prof. Postrophe » Logged

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Darkhound
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« Reply #32 on: September 13, 2011, 10:32:37 pm »

Murder in the Mirror

In a Martini glass

1 ounce good white rum
3 ounces grenadine
1 maraschino cherry
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CaptainMurra
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why hello there!


« Reply #33 on: September 15, 2011, 05:46:34 am »

i found these ones!

The Hot Lolita
2 parts Orange Crush (or other colored fruity soda)

1part Vodka

 Hot–heat vodka, pourinto a class, add soda, serve with an orange slice
Cold–Pur vodka and soda in a glass, add dry ice for that steamy effect
 

What could be more genteel than a hot drink on a cool night?  This next one is perfect for regaling your friends with your latest exploits and adventures in front of a nice warm fire…

 
 

The Gentleman Airpriate
2 oz Vodka

 

1 oz Kahlua

Milk

Gently heat vodka and Kahlua.  Pour into a brandy snifter and add milk to taste (about 1/2 oz is usually good).  Garnish with a sprinkling of nutmeg or chili pepper depending on how adventurous you’re feeling.   

Of course, what ever your beverage may be, please enjoy your holiday responsibly.
Do you have a favorite holiday cocktail, Steampunk or otherwise? Tell us for a chance to win a sparkly tiara for all your holiday parties!
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Elizabeth Boswell
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« Reply #34 on: September 15, 2011, 03:55:17 pm »


The Goldschläger Champagne Cocktail


You will need:
Midori Melon Liqueur
Goldschläger
Champagne of your choice

It goes like this:
1 shot Midori [Melon]
1 shot Goldschläger
Champagne




It looks glorious, plus could anything be greater than green and gold in a champagne flute? no.
« Last Edit: September 15, 2011, 04:22:40 pm by Elizabeth Boswell » Logged

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Lord Jeffreys
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« Reply #35 on: September 15, 2011, 07:27:31 pm »

Can I share a cocktail recipe given me by Warren Ellis himself?

The Pint of Whiskey
1) Take one (1) pint glass
2) Fill with whiskey
3) Slap the (deleted) out of anyone who orders a [frou-frou] drink
Brilliant!
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CaptainMurra
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why hello there!


« Reply #36 on: November 05, 2011, 08:14:38 am »

oh i also noticed that
THE LEAGUE OF S.T.E.A.M have a cocktail section of their site.

http://leagueofsteam.com/2011/11/cocktail-of-the-week-01/
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groomporter
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« Reply #37 on: November 06, 2011, 06:06:59 pm »

The Sasha's Den of Iniquity podcast is an entertaining look at classic cocktails.
http://www.pixlee.net/?s=podcast
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walkthebassline
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« Reply #38 on: November 06, 2011, 10:45:58 pm »

My favorite cocktail is still the Manhattan; since it dates to at least the 1870s I'd say its plenty steampunk. Its a classic but I can never remember the exact recipe. My rough guide is two parts bourbon to one part vermouth and a dash of bitters. Shake it over ice and garnish it with a maraschino cherry. If you use quality bourbon serve it up; otherwise rocks is fine.

Another favorite, albeit a bit newer, is the Godfather, which is scotch and amaretto. A 50/50 mix is fine, although I sometimes cut back on the amaretto a bit; it can get a bit too sweet. That one does benefit from some ice; I usually use two or three big pieces.

Other than that I just take my whisk(e)y straight or with a little water.
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« Reply #39 on: March 04, 2012, 01:16:52 am »

There was another tea cocktail mentioned here by me a few weeks ago.

There is also a link to many tea based recipes.  Which I shall also post here.

http://www.drinksmixer.com/cat/19/

and most importantly the blatantly renamed by me

"Tea & G"

I have had this with freshly squeezed lime rather than lemon .....it was lovely.



    2 parts Gin
    2 parts brewed and chilled Earl Gray Tea
    Squeeze of lemon juice
    Spoonful of sugar
    lime wheels for garnish
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dreambig
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« Reply #40 on: April 10, 2014, 04:43:43 am »

This thread needs a bump.

Any one have any recipes for early cocktails?

Whiskey was the drink of choice in the American West during the 19th century. Beer was second.

Aparitifs were popular in Europe along with other drinks.

But any mixed drinks folks know of?
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Prof. Convict Archfiend
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« Reply #41 on: April 10, 2014, 05:21:01 am »

 Huh

The Screwdriver....!!
(Cant believe no one mention it yet!!)


Brandy Alexander(basic)

1 1/2 oz brandy
1 oz dark creme de cacao
1 oz half-and-half
1/4 tspgrated nutmeg
« Last Edit: April 10, 2014, 05:25:07 am by Prof. Convict Archfiend » Logged

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Keith_Beef
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« Reply #42 on: April 10, 2014, 09:03:08 am »

Two things come to mind as steamy cocktails for me.

Ginger Ale and Rum.
One of the first commercial ginger ales was Vernor's Original. Although regionally limited in distribution, it dated from just after the Civil War. The ginger, a much favored Victorian era spice (almost as much as lemon, a cocktail of which with gin, sugar and ice is also most refreshing), along with a hint of vanilla works well, especially with a strong spiced, molasses heavy rum like Kraken. I suggest a stoichiometric proportion of  2 parts ginger ale to 1 parts Kraken, shaken with ice and a lime slice garnish.

The Sazerac
A classic New Orleans cocktail dating from before the Civil War. Formulations vary, however the main ingredients generally include sugar or cane sugar simple syrup, Rye Whiskey, Absinthe (other, lesser spirits have been substituted over the decades when it was unavailable), Peychaud's Bitters, Angostura bitters (an optional variation that is not entirely classic but which seems to have become traditional) and a lemon peel twisted and dropped in the mix. I like a little dash of cognac in mine as well. Traditionally, one swished the Absinthe in a chilled glass then discarded it before adding the other ingredients. This is wasteful. Frugality demands that it be put to a far more noble use, such as remaining in place or being consumed as part of the Sazerac preparation ritual.

Here is a link discussing it and providing mixing options sufficiently detailed and erudite to satisfy the aesthetic complexity and mad scientist synthesist chemist cravings of any steampunk:
http://www.gumbopages.com/food/beverages/sazerac.html


I like Sazerac, and make it every now and again, with variations.

I don't usually have any absinth around, so I use some aniseed alcohol such as Pernod, Pastis 51 (or, though they are sweeter, Anis del Mono or Anisette at a push). It's easier to be less wasteful if I make three or four Sazeracs at a time: swirl the aniseed around a glass, pour it into the next glass, repeat. Then add the rye whiskey and the other ingredients.

But I tend not to follow recipes in anything; I'll read a few variations on a recipe and then make up my own version, which I'll change and adapt over time anyway, and rarely write down. Yesterday I made myself a little pre-prandial pick-me-up of approximately three parts Pomegranate juice, one part Saint-Yorre (effervescent mineral water) and one part boukha (fig alcohol). It's passover soon and since boukha is kosher for passover it was shouting at me from the shelves when I went in the supermarket last week.

Another favourite of mine is the Pisco Sour that I became slightly addicted to in Chile. The Wikipedia article claims that the Chilean version leaves out the egg white, but when I drank it in Antofagasta the north of the country it indeed used egg whites to make the froth. From memory, the rim of the glass is dipped in lime juice and then into fine granulated sugar, the juice is pressed from a lemon and put in a shaker with some ice cubes, the white of an egg and some Pisco, then shaken, then poured into the glass. This needs a biggish glass, so that there is room for the froth on top.


Somewhere, I have a little hardback book of cocktails, punches and flips, but it seems to be in a crate somewhere at the moment. Maybe in the airship hangar. From memory, there is a recipe for punch with the requisite five ingredients of tea, champaign, ice, brandy and something else (lemon juice?), that begins "take a block of ice of the size of a baby's head…".

But I did manage to lay hands on the Daily Express Enquire Within, published in 1934 but with a couple of interesting recipes.

Monkey's Gland
Fill the shaker half full of broken ice and add :
Two teaspoonfuls of absinthe ; two teaspoonfuls of grenadine ; a quarter of a gill of gin, a quarter of a gill of fresh orange juice.
Shake well and strain into a cocktail glass.

Prairie Oyster
Two teaspoonfuls of Worcester sauce ; two teaspoonfuls of brandy ; one teaspoonful of vinegar ; one teaspoonful of tomato ketchup.
Mix well, drop the yolk of a fresh egg into the glass, and add red pepper on top. Some people like a dash of Angostura bitters in it, other prefer it without the brandy, but they take a plain glass of sherry immediately afterwards.
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« Reply #43 on: April 10, 2014, 09:16:20 am »

This thread needs a bump.

Any one have any recipes for early cocktails?

Whiskey was the drink of choice in the American West during the 19th century. Beer was second.

Aparitifs were popular in Europe along with other drinks.

But any mixed drinks folks know of?


 try some of these   old fashioned  cocktails and mixes  as a reviver . It is an intriguing little blog

http://enginaire.blogspot.co.nz/2013/08/steampunk-cocktail-retrospective.html

  I have stolen these 2 whiskey  cocktails
 
Thunderclap Cocktail

Shake well in ice and strain.
1/3 Part Brandy
1/3 Part Gin
1/3 Part Whiskey

 Green Dragon Cocktail

Stir well with cracked ice, strain and serve with an Olive and a twist of Lemon Peel on top.
2/3 Whiskey
1/3 Italian vermouth
2  Dashes  Angostura Bitters   


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George Salt
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« Reply #44 on: April 10, 2014, 09:43:12 am »

Whiskey was the drink of choice in the American West during the 19th century. Beer was second.

I imagine beer was what was drunk if you were thirsty, whiskey when you needed a drink.
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