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Author Topic: Victorian names which ought to be revived.  (Read 61971 times)
Clockwerk Wolf
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« Reply #275 on: November 18, 2009, 10:57:27 am »

I've often joked that my full name will one day be amended to Judah Benjamin Tiberius Joseph Constantine Singer the Great. Once I become World Emperor anyway.  Grin

I think I will name one of my sons Viktor.
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darkshines
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« Reply #276 on: November 18, 2009, 11:03:05 am »

I adore the name Viktor, and I PROMISE I will name one of my future sons Viktor! I also adore Vincent.
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Ezra Hogbin
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« Reply #277 on: November 18, 2009, 12:30:11 pm »

Just seen this.
Both of our children got old fashioned names. Our daughter is called Emily and our son, Jacob.
However, it appears Emily came back into fashion as, unbeknown to us, it was the most popular name that year (1998) and we thought she'd be the only one in her class  Roll Eyes
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« Reply #278 on: November 18, 2009, 01:52:21 pm »

There was a story in British newspapers recently about a guy who assisted his wife's suicide and the report included quotes from their two grown up children...Caracticus and Boudica.
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« Reply #279 on: November 20, 2009, 11:32:01 pm »

Caracticus Potts!!
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« Reply #280 on: November 20, 2009, 11:43:19 pm »

Personally,I feel Lettuce would be a good Forename for someone whose Surname was Pray :-)
Funny, my mentor always called me "Lettuce Flea" when his town square demonstrations exploded.
It was always, "Come, Lettuce Flea! Back to the lab!"

'
ROFLMAO
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« Reply #281 on: November 26, 2009, 03:45:02 pm »

I've been looking at records for my Victorian ancestors and on my dad's side they didn't have a lot of imagination as from 1730 until 1910 (6 generations), they were all named from a selection of John, Donald, Alexander, Peter, William or Edward for the boys and Mary, Margaret, Jean, Elizabeth, Janet, Catherine and one Jessie for the girls. There were a few named Georgina and Williamina, using the Scottish convention of adding 'ina' to a male forename to make a female one. Once into the 20th century the families seemed to get bigger and more names were needed, so 'new' ones like Robert, Henry, David, James, Charles, Russell, Ruth and Annie appeared by the first world war. In 1921, the 'ina' tradition was still going strong with Robertina though she was usually known as 'Ruby'.

On my mum's side there was a greater variety of the popular names, adding to the above, Alice, Caroline, Emma, Alfred, Frederick, Sarah, Minnie and Ernest. They did however have a couple of interesting names more akin to this post ~ Elfreda Ethel, Isaac, Rhoda, Hannah and Hephzibar!

So it seems to me, ordinary Victorians were probably much like us with currently popular names. Most are still in circulation so don't need to be revived. Maybe we just prefer to talk about and remember the unusual?
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Atterton
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« Reply #282 on: June 05, 2011, 09:02:27 pm »

I guess this is the most appropiate thread for this I want to say that I have become an uncle, to a little baby girl. She is going to be named Caroline Elise. Elise is my grandmother´s name, but she was born in 1914, so I can´t say if it´s a name used much in the Victorian era. Still, it at least sounds old fashioned.
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Captain Lyerly
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« Reply #283 on: June 05, 2011, 09:13:21 pm »

That's wonderful!

D'Oh!  Thread necromancy!!!  That's okay... but really, you could have put a whole thread in for Caroline Elise.  We wouldn't mind.  Beethoven's famous sonata was written "For Elise", so the name had been around quite a while.  Pretty name, too. 

Oh, and Congratulations!!!


Cheers!

Chas.
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« Reply #284 on: June 05, 2011, 09:19:33 pm »

I guess this is the most appropiate thread for this I want to say that I have become an uncle, to a little baby girl. She is going to be named Caroline Elise. Elise is my grandmother´s name, but she was born in 1914, so I can´t say if it´s a name used much in the Victorian era. Still, it at least sounds old fashioned.

Congratulations on your unclehood, Atterton! 

As for the name "Elise"....  Census records reveal that, while the name "Elise" was in use during the Victorian era in the U.K., it wasn't as popular as the forms "Eliza" and "Elsie."

-- Nephele
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crookedfingers
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« Reply #285 on: June 05, 2011, 10:30:44 pm »

I use to know someone in school whos nickname was Lettuce. Her actual first name was Leticia. (Not sure if I have the spelling right) It is easy to see how nicknames could be mistakenly recorded as first names during a census, not everyone wrote their own details down, and just a missing out of quotation marks or even a single letter can change a name or make a nickname appear as a first name.

As for names, my brother and I have always been fond of Ancient Roman names, which could work in a victorian setting. My favourite is Tiberius, despite the tragic story behind it.
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« Reply #286 on: June 05, 2011, 10:44:15 pm »

A good friend of mine has the nickname 'Effie', her full name is Euphemia.  My sister's mother-in-law is called Griselda (sounds like one of the ugly sisters to me).

Another friend's mother decided to give her cat a name she thought was classically Victorian, so she called it Rubella.  It was soon renamed Ruby when she found out it wasn't Victorian, but German measles.
« Last Edit: June 05, 2011, 10:54:28 pm by Major Wolfram Quicksilver » Logged

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« Reply #287 on: June 05, 2011, 10:46:06 pm »

my family tree is littered with Alexanders and Jeans on one side and Nellies and Willies on the other (good, solid Scottish names)

my husband did some family tree work on his side and found slightly more interestingly: a Gentilda and an Ethelinda!

but the best name i have ever heard was when a friend told us that one of their old family names was Ezekiel and they were very tempted to attach that to an old family surname: Polecackett and label their oldest sone with it...

- what an awesome name - Ezekiel Polecackett!!!

the fact that their son is the tallest, and gangliest type imaginable fitted so well  Cheesy (think Ichabod Crane from the Legend of Sleepy Hollow cartoon hehe) but maybe not the easiest of names to live down at school!


and congratulations Atterton!
-Rhylla-
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Nephele
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« Reply #288 on: June 06, 2011, 12:11:29 am »

I use to know someone in school whos nickname was Lettuce. Her actual first name was Leticia. (Not sure if I have the spelling right)

"Lettice" (spelled with an "i" -- not a "u") is an actual name -- derived from Leticia/Laetitia -- and dates as far back as the 13th century in England.

-- Nephele





« Last Edit: June 06, 2011, 12:14:31 am by Nephele » Logged
Flightless Phoenix
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« Reply #289 on: June 06, 2011, 02:37:17 am »

There really were some wonderful names in victorian times.

Personally though I would advise against long forenames when naming your children, unless they can easily be shortened if your child wishes. I hated growing up as 'Josephine'- having a name which is taller than you is no fun. Hence, I became very firmly a 'Josie' and it's stuck, perhaps because with an adult height of 5'2" i'll never grow into my name!

However I think ununsual names are great as middle names. I know a family with 3 children, their middle names are Bathsheba, Balthazar and Boez (they also have a cat called Hepzibah). I think this is fantastic.

Someone also mentioned the name Serafina. I know a wonderful lady who is doubly priveledged, not only is she a Serafina, but when she met Phillip Pullman he told her 'I've been waiting my whole life to meet you' because of it (Serafina Pekkala is a character from the His Dark Materials Trilogy).
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« Reply #290 on: June 06, 2011, 03:23:57 am »

In my family we have first names Ballard, Forrest, Stuart (Confederate generals) for males; some females were Irene, Jerusha, Adele, and Gloria.

One of my favorites, however, was a g-g-g-g-g? Grandfather.  Named Agin Agi'li.  He has quite an impressive monument in the cemetery at Talequah, at the far end of the Trail of Tears.


Cheers!

Chas.
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Polaris
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« Reply #291 on: June 06, 2011, 01:53:09 pm »

My kids are all getting victorian names.... Honora, Cordelia, or Venetia for a girl or Felix, Benedict, or Calvin for a boy.

Jasper and Belladonna used to be on there before the Twilight saga came out... ¬__¬
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Emperor Bob
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« Reply #292 on: June 06, 2011, 07:22:35 pm »

I love the name "Alastair", but I would be afraid to force a son to go through school with the nickname "Alice," which I feel like someone would shorten it to almost immediately.

Also, I couldn't help but notice that boy's name #310 on the list for 1880 is "Pink"
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Atterton
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« Reply #293 on: June 06, 2011, 07:30:26 pm »

Actually I just remembered that my grandmother was called Elise, but her mother was called Caroline. I assume she grew up in Victorian times.
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crookedfingers
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« Reply #294 on: June 06, 2011, 08:06:43 pm »

I love the name "Alastair", but I would be afraid to force a son to go through school with the nickname "Alice," which I feel like someone would shorten it to almost immediately.

Also, I couldn't help but notice that boy's name #310 on the list for 1880 is "Pink"

Actually, I've met a couple of people with that name and they've always been called Al, or Ali. There is a chance of being called 'alice' in school, but it didn't happen to the people I've met. Possibly because it's not an unusual name around here. (not common, but not rare, either)
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Mercury Wells
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« Reply #295 on: June 06, 2011, 08:17:15 pm »

Rasputin, Vladamir have to be revived.
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crookedfingers
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« Reply #296 on: June 06, 2011, 08:33:00 pm »

Also, I couldn't help but notice that boy's name #310 on the list for 1880 is "Pink"

One of my ancesters was named Pink, and his sibling had an even more unfortunate name, but I can't remember what it was. I have no idea where the printout of the family tree went when we moved.
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Captain Lyerly
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« Reply #297 on: June 07, 2011, 02:51:06 am »

Rasputin, Vladamir have to be revived.

Rasputin was not a first name, sorry to state.  The Mad Monk's full name was Grigori Yefimovich Rasputin.

Vladimir might be misconstrued as stemming from the unseemly interest in all those sparkly emo vampires.




Z
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Mercury Wells
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« Reply #298 on: June 07, 2011, 02:59:28 am »

Oh well, I tried Smiley
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Guinevere Meander
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« Reply #299 on: June 08, 2011, 12:33:05 pm »

It is my (untutored) understanding that names like "Despair" and "Illness" (I cannot remember the Arabic translations) are much-used in some Arabic-speaking desert-regions of North Africa ( "The Maghreb", specifically), because many other common names, such as "Akhbar" ( "Great") are considered to be parental-hubris, and therefore unlucky/blasphemous.

I could easily see this practice spreading out in a more Steampunk Universe, with faster communication and cultural exposure.

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