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Author Topic: Victorian names which ought to be revived.  (Read 61768 times)
Mrs. Sullivan
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« Reply #175 on: May 13, 2008, 01:53:31 am »

but upon looking at that list for 1880, i saw names such as Julius, Rufus, Alonzo, Roscoe, and Silas.

Ah, but Roscoe is such a productive name, no?

My father always used to refer to his pistol as "Roscoe" - where does that come from, anyway?
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Sir Nathaniel Wolf
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« Reply #176 on: May 13, 2008, 02:12:29 am »

I myself have always been fond of Dorian as a young lad's name, after a certain ageless Mr. Gray of literature.

Though I confess some liking to Nathaniel, my middle-name, originally the given-name of my great-grandfather, and also the given-name of my alias here.  (Though it was an outright devil to remember how to spell it when I was first learning to write.  Rather embarassing, yes.)

As for female names... well, I can't explain why, but the name Kyra springs to mind.  I'm rather enamored also with Celtic names, as well, but that's likely because of my attractions toward ladies of Gaelic heritage - ah, a feminine voice with a healthy Scots brogue, sends my heart aflutter every time!
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« Reply #177 on: May 13, 2008, 02:30:17 am »

Surely no one would be referring to everyone's second favorite sheriff, "Rosco P. Coltrane?"
"Now wait just one cotton pickin' minute..."
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Ben Franklin's Electric Kite
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« Reply #178 on: May 13, 2008, 10:14:06 pm »

My father always used to refer to his pistol as "Roscoe" - where does that come from, anyway?

Surely no one would be referring to everyone's second favorite sheriff, "Rosco P. Coltrane?"
"Now wait just one cotton pickin' minute..."

Naw. Much older than The Dukes of Hazaard. Guys in Humphrey Bogart movies sometimes call their pistols 'roscoes.' Based on this dubious evidence, I presume it's real 1920's slang.
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« Reply #179 on: May 13, 2008, 10:19:46 pm »

The term "rosco" derives from a brand of gun. They were usually li'l .22 plinkers or derringers.
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Lady Penelope
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« Reply #180 on: May 13, 2008, 10:22:54 pm »

From Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary:

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/roscoe
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Aedon
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« Reply #181 on: May 14, 2008, 01:50:07 am »

Enlightening.
I shall never view a pistol quite the same again... and possibly name a future son Roscoe.

I am easily amused, aren't I?
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DrEllaNunn
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« Reply #182 on: May 17, 2008, 03:19:07 pm »

Nathaniel is an absolute favorite name of mine, although I tend to associate it with the 18th century colonies.  I dont know why.

My husband's g-g-grandfather's name was Zoraster and he had a g-g-grandmother whose name was Arimathea.  Definitely unusual names. 
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Lady Anne
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« Reply #183 on: May 18, 2008, 03:41:23 am »

Zoroaster!  Awesome.  They could call him Zorro for short.
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von Corax
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« Reply #184 on: May 21, 2008, 06:00:43 am »

My own quest for a Steampunk pseudonym led me to peruse my own family tree which, although it yielded little of use to my primary objective, did reveal several rather pleasing names:

  • Everard
  • Hamilton
  • Donovan
  • quite a few Sheridans (I am actually a nephew, several generations removed, of Richard Brinsley Sheridan)
  • a rather astonishing number of Alonzos

This last quite surprised me, as I don't normally consider Alonzo to be an Irish name. I suppose, though, that during the Peninsular Wars more than a few Irish soldiers came home with Spanish or Portugese brides...

(Incidental to the Sheridan connection: the mapspeck nearest my current residence is called Brinsley.)
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Lola Holmgang
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« Reply #185 on: May 21, 2008, 08:26:20 am »

I myself have always been fond of Dorian as a young lad's name, after a certain ageless Mr. Gray of literature.

Indeed. This is what I answered when my mother asked my opinion on names for my future progeny, in the unlikely event I would choose to have any. Dorian Oscar, what a distinguished name! Of course we mustn't forget Constance, but I couldn't bear it if any child of mine's name was shortened to "Connie." It makes me shudder to think of it.

I rather like Lorina as well, after a certain Miss Liddell's sister, and it would serve as a properly Victorian alternative to my rather common modern name. Ada is also lovely, I became quite enamored of it after reading Cold Mountain.

While doing a bit of digging into my ancestry, I discovered that my great-grandmother's first husband's surname was Kill, and thus her full name was Florence May Kill before her subsequent divorce and remarriage to my great-grandfather (who also had a capital name, but not to the same effect that Mr. Kill's had.)
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Orlando
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« Reply #186 on: May 23, 2008, 02:46:22 pm »

My own quest for a Steampunk pseudonym led me to peruse my own family tree which, although it yielded little of use to my primary objective, did reveal several rather pleasing names:
  • Everard


Unfortunately for anyone who remembers the camp comedian Larry Grayson from the 1970s, the name Everard is permanently tainted.  The intended joke may not be immediately obvious but I can't think of any polite way of making it clear.

I rather like Lorina as well, after a certain Miss Liddell's sister


Ah! This Miss Liddell.

The only other time I've heard that name is as Loreena McKennitt.

Orlando.

« Last Edit: May 23, 2008, 02:57:03 pm by Orlando » Logged
von Corax
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« Reply #187 on: May 23, 2008, 10:41:58 pm »

My own quest for a Steampunk pseudonym led me to peruse my own family tree which, although it yielded little of use to my primary objective, did reveal several rather pleasing names:
  • Everard


Unfortunately for anyone who remembers the camp comedian Larry Grayson from the 1970s, the name Everard is permanently tainted.


Fortunately, no-one actually remembers the 1970s.

In any case, it was (I understand) usually pronounced "Evrit" or "Evrid."
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Orlando
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« Reply #188 on: May 23, 2008, 11:08:21 pm »

...talking about the name Everard

In any case, it was (I understand) usually pronounced "Evrit" or "Evrid."

Ah, well that's fine then, and goes a long way to repair the damage done by Mr. Grayson.
It is a very uncommon name in Britain today so I've never met anyone who would be introduced as "Evrit"/"Evrid".
Another example of different possible pronunciation of names.

In Britain we pronounce the "col" in  Colin  like the "col" in "column".
Don't know about Canadians but the Americans pronounce Colin Powell for example, as "coe"-lin.

In Britain we pronounce the "ce" of  Cecil  as the "se" of "set".
Again, don't know about Canadians but the Americans often pronounce Cecil as "see"-sil.

Orlando.
« Last Edit: May 23, 2008, 11:59:14 pm by Orlando » Logged
von Corax
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« Reply #189 on: May 24, 2008, 01:45:57 am »


In Britain we pronounce the "col" in  Colin  like the "col" in "column".
Don't know about Canadians but the Americans pronounce Colin Powell for example, as "coe"-lin.


Around here, usually the former, although I have heard the latter as well.


In Britain we pronounce the "ce" of  Cecil  as the "se" of "set".
Again, don't know about Canadians but the Americans often pronounce Cecil as "see"-sil.


Around here, usually the latter; also the diminutive "Cec" is pronounced as "cease."
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« Reply #190 on: May 24, 2008, 04:22:35 am »

"Wackford Squeers" if it was good enough for Dickens it's good
enough for me!
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« Reply #191 on: May 24, 2008, 07:22:47 am »

I lobbied quite hard for my eldest to be named "Erik Myrhddin Emrys <surname>" but we ended up with "Eric Thomas <surname>" after his maternal (late, loved and lamented) grandfather. So it goes. Good choice.

My youngest (different Mom) was going to be "Emily Elisabeth", come Hell or high water. Luckily, I liked that name, but my opinion was never really solicited. Smiley
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« Reply #192 on: May 24, 2008, 08:16:00 pm »

In Britain we pronounce the "col" in  Colin  like the "col" in "column".
Don't know about Canadians but the Americans pronounce Colin Powell for example, as "coe"-lin.
Oddly, in the US it is pronounced with the short o. Mr. Powell, however, is an exception.
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Mrs. Sullivan
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« Reply #193 on: May 25, 2008, 06:51:43 pm »

In Britain we pronounce the "ce" of  Cecil  as the "se" of "set".
Again, don't know about Canadians but the Americans often pronounce Cecil as "see"-sil.

Orlando.


Possibly due to the popularity in the 1960's of a children's cartoon show, Beany and Cecil, about a small boy and his sea serpent.
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Lady Anne
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« Reply #194 on: May 29, 2008, 11:18:50 pm »

In Britain we pronounce the "ce" of  Cecil  as the "se" of "set".
Again, don't know about Canadians but the Americans often pronounce Cecil as "see"-sil.

Orlando.


Possibly due to the popularity in the 1960's of a children's cartoon show, Beany and Cecil, about a small boy and his sea serpent.

I had a great-great aunt named Cec (probably short for Cecile, though my family does have a penchant for masculine names for girls) and we pronounced it "cease."  I doubt one would want to be called Cec pronounced "cess" because it sounds like "cesspool."
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« Reply #195 on: May 29, 2008, 11:35:55 pm »

Aldyth.

A classmate of mine has it for a middle name. She claims it was either her grandmother's or great-grandmother's.
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Lola Holmgang
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« Reply #196 on: May 30, 2008, 06:04:28 am »

I'm torn between liking it and thinking it sounds like someone's saying it with a lisp.
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Lady Anne
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« Reply #197 on: May 31, 2008, 05:20:34 pm »

I like it.
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Prof. Edward Penrose
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« Reply #198 on: June 03, 2008, 01:29:00 am »

Speaking about old fashioned names, my grandmother has a very Steampunk-ish name AND nickname. Her name is Fidelmira, but all in the family call her Fidela.
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Edward H. Jenkins
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« Reply #199 on: June 05, 2008, 02:55:43 am »

Not quite as stylish as the other names in this thread is my middle Name: Edward.

Together with a fantasy characters last name, it gives quite a nice steampunkish name i think. Edward H. Jenkins. That's why i choose it to be my steampunk name. I like the sound of it  Cool
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