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Author Topic: Victorian names which ought to be revived.  (Read 61767 times)
Lady Penelope
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« Reply #100 on: April 17, 2008, 10:48:58 pm »

Pippa is a nickname for Philippa, another name not commonly heard nowadays.  The masculine forms (nicknames for Philip) are Pip and Pippin.
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LizPf
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« Reply #101 on: April 17, 2008, 10:55:23 pm »

<My first post>

I've always found the name Sophronia to be wonderfully Victorian ... not that I'd ever name a girl that!

Though there are a couple of Sophie's in my kids' school ... hmm...

--Liz
(I guess I should be Elizabeth here. But I don't like Elizabeth, and much prefer Liz. So pooh!)
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Laverna Lovett~
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« Reply #102 on: April 17, 2008, 11:07:08 pm »

What's wrong with Elizabeth?
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Jemima Annabelle Clough
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« Reply #103 on: April 17, 2008, 11:11:50 pm »

Pippa is a nickname for Philippa, another name not commonly heard nowadays.  The masculine forms (nicknames for Philip) are Pip and Pippin.

I love both Pippa and Philipa. Although when I was a child there was a range of dolls called Pippa, which is partly what it reminds me of!

The only real Pippa I can think of offhand is the three day eventer Pippa Funnell. I've worked with a Philipa (who got very upset if you shortened it to anything)
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« Reply #104 on: April 17, 2008, 11:26:53 pm »

Digging up fun names from my ancestry:
for men: Garland, Percival, Clayton, Oscar, Theron, Mathias, Elwood, Oswald
Now there's a name I like. To tell you a little secret: This is actually my first name. Here in Germany it isn't an uncommon name, however, although this particular spelling is.
(Who can guess where I got the idea to use it as a last name for my pseudonym?)
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Laverna Lovett~
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« Reply #105 on: April 17, 2008, 11:32:46 pm »

That's your first name? I really do like that name. My boyfriend is named Matthew, which is close, but Mathias just has some sort of class to it.
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Orlando
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« Reply #106 on: April 18, 2008, 12:04:45 am »

There is a gardener (on BBC Radio 4 "Gardener's Question Time") called Pippa Greenwood.

Orlando.
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Jemima Annabelle Clough
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When you're tired of tea, you're tired of life


« Reply #107 on: April 18, 2008, 12:07:35 am »

I had forgotten her! (And I listen to it quite frequently, too)
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cefriedl
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« Reply #108 on: April 18, 2008, 12:15:19 am »

What's wrong with Elizabeth?

It is just a little standard. I've known way too many people with the middle name Elizabeth, even another Carrie. It is better than Jessica I suppose, not that I dislike the name but it was INCREDIBLY common when I was younger. My sister's name is Jessica (but do not dare call her "Jess") and she had no less than 5 Jessica's in her kindergarten class.


Oh and Kaylee Elizabeth was our girl's name when we were expecting our first. We plan to use it when we do have a daughter, both my husband and I adore the name.
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Lady Penelope
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« Reply #109 on: April 18, 2008, 12:18:27 am »

Iphegenia, Virgil/Vergil, Homer, Marcus, Anthony/Antony, Ulysses, and other names of Classical extraction.  (Including Penelope, come to think.)
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Laverna Lovett~
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« Reply #110 on: April 18, 2008, 12:41:21 am »

Well honestly, Liz or Lizzie is more popular than Elizabeth. If the entire name was used, it would be a little less common. At least where i live. There are a lot of lizzies and such, but not many women with the name elizabeth actually go by elizabeth. not in my experience, at least.
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Riaghos Meridian
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« Reply #111 on: April 18, 2008, 01:04:16 am »

I've seen Elizabeth broken down into so many shortenings: Liz, Lizzie, Ebe, Libby, Beth

I knew a guy whose last name is Mathias. It is a cool name.

I recently found out my real name, Ryan, derives from the original Irish/gaelic spelling of Riaghan. How sweet is that? It means 'Little King' or 'kingly', and according to some sites 'water'. Thus, I'm using Water in my current screen name, taking Riaghan and changed it for some flare [basically so it would sound good with Meridian, which I really like as a last name].
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LizPf
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« Reply #112 on: April 18, 2008, 01:21:56 am »

What's wrong with Elizabeth?

Absolutely nothing -- for someone else.

It's just not my name.
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(null).exe
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« Reply #113 on: April 18, 2008, 10:44:47 am »

I think it is obvious that the only really proper Victorian man's name is Earnest, even if it's Algernon.
Oh fantastic! Excellent reference!

If I have a son I plan to call him Isaac.
Please, no. My real name's Isaac (thank you for spelling it correctly and not Issac or even worse Issiac) and every time someone withing hearing distance says "this is a..." or "there is a..." I always think they're saying my name.
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Rosel
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« Reply #114 on: April 18, 2008, 11:43:17 am »

I think it is obvious that the only really proper Victorian man's name is Earnest, even if it's Algernon.
Oh fantastic! Excellent reference!

If I have a son I plan to call him Isaac.
Please, no. My real name's Isaac (thank you for spelling it correctly and not Issac or even worse Issiac) and every time someone withing hearing distance says "this is a..." or "there is a..." I always think they're saying my name.

Hmm, aybe it depends if you are American or British, because to my ears the first sounds in  Isaac sounds nothing like "this is a..." or "there is a..."

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Laverna Lovett~
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« Reply #115 on: April 18, 2008, 08:39:52 pm »

It just depends on how you pronounce "a". You can pronounce it more like "uh" or you can pronounce it like "ay". It's pronounced both ways in America, depending on where you are. In the south it's more like "uh", which is the way i pronounce it most of the time, but it depends on what i'm saying.
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Silvia Lovett
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« Reply #116 on: April 18, 2008, 10:26:40 pm »

Catherine i love it and claire
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Sir Nikolas of Vendigroth
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« Reply #117 on: April 18, 2008, 10:30:24 pm »

My real name's Nicholas (see why i added that K?)
It means "spirit of the victorious", from the greek god Nike
I still like my spelling better, rlly.
I've even got greek gods on my side. Those pirates don't even know what they're up against.
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Silvia Lovett
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« Reply #118 on: April 18, 2008, 10:32:23 pm »

Victor, henry
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Mercy
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« Reply #119 on: April 18, 2008, 10:39:26 pm »

Hi, I'm one of those millions of people who's middle name is Elizabeth. I also have some of the country's most common first and surnames. I'd change my name legally, but I fear it might make me a pretentious little oink.

My first hamster was called Catherine. I was about seven at the time.

In my opinion using the full version of a name should be revived, Alexandrina sounds so much better than Alex, Victoria sounds better than Vicky, Cathy and Catherine and so on.
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Silvia Lovett
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« Reply #120 on: April 18, 2008, 10:44:03 pm »

Todd, Thomas, benjamin
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Steven S.
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« Reply #121 on: April 19, 2008, 01:12:25 am »

Engelbert Humperdinck is a personal favorite of mine...
He was a composer during the Victorian period.
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Orlando
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« Reply #122 on: April 19, 2008, 01:20:33 am »

My real name's Nicholas (see why i added that K?)
It means "spirit of the victorious", from the greek god Nike
I still like my spelling better, rlly.
I've even got greek gods on my side. Those pirates don't even know what they're up against.

Speak up Sir Nikolas !

Orlando.
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Alain Raethorne
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« Reply #123 on: April 19, 2008, 03:15:54 am »

I think it is obvious that the only really proper Victorian man's name is Earnest, even if it's Algernon.
Oh fantastic! Excellent reference!

If I have a son I plan to call him Isaac.
Please, no. My real name's Isaac (thank you for spelling it correctly and not Issac or even worse Issiac) and every time someone withing hearing distance says "this is a..." or "there is a..." I always think they're saying my name.

God, I nave that same problem when people say "exactly". I always think they're saying my name, Zach. So, to this, I generally respond with: "ex-what-ly?"
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« Reply #124 on: April 19, 2008, 08:28:17 am »


BTB is there a Victorian way to say "science fiction convention?"

Dr. B

Scientific Fable Convocation ?

Doc

Or perhaps "Meeting of the Society to study possible future scientific and societal changes as regarding speculative scientific developments... and fairys and dragons" ? Too long I fear, and this would be another thread entirely.

Yours digressively,
Dr. B
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