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Author Topic: My newest aquisition: $40 at a local antique shop.  (Read 5895 times)
Major Francis Cleverly
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States


« on: July 26, 2007, 08:48:02 pm »

Elgin pocketwatch.  SN 14680516.  This excellent site says the following:


Serial Number   SN Range Quanty Name Year grade size code   jewels Adj/reg/etc.
--------------  -------- ------ ---- ---- ----- ---- ------ ------ ------------
      14680516  14680001   1000      1909 381*   16s hbn6p     17j Adj
    first run of grade 381;  516 of 45000 in grade


grade total runs   first yr  last yr class  size  code   jewels Adj/name
----- ----- -----  --------  ------- -----  ----  ------ ------ ----------
381   45000  41        1909     1917  107    16s  hbn6p     17j Adj

(*) notes on grade 381:  bridge


Class 107:         16s HC 3/4 pend model 6
    305      26500 made bridge 15j
    339      50500 made bridge 17j
    381      45000 made bridge 17j Adj


It doesn't seem to have lost any time in the last several hours, but it's a little early to tell if it's keeping good time.  There are some scratches on the inside of the case (from jewelers no doubt): 

"A 10/8/42 Cln Set Spg."
"CMLiL"
"K8279"
"6/30/63 MS"
"47565R"



It does have a relatively clean cover (Jewel?) for the front, but it was a better photo with it removed.





I haven't owned a vintage pocketwatch and was pleasantly surprised to see this one for sale (and in good working order) so had to share it with everyone.
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Nothing.
okoshima
Guest
« Reply #1 on: July 26, 2007, 09:03:13 pm »

I have a question, well 3.

what are the pocket watch jewels?

and what are their purpose?

and also how do I tell how many on mine?

link to pics of mine:

HERE



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rogue_designer
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


clockwork gypsy


« Reply #2 on: July 26, 2007, 09:10:30 pm »

I have a question, well 3.

what are the pocket watch jewels?

and what are their purpose?

and also how do I tell how many on mine?

link to pics of mine:

HERE



the jewels are bearings - low friction bearings. Usually ruby or sapphire - things that can be polished very smooth, and are very very hard.

their purpose is to allow pieces of the watch to move with as little resistance, but as accurately as possible.

Usually, the case or the movement itself tells you how many jewels - it's impossible to tell from the outside otherwise. Even with a skeletonized movement, you won't see all of them.

Major Cleverly - that looks like it is a great find for $40. Nicely done. Very nice timepiece.

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Catapultam habeo. Nisi pecuniam omnem mihi dabis, ad caput tuum saxum immane mittam.
(Si hoc legere scis nimium eruditionis habes. But deserve a nice glass of absinthe. I have some Montemarte in the cabinet, if you wish.)
okoshima
Guest
« Reply #3 on: July 26, 2007, 09:16:41 pm »

nooooooo..... mine has nothing to say Sad its blank
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rogue_designer
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


clockwork gypsy


« Reply #4 on: July 26, 2007, 09:20:08 pm »

nooooooo..... mine has nothing to say Sad its blank


Looking at the pics (somewhat blurry) I see at least 3 jewels (they are the red bearings at the center of some of the larger gears). So, yours just doesn't say. I don't know enough about the manufacturer and movement of your watch, but it looks cool, and it works - unless you're a collector, what more do you want? Cheesy Enjoy it.
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okoshima
Guest
« Reply #5 on: July 26, 2007, 09:27:49 pm »

hmm I was being inquisitive... and not bad for my first real pocket watch?

walked into the jeweller's and they had a few but then they brought that out and I fell for it (strange really as there were some nice half hunters) it seems to keep time well but I don't know how to check for seconds (hints and sorry for threadjacking)

also meant to say this in last post

nice watch!

modified my post

it says fully jewled on a random site i found it on so id assume thats 17 and thank you for info and sorry again for threadjacking
« Last Edit: July 26, 2007, 09:48:52 pm by okoshima » Logged
shadowpuppet
Guest
« Reply #6 on: July 26, 2007, 09:30:37 pm »

I have a question, well 3.

what are the pocket watch jewels?

and what are their purpose?

and also how do I tell how many on mine?

As a jeweler for 10 years and a watch aficionado, I can provide some help in answering this.

The jewels in a mechanical pocket watch are small rubies or similar gems (garnets and sapphires are also used) that are positioned in various places where metal would otherwise rub against metal. This helps the watch remain more accurate (the less friction there is, the better), and stops the gears from scraping off metal shavings from one another that might soon gum up the works. The more jewels a watch has, the more accurate it will generally be, and the longer the gear wheels will last. Quartz (battery-operated) watches don't have much in the way of moving parts, so they generally don't have any jewels in them.

The jewels are almost always synthetic these days. Up until about the end of the 19th century, they were real, though they obviously weren't the fine gem-quality ones that could otherwise go into jewelry. The value of the ones in a watch is negligible.

As for how many are in yours, Mr. Okoshima, it's usually stamped somewhere on the case, the face or the movement itself. If it's not, you can try looking at the manufacturer's (or even a retailer's) website, and see if it mentions the jewel count in the item description. In the photographs you posted I can see a few, but there would be several others out of view, as well. 17-jewel is pretty standard, though I have seen some with more or less.
« Last Edit: July 26, 2007, 09:40:15 pm by shadowpuppet » Logged
shadowpuppet
Guest
« Reply #7 on: July 26, 2007, 09:35:12 pm »

Whoops! Speedily answered, Mr. Designer!

And yes, Major Cleverly, the Elgin was a very nice find, indeed! You'll get a great deal of enjoyment out of it, and with a little love, you will likely be able to pass it on to your children in working order.

Quote
It does have a relatively clean cover (Jewel?) for the front, but it was a better photo with it removed.

"Cover" would be correct.
« Last Edit: July 26, 2007, 09:39:51 pm by shadowpuppet » Logged
MrFats
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States

Heretic Chronogadgeteer


« Reply #8 on: July 27, 2007, 02:03:03 am »

Well, since we are on the subject of acquisitions, allow me to introduce:


My new elgin.


Another watch, cannot recall the name


Seems kind of cheap.
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Fueled by coffee, powered by steam
Scientist, philosopher, photographer, writer
HAC
Steam Theologian
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
Canada Canada


HAC_N800
« Reply #9 on: July 27, 2007, 03:14:37 am »

I have a question, well 3.

what are the pocket watch jewels?

and what are their purpose?

and also how do I tell how many on mine?

link to pics of mine:

HERE

Recent watch? Looks to be a Chinese movement, probably 7 jewel, but I'd need clearer pics for definite ID..
Jewels, as said, are primarily bearings, and they do need the slightest amount of lubrication to function correctly. They also serve the purpose, to a lesser degree, of shaft alignment. A good watch will usually start at 17J, and work up. 23 is usually considered to be the norm for a quality watch. It also is important as to how the jewels are mounted in the plates.  Lowest on the totem pole there is jewels pressed into the plates, followed by jewels in pressed gold mounts, followed by jewels in screwed in gold chatons.
Here's a movement pic of my 1950's Hamilton 992b pocket watch. Ypu can clearly see the jewels and shaft ends..



Cheers
Harold

Cheers
Harold




[/quote]
« Last Edit: July 27, 2007, 03:16:51 am by HAC » Logged

You never know what lonesome is , 'til you get to herdin' cows.
Vienna Fahrmann
Zeppelin Admiral
******
Austria Austria


« Reply #10 on: July 27, 2007, 03:34:54 am »


     Dear Major Francis,

     What a beautiful watch.  It's so satisfying to see an object with such nice details, both inside & out.

       
     Vienna
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Keithe
Snr. Officer
****
Canada Canada


Minister of Ambiguity, Indeterminacy and Vagueness


« Reply #11 on: July 30, 2007, 11:02:53 pm »

Hello all;
I thought I would share my weekend finds...
I finally found "THE PERFECT WATCH".  The pocketwatch I found is called "The Perfect Watch" by CELCO. It is not a high quality watch but the name was too good to pass on.


The second object is a pocket watch compass which will no doubt prove useful.




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Sir Theodore Catchpole
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States


« Reply #12 on: July 31, 2007, 07:12:03 am »

I have a question, well 3.

what are the pocket watch jewels?

and what are their purpose?

and also how do I tell how many on mine?

link to pics of mine:

HERE

Recent watch? Looks to be a Chinese movement, probably 7 jewel, but I'd need clearer pics for definite ID..
Jewels, as said, are primarily bearings, and they do need the slightest amount of lubrication to function correctly. They also serve the purpose, to a lesser degree, of shaft alignment. A good watch will usually start at 17J, and work up. 23 is usually considered to be the norm for a quality watch. It also is important as to how the jewels are mounted in the plates.  Lowest on the totem pole there is jewels pressed into the plates, followed by jewels in pressed gold mounts, followed by jewels in screwed in gold chatons.
Here's a movement pic of my 1950's Hamilton 992b pocket watch. Ypu can clearly see the jewels and shaft ends..



Cheers
Harold

Cheers
Harold





[/quote]


that is an AMAZING pictor
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