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Author Topic: Corduroy?  (Read 3628 times)
Hydrargyrum
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« on: June 16, 2007, 07:12:03 am »

I've been unsure about this for a while now; I thought I was on the right track when I began, but the more I learn about Steampunk, the more I think I'm wrong. Is corduroy, specifically corduroy pants, at all Victorian or Steampunk?
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Baron Verndorf
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« Reply #1 on: June 16, 2007, 07:21:48 am »

Depends where you fall. I do believe that corduroy have been around for a good long while, and, propperly used, could be victorian in a lower class, blue coller way. Steampunk? It's all in how you use it mate.
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wandering_nomad
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« Reply #2 on: June 16, 2007, 07:24:45 am »

Not only potentially steampunk, but the most comfortable kind of pants ever made.
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Flynn MacCallister
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« Reply #3 on: June 16, 2007, 08:41:22 am »

Steampunk =/= recreationism (although it can, if you really want).

As Baron Verndorf observes, it is likely to suit "blue collar" -- you know, engineer style, etc -- particularly well.
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Hydrargyrum
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« Reply #4 on: June 16, 2007, 12:19:38 pm »

That's actually good to hear; My original "designs" were for that of a more workshop engineer look, so I'd managed to go right with it. Granted, I'm going for a higher-class look with my outfit now, but I can sort of mix and match, or at least use some of my clothes for a second outfit, probably use the dress shirt as part of it when it inevitably gets an irremovable grey stain.
Perhaps this is the dawn of two outfits; The dressed up, finished inventor waistcoat/cloak and polished gizmos, and the innovator, less-refined-looking clothing and trinkets.
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Flynn MacCallister
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« Reply #5 on: June 16, 2007, 12:23:58 pm »

Why not? Any sensible person would have workshop cclothes and town clothes, surely?
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Hydrargyrum
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« Reply #6 on: June 16, 2007, 12:43:31 pm »

I agree. And don't call me Shirley.
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Flynn MacCallister
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« Reply #7 on: June 16, 2007, 12:46:35 pm »

... That went completely over my head.
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wandering_nomad
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« Reply #8 on: June 16, 2007, 01:35:19 pm »

... That went completely over my head.
Say the two posts out loud.
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Flynn MacCallister
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« Reply #9 on: June 16, 2007, 11:48:40 pm »

... Ah. I see. That would appear be a very accent-specific play on words. To me, Shirley has a very strong hissing sh and sounds like like "share, leigh", but surely sounds more like "tchoore-lee" (with "oo" as in door). Hence the not getting it.

Edit: also, is it coincidence that your avatar, wandering_nomad, reminds me terribly of Neil Gaiman's Sandman?
« Last Edit: June 16, 2007, 11:57:18 pm by Flynn MacCallister » Logged
HAC
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« Reply #10 on: June 16, 2007, 11:54:19 pm »

I think corduroy came in to manufacture in the early 1800's, so the timeframe is right...
Cheers
Harold
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Hydrargyrum
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« Reply #11 on: June 16, 2007, 11:59:35 pm »

I think corduroy came in to manufacture in the early 1800's, so the timeframe is right...
Cheers
Harold
Indeed it was.
... Ah. I see. That would appear be a very accent-specific play on words. To me, Shirley has a very strong hissing sh and sounds like like "share, leigh", but surely sounds more like "tchoore-lee" (with "oo" as in door). Hence the not getting it.
T'wasn't my joke to begin with. I believe it was made popular by the movie "Airplane!"
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Utilitarian Prototype
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« Reply #12 on: June 17, 2007, 08:03:13 am »

And it was used extensively by railroad workers and the like, in much of the 1800's
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« Reply #13 on: June 18, 2007, 11:52:00 pm »

Corduroy was worn very extensively during the Victorian era and not just by the working class. The British military used it widely - known as Bedford cord -mostly for mounted troops including officers which in class-conscious Britain says much. It seems to have been preferred in South Africa over the more usual khaki during the time of the Anglo-Zulu War (1879) with some colonial units being fully uniformed in corduroy – generally black. It was also widely used by the ubiquitous “great white hunters” as part of their standard kit in both jackets and pants. I believe that H. Rider. Haggard even outfitted Allan Quartermain in cord clothing
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princebishop
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« Reply #14 on: June 19, 2007, 07:00:29 pm »

corduroy has been around for a LONG time.  it started out as cut velvet.  it was used amongst the upper classes for country wear, hunting, riding, rolling in the hay. 

cheers,

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« Reply #15 on: June 20, 2007, 08:35:35 pm »

Yes, probably from the 17th Century. Cord du Roi  - the cloth of kings.
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Alderman Simeon
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« Reply #16 on: June 21, 2007, 07:35:56 am »

Yes, probably from the 17th Century. Cord du Roi  - the cloth of kings.


That seems to depend on who you believe.
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Bines
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« Reply #17 on: February 26, 2016, 05:22:47 am »

Like corduroy though the ages, this thread shall rise again!

Yes. It depends on who you read. GQ magazine has a precursor to corduroy, Fustian, exiting in Egyptian times B.C. Other writings state it was popular with the 19th century labouring and laboring classes, outdoors-men, and mid to late century militaries. 

The fabric was popular because it was affordable are durable. Shirley, such a fabric has a place in Steampunk, with all it's engineers, time travelers and adventuring scientists.

The question arises because so much historical literature on Victorian dress focuses on what the English upper middle to upper class wore. I maintain that such a historical and versatile fabric has a firm place in Steampunk. Especially for someone wanting to create a rugged and less than common place character.
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Bines
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« Reply #18 on: February 26, 2016, 05:25:19 am »

And such a character could be gussied up with a nice derby and a pair of laced or buttoned leather ankle boots.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #19 on: February 26, 2016, 07:49:36 am »

Like corduroy though the ages, this thread shall rise again!

Yes. It depends on who you read. GQ magazine has a precursor to corduroy, Fustian, exiting in Egyptian times B.C. Other writings state it was popular with the 19th century labouring and laboring classes, outdoors-men, and mid to late century militaries.  

The fabric was popular because it was affordable are durable. Shirley, such a fabric has a place in Steampunk, with all it's engineers, time travelers and adventuring scientists.

The question arises because so much historical literature on Victorian dress focuses on what the English upper middle to upper class wore. I maintain that such a historical and versatile fabric has a firm place in Steampunk. Especially for someone wanting to create a rugged and less than common place character.

Good answer.


1756 advertisement mentioning "corderoys"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corduroy
« Last Edit: February 26, 2016, 07:55:29 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged

Crescat Scientia
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« Reply #20 on: February 27, 2016, 03:08:55 pm »

Corduroy is far older than the Victorian era.

A luxurious ribbed velvet, "cord du roi" ("cord/fabric of the king") was originally used by nobility.

I'm not sure when cotton corduroy became a thing, but "corduroy" shows up a lot in high-class wardrobes at least as far back as the seventeenth century.
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« Reply #21 on: March 01, 2016, 08:42:53 pm »

Corduroy is far older than the Victorian era.

A luxurious ribbed velvet, "cord du roi" ("cord/fabric of the king") was originally used by nobility.

I'm not sure when cotton corduroy became a thing, but "corduroy" shows up a lot in high-class wardrobes at least as far back as the seventeenth century.


The corded type of fabric we know today emerged in the 18th C, but Corduroy is a type of cotton fabric known as Fustian, which dates back to the Pre-Mediaeval period and Pre-
 Arabian Egypt - around 200 AD in the city of Fustan according to this source:

http://visforvintage.net/2012/05/03/history-of-corduroy/

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

*Edited for nomenclature accuracy - as stated by others Fustian would not be Arabian Egypt, but rather Coptic Egypt.
« Last Edit: March 06, 2016, 03:40:41 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
T. C. Halloway
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« Reply #22 on: March 02, 2016, 01:37:21 am »

I inherited a knee length corduroy coat from my grandfather that I consider very Steampunk. Especially since it is covered in oil and grease stains from when he wore it while working on his car.
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