The Steampunk Forum at Brass Goggles
October 19, 2021, 11:14:32 pm *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Brassgoggles.co.uk - The Lighter Side Of Steampunk, follow @brasstech for forum technical problems & updates.
 
   Home   Blog Help Rules Login Register  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: What would average speeds be for airship/ steamships/ trains?  (Read 4325 times)
Armydillo978
Officer
***
United States United States



WWW
« on: August 24, 2009, 02:11:55 am »

of the 1870 time period?  I had thought a simple google search for airship speeds; steam train speeds; steamship speeds and variants of those would have resulted in  a response; alas, little to no...except for steamships.

I'm working on a print n play game that give players the choice between travel by airships, steam trains, or steam ships from the 1870 time period.  All modes of travel can be within a 10year window from that date.  The travel destinations are between the continent, the US, and the far east.  I would be using generic/average speeds for the game. Any help would be appreciated and get you a byline in the end product.  Smiley

Bill
Logged

----------------------
"Sometimes you roll the dice and come up with craps."
kirinyaga
Gunner
**
France France


« Reply #1 on: August 24, 2009, 01:45:58 pm »

I don't know about the 1860-1880 period but I can tell you about 1930, which may give you an idea of the rate of speeds between transports.

The Hindenburg zeppelin went from Europe to USA in 2.5 days, while the fastest ships did it in 5 days and most common ships in 10 days. Steam trains were about as fast as zeppelins, averaging 120-130 km/h. Only express trains could maintain that speed however, other ones had to stop in a lot of stations.

Some modern trains are actually going slower than express steam trains from the beginning of 20th century Wink
Logged
jringling
Time Traveler
****
United States United States


convicted Rogue and Vagabond…long story…


WWW
« Reply #2 on: August 24, 2009, 02:02:56 pm »

For the steam trains, this site offers information about races around your desired time, so the speeds may be alittle faster than the average:
http://mikes.railhistory.railfan.net/r070.html


Given this, if a train leaves the station heading east at 5mph, and an airship leaves Chicago at the same time... Grin
Logged

maltedfalcon
Gunner
**
United States United States


« Reply #3 on: August 24, 2009, 07:25:36 pm »

The Goodyear blimp flat out runs about 35 mph...
now if that is into a headwind of 10 mph the top speed would be 25mph
a headwind of 20mph (A- they dont fly, and B - the would scream along into the wind at 15mph)
now with the wind... add 35mph to any tail wind to get the max speed.

The same was true of larger airships but 75-80mph was around top speed for most.
Logged
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #4 on: August 24, 2009, 07:59:35 pm »

Steamships- the fastest steamers on the Atlantic could make 15-16 knots in the 1870s.   See here for average speeds of all Blue Riband winners. 
Trains- to run the 400-miles or so between London and Edinburgh/Glasgow generally took 8 hours on the fastest trains, but this includes (on the East Coast line) half an hour's stop in York and (on the West Coast) locomotive changes at either Stafford or Crewe.  So say 55-60 mph. 
Airships- according to wikipedia (and therefore taken with a potentially lethal dose of salt) the French airship La France was capable of about 3 metres per second in optimum conditions.  Count Zeppelin's first effort was capable of about 6 metres per second. 
   
Logged

Persons intending to travel by open carriage should select a seat with their backs to the engine, by which means they will avoid the ashes emitted therefrom, that in travelling generally, but particularly through the tunnels, prove a great annoyance; the carriage farthest from the engine will in consequence be found the most desirable.
Armydillo978
Officer
***
United States United States



WWW
« Reply #5 on: August 25, 2009, 12:38:21 am »

So, if the distance from New York to London is about 3,400 miles, than a speed of 15 knot (about 17mph) would take a trip time of about 8-9 days depending on ocean conditions.  Sorry, not a math whiz here.  Smiley

Thanks for the info guys...this helps out alot.
« Last Edit: August 25, 2009, 12:43:49 am by Armydillo978 » Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.113 seconds with 16 queries.