The Steampunk Forum at Brass Goggles
June 19, 2019, 09:43:06 am *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Support BrassGoggles! Donate once or $3/mo.
 See details here.
 
   Home   Blog Help Rules Login Register  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Finishing wood: Waterproofing and staining  (Read 5800 times)
Sulecen
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States


You kill me with that machine-gun laugh


« on: July 31, 2009, 05:25:58 pm »

So I was led here to inquire as to how would one finish wood in a natural way, without using polyurethane or nasty chemicals. The background on my question is that I'm carving beads from found oak, and I'm getting to the point that I actually have enough to make a necklace for my Steam Celt outfit. I don't want to use the modern way of finishing, since the wood is found, meaning not even cut down, so it would feel wrong to slather chemicals all over them. One fellow in another forum suggested mixing beeswax and walnut oil, the wax to waterproof and the oil to stain the wood. If any one has any experience or ideas, I would greatly appreciate the input!
Logged

The Road goes ever on and on
    Down from the door where it began.
    Now far ahead the Road has gone,
    And I must follow, if I can,
    Pursuing it with eager feet,
    Until it joins some larger way
    Where many paths and errands meet.
    And whither then? I cannot say.
HAC
Steam Theologian
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
Canada Canada


HAC_N800
« Reply #1 on: July 31, 2009, 05:39:34 pm »

You might want to look at a tung oil finish. Tung oil will give a wet look, slighly darker finish, with an amber tone. It will also seal and waterproof the wood. Polymerised tung oil will also work, but it has a slight greenish cast. That can be negated by adding a small amount of a reddish (I find a cherry or red oak works) tonetic stain to the tung oil.

Cheers
Harold
Logged

You never know what lonesome is , 'til you get to herdin' cows.
Otto Von Pifka
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


goggles? they're here somewhere.....


« Reply #2 on: August 01, 2009, 06:07:52 am »

linseed oil is an option.
Logged
Khem Caigan
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
United States United States


Aut Inveniam Viam Aut Faciam


WWW
« Reply #3 on: August 01, 2009, 07:40:38 am »

I'm carving beads from found oak, and I'm getting to the point that I actually have enough to make a necklace for my Steam Celt outfit. I don't want to use the modern way of finishing, since the wood is found, meaning not even cut down, so it would feel wrong to slather chemicals all over them. One fellow in another forum suggested mixing beeswax and walnut oil, the wax to waterproof and the oil to stain the wood. If any one has any experience or ideas, I would greatly appreciate the input!

Here you go - no mineral spirits, methanol,
petroleum distillates or synthetic colourings :

1 cup walnut oil
1/2 cup Bushmills whiskey
1-1/2 oz grated beeswax
2 oz carnauba wax
5 drops of essential oil of vanilla
(brings out the natural vanillins in the oak)
5 drops of essential oil of oak moss
(good "base note" for the oak wood)

Measure out the whiskey and pour it into a
clean jar.

Add the essential oils to the whiskey, cap
the jar tightly and shake it to blend.

Grate the beeswax using a cheese-grater,
or shave it with a knife.

Granulate the carnauba wax by putting it
into a paper bag and gently striking it with
a rock.

Put the walnut oil and all of the wax into the
top of a double boiler and set it over water
that is simmering in the bottom half.

Keep stirring until all of the wax has dissolved
into the walnut oil.

Remove from heat, allow it to cool down for
a few minutes, then add the whiskey and
essential oil mixture and blend well.

Pour it out into clean tins or cans, and allow
it to cool down and harden. Make sure that
you have lids for these, as you want to
slow down the evaporation of the volatile
essential oils and the ethanol and water
from the wax emulsion.

Let it sit for a few days.

Use a rag to rub the wax mixture into your
beads.

Then lightly moisten a rag with a little walnut
oil, and rub that over your beads.

Buff the beads with a dry cloth.

Note : If you want to stain your oak beads a
dark black colour, put some old nails or some
steel wool in a jar and cover with vinegar.

After a few weeks, brew up a pot of strong tea,
and steep your beads in it for awhile ( tannins
are your friend ).

Dry your beads, then paint them over with the
"iron tonic", and rub them dry.

Once you get the beads as dark as you wish,
you can sand them lightly and wax them.

[ Addendum : Walnut oil isn't dark - it is much
brighter than linseed oil (for example), so much
so that I use it instead of linseed oil for grinding
my pigments when I paint in oils, after I have
rinsed it with water and bleached it further in
the sun. ]
« Last Edit: August 01, 2009, 08:10:30 am by Khem Caigan » Logged

"Let us create vessels and sails fashioned for the heavenly Æther, for there
will be plenty of people who do not shrink from the vastness of space."
~ Johannes Kepler, letter to Galileo Galilei, 1609.
Sulecen
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States


You kill me with that machine-gun laugh


« Reply #4 on: August 01, 2009, 05:03:26 pm »

Well then! Thank you for such precise instructions, me thinks I'll have to try that formula out once I am moved, and can gather all the materials! I have tried Tung oil so far on a test piece, and it seems to work well also, it's just hard to see results since I'm working in such a small medium.
Logged
Otto Von Pifka
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


goggles? they're here somewhere.....


« Reply #5 on: August 01, 2009, 05:18:34 pm »

I like to color wood with a torch, its pretty much like making toast. get it too dark and you can sand it a bit to lighten it back up.
it can save a ton of sanding too, you jump from coarse to fine. I've also used it to burn off any "fuzzies" that lift up after using linseed oil.
Logged
Khem Caigan
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
United States United States


Aut Inveniam Viam Aut Faciam


WWW
« Reply #6 on: August 01, 2009, 07:19:42 pm »

Well then! Thank you for such precise instructions, me thinks I'll have to try that formula out once I am moved, and can gather all the materials! I have tried Tung oil so far on a test piece, and it seems to work well also, it's just hard to see results since I'm working in such a small medium.


You are very welcome, and I look forward
to seeing you at the Order of the Brazen
Dawn
!

Note :

It is possible to purchase pure Tung oil,
that doesn't have any toxic substances
such as driers or petroleum distillates
added to it - here is one source that I
can recommend :

Pure Tung Oil
(Chinawood oil)
@The Real Milk Paint Company
http://tinyurl.com/ktg6bj
Logged
stockton_joans
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom


« Reply #7 on: August 03, 2009, 01:05:11 pm »

i told you someone would know and I'm not supprised that it was khem, he seems to know a lot about a lot.
Logged

Stockton Joans:
Gentleman
Tinkerer
Part time Illithid hunter
Sir Nikolas of Vendigroth
Guest
« Reply #8 on: August 03, 2009, 01:42:51 pm »

I've used this method in the past:

Cover the surface to be treated in epoxy resin, and let the resin set. Sand the surface back to bare wood, but no further. This will seal the grain.

Sand to 400-grit, and apply linseed oil, allow the linseed oil to set. Sand to 800-grit, lightly and apply beeswax-based polish. This will give a smooth, lustrous finish that's grippy and shows off the wood to its best advantage.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.118 seconds with 17 queries.