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Author Topic: where the smeg can I buy Copper II Sulphate  (Read 7480 times)
Lord Jason Blackwell
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« on: June 25, 2009, 09:51:21 am »

exactly what the title says, i want to do some electroplate etching but i can't find the stuff in Calgary
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darkshines
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« Reply #1 on: June 25, 2009, 10:13:42 am »

Funny you should mention "smeg"............


No I'm kidding, I can't help, I just wanted to make that joke.
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Prof_Auerbach
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« Reply #2 on: June 25, 2009, 12:32:10 pm »

Since the chemical is FDA regulated, I'm not sure about shipping to Canada, but there are numerous chemical suppliers online that provide CuSO4, such as http://www.advance-scientific.com/Results.asp?Catalog=cupric+sulfate&source=general&go.x=0&go.y=0&go=go

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NazT
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« Reply #3 on: June 25, 2009, 12:39:55 pm »

I got copper sulphate (same??) from a fabric dye company.  Its used as a mordant.  Worked a treat making brass etchings.
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jringling
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« Reply #4 on: June 25, 2009, 12:57:05 pm »

I use a root killer for septic lines which is available from my local hardware store (Lowes)... I am not sure if it is Copper II Sulphate, but it works great for my etching...
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Smaggers
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« Reply #5 on: June 25, 2009, 01:44:03 pm »

I got some from ebay.   Grin
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prairieson
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« Reply #6 on: June 25, 2009, 09:10:28 pm »

Unless you have a particular reason for using copper sulfate, I've found that concentrated salt water makes for a fine etching solution. Also, it's less environmentally hazardous and much less expensive than copper sulfate.
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Prof. Boris van Galvin
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« Reply #7 on: June 25, 2009, 11:36:55 pm »

An alternative could be to use Cupric Acid.  I use this to etch both Brass and Copper and have achieved some very fine detail. It’s a non electrolytic process and the formula is reusable over and over again. One issue with electro stripping is that the copper is released into the water then you empty the water out and this is highly toxic and not environmentally friendly.

Create your initial etch solution by using Hydrochloric Acid and Hydrogen Peroxide. Care must be taken not to inhale the fumes as they are defiantly not good for you but then the same applies to salt water hydrolysis.

You should be able to purchase 6% Hydrogen Peroxide from your local chemist and 30~40% Hydrochloric from your local pool supply company. Measure 2 Parts Hydrogen Peroxide in to a NON METALIC container then add 1 Part Hydrochloric (ADD ACID TO WATER) so Hydrogen Peroxide first as its mostly water and Hydrochloric last.

Here are a few samples of what has been etched. and more can be found on the http://www.evilgenius.net.nz website under Blogs and in Gallery.

Feel free to fire me any questions about the process or mixture.

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Prof. van Galvin
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Prof. Boris van Galvin
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von Corax
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« Reply #8 on: June 26, 2009, 04:56:24 am »

We have a 1 kg can of copper II sulphate (the blue stuff) in the cellar. The label says "Rootkill", and the price tag says "Home Hardware." We bought it to clean tree roots out of the septic tank weeping bed. If you can't find a Home Hardware in Calgary, try Rona or Canadian Tire.

If you're reluctant to put copper sulphate solution down the drain, mix it with some sodium carbonate (washing soda.) You end up with a sodium sulphate solution (it's used in soapmaking, so it should be safe to flush) and solid copper carbonate precipitate, which is nearly completely insoluble in water. Run it through a coffee filter, and then either put the filter in the garbage or save it for your home chemistry experiments... Tongue
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Morningstar1981
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« Reply #9 on: June 26, 2009, 11:13:43 pm »

It's possibly poor form to link to other forums, but since the subject matter is so far from what we enjoy here, in many respects, I think this is permissable.
http://www.sciencemadness.org/talk/viewthread.php?tid=3254 contains many suppliers listed all over the globe for various things.
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Prof Eumides Blakehurst
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« Reply #10 on: June 29, 2009, 01:33:54 am »

Apart from hardware stores, gardening stores should carry it as well (though probably more expensive there than at a hardware store). It's used to kill algae on concrete paths or in ornamental ponds, and to kill moss on concrete as well (to stop them being slippery and dangerous to walk on).

Yes, copper II sulphate is the blue stuff, also called bluestone or blue vitriol (as it is made from reacting copper with sulphuric acid - a.k.a. oil of vitriol in the old language).
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Lord Jason Blackwell
Gunner
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Canada Canada


so many weapons, so little carrying space


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« Reply #11 on: June 29, 2009, 07:58:41 am »

We have a 1 kg can of copper II sulphate (the blue stuff) in the cellar. The label says "Rootkill", and the price tag says "Home Hardware." We bought it to clean tree roots out of the septic tank weeping bed. If you can't find a Home Hardware in Calgary, try Rona or Canadian Tire.

If you're reluctant to put copper sulphate solution down the drain, mix it with some sodium carbonate (washing soda.) You end up with a sodium sulphate solution (it's used in soapmaking, so it should be safe to flush) and solid copper carbonate precipitate, which is nearly completely insoluble in water. Run it through a coffee filter, and then either put the filter in the garbage or save it for your home chemistry experiments... Tongue

Huzzah, another calgarian. i believe there is a home hardware by Macloud and Heritage if i remember right. i shall try there, thanks.
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Phineas Lamar Alexander
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United States United States



« Reply #12 on: June 30, 2009, 02:32:29 am »

Oh good You've found a supplier in Canada!
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Mr. Able
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« Reply #13 on: June 30, 2009, 03:44:22 am »

Apart from hardware stores, gardening stores should carry it as well (though probably more expensive there than at a hardware store). It's used to kill algae on concrete paths or in ornamental ponds, and to kill moss on concrete as well (to stop them being slippery and dangerous to walk on).

Yes, copper II sulphate is the blue stuff, also called bluestone or blue vitriol (as it is made from reacting copper with sulphuric acid - a.k.a. oil of vitriol in the old language).

It's dangerous to use the stuff for plants as it's often not pure.

Posting a link after this for a good source.
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Mr. Able
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« Reply #14 on: June 30, 2009, 03:45:54 am »

http://secure.sciencecompany.com/Cupric-Copper-Sulfate-Crystal-500g--P6367C670.aspx

And read this:

http://www.nontoxicprint.com/etchzincsteelaluminum.htm

And there you are.
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von Corax
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Prof. Darwin Prætorius von Corax


« Reply #15 on: June 30, 2009, 04:37:25 am »

Huzzah, another calgarian...

Actually, I'm in Ontario. My permanent base of operations is outside The Deforested City, but I'm currently living at the edge of The City At The Centre Of Itself.

In any case, I'm glad I could help.
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Prof Eumides Blakehurst
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Australia Australia


Scientist by Training, Mad by Practice.


« Reply #16 on: July 01, 2009, 12:26:10 am »

It's dangerous to use the stuff for plants as it's often not pure.

Which is why it's used for killing algae. (Actually, if you have a good pair of electric scales, make your own algicide for fish tanks - far cheaper than buying the stuff from a pet shop.)

The stuff from plant or hardware stores is usually around 99.0 - 99.5% pure, and the main impurity is iron sulphate. When it comes to etching brass or copper, the iron is not a problem at all. It's also not a problem if you are making large crystals of copper sulphate and so on, and it's still pure enough to make Fehling's solutions for testing for reducing sugars in brewing.
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