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Author Topic: Non-steamed steampunk guns  (Read 428595 times)
Story
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« Reply #400 on: January 06, 2012, 01:55:27 am »

I just have to say. As much as I love those submachine guns, I do not find them to be terribly  steamy...


Check out the 1901 Mannlicher carbine
http://rockislandauction.com/viewitem/aid/53/lid/1393
Forgotten Weapons - Mannlicher 1901 Carbine
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      Two thousand pounds of education
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Story
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« Reply #401 on: January 07, 2012, 07:33:46 pm »

Less than a meter long, but packing a wallop - for only $25k.

Quote
The last Waziristan Campaign of 1894 put this area under British Control however the remoteness meant that many British Garrisons were left isolated in hostile hill country. The mountain fortresses were secure but were venerable to mass attacks in that the terrain provided extensive close cover to any assailant. To avoid being over run it was decided that quick firing Cannons shooting grapeshot type loads would be the best solution to counter mass infantry assaults.

The region was isolated and time was short so obsolete late 18th century muzzle loading bronze cannons left over from the Napoleonic wars were pressed into service one last time. These were converted into M-1895 Breach loaders and installed into fixed fortress positions to repel any attack.


http://www.ima-usa.com/original-british-1895-bronze-6lb-breech-loading-cannon-from-the-northwest-frontier.html
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Edmund Charles Rutherford
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« Reply #402 on: January 07, 2012, 09:03:57 pm »

The only real weapon I own that would fall into the steampunk category would be my repro 1858 Remington: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Remington_Model_1858.  It is a great pistol, and was VERY popular even into the later periods.
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Edmund

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KABAR2
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« Reply #403 on: January 08, 2012, 02:24:26 am »

The only real weapon I own that would fall into the steampunk category would be my repro 1858 Remington: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Remington_Model_1858.  It is a great pistol, and was VERY popular even into the later periods.


I too prefer the solid frame of the Remington over the Colts of that era.... although those with a large hand have to get used to it compaired to the fit of an 1860 Colt...... also the remington was actually easier to convert to cartridge than the Colts.....
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Edmund Charles Rutherford
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While there's tea, there's hope -Sir Arthur Pinero


« Reply #404 on: January 08, 2012, 02:45:21 am »

Indeed.  I have used both weapons (the Colt, and the Remington) and in my opinion the Remington is superior...which is why I bought it instead of the Colt.  The Colt certainly has looks going for it, but as far as functionality, reliability, and durability, the Remington was by far a better gun.  There's a reason it was one of the most popular sidearms for gunmen and lawmen alike.  And it was popular with the military as well.
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KABAR2
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« Reply #405 on: January 08, 2012, 08:20:03 am »

Less than a meter long, but packing a wallop - for only $25k.

Quote
The last Waziristan Campaign of 1894 put this area under British Control however the remoteness meant that many British Garrisons were left isolated in hostile hill country. The mountain fortresses were secure but were venerable to mass attacks in that the terrain provided extensive close cover to any assailant. To avoid being over run it was decided that quick firing Cannons shooting grapeshot type loads would be the best solution to counter mass infantry assaults.

The region was isolated and time was short so obsolete late 18th century muzzle loading bronze cannons left over from the Napoleonic wars were pressed into service one last time. These were converted into M-1895 Breach loaders and installed into fixed fortress positions to repel any attack.


http://www.ima-usa.com/original-british-1895-bronze-6lb-breech-loading-cannon-from-the-northwest-frontier.html


IMA has a way of streaching things with their history..... these bronze guns are Danish they were captured from their navy in the early 1800's and sent to Napal, used these cannon not the British,
Napal sent engineering students to Japan to learn in their armories when these student came back
they started an upgrade program of Napal's defenses converting these guns into breech loaders....
the cannon has a Napalese crest on top.... no British markings.... I know someone who owns one of these cannon he is in the process of mounting it on a carraige I will see if I can get photos of it posted when finished.
« Last Edit: January 09, 2012, 05:32:49 am by KABAR2 » Logged
Otto Von Pifka
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« Reply #406 on: January 08, 2012, 11:57:19 am »

that carbine is a neat little gun, odd that the foregrip moved with the barrel. they must have had to keep an eye on the mass of the wood, it could definitely effect the cycling of the gun.
a small piece in front of the magazine well to act as a grip area or an area to set the gun down on an improvised rest would have made it easier to manage.

excellent link!
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Story
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« Reply #407 on: January 16, 2012, 05:55:12 am »

Y'all seen this Revolving Shotgun Built From Scratch?
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elvisroe
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« Reply #408 on: January 16, 2012, 06:08:07 am »



I love that!!!
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KABAR2
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« Reply #409 on: January 16, 2012, 07:32:50 am »

He actually has a couple of other builds out there.... I'll see what I can find...
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Story
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« Reply #410 on: January 23, 2012, 04:22:03 pm »

He actually has a couple of other builds out there.... I'll see what I can find...

Well?
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KABAR2
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« Reply #411 on: January 24, 2012, 04:13:44 pm »

He actually has a couple of other builds out there.... I'll see what I can find...

Well?

Well I have been a little busy with other things like my house being broke into and a real job.
When I get a chance I will dig up the link it's on another site.

O.K.?
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Story
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« Reply #412 on: February 01, 2012, 06:33:58 pm »


O.K.?


Sure.

Meanwhile, hat tip to Professor Marvel

"Rare Historic and Deluxe Tiffany & Co. Smith & Wesson .32 Double Action 4th Model Revolver Exhibited by the Factory at the 1893 "World's Columbian Exposition" in Chicago"

apparently sold for $103,500


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Edmund Charles Rutherford
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While there's tea, there's hope -Sir Arthur Pinero


« Reply #413 on: February 14, 2012, 05:32:09 am »

You know...I forgot that I do have one other handgun that is technically a "Steampunk" (ie Victorian era) weapon.  I own a Nagant 1895 Revolver.  It fires a 7.62x38R (measured in millimeters.  The "R" stands for "rimmed") cartridge.  Designed in 1895 (obviously) and used by both the Imperial Russian Army (The White Army) and the Bolsheviks (The Red Army).  Although it came into being near the end of the Victorian era, I believe it still counts (correct me if I'm wrong), so that makes TWO Steampunk weapons I own.
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greatestescaper
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« Reply #414 on: February 14, 2012, 04:17:45 pm »

You know...I forgot that I do have one other handgun that is technically a "Steampunk" (ie Victorian era) weapon.  I own a Nagant 1895 Revolver.  It fires a 7.62x38R (measured in millimeters.  The "R" stands for "rimmed") cartridge.  Designed in 1895 (obviously) and used by both the Imperial Russian Army (The White Army) and the Bolsheviks (The Red Army).  Although it came into being near the end of the Victorian era, I believe it still counts (correct me if I'm wrong), so that makes TWO Steampunk weapons I own.
  Awesome sounding weapon.  I myself am fond of the Mare's Leg, and am saving to buy the one for sale in town.  My lady wants one also.  I dream of one day having a Damascus or, if I could find one, Wells Fargo Shotgun to keep over the hearth mantle.
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« Reply #415 on: February 15, 2012, 05:23:02 am »

Quote
I myself am fond of the Mare's Leg, and am saving to buy the one for sale in town.

Me too, I want to order one from Rossi in .44 cal to match by .44 revolvers.
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Xenos
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« Reply #416 on: February 15, 2012, 05:58:02 am »

Quote
I myself am fond of the Mare's Leg, and am saving to buy the one for sale in town.

Me too, I want to order one from Rossi in .44 cal to match by .44 revolvers.


I shall third this-were I to get one, it would probably match whatever revolvers I end up getting (I've not really heard anything good about the .45LC Open Tops, what with the cracking of the forcing cones 'nall, so I think I'd probably go with .44 as well...)
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« Reply #417 on: February 15, 2012, 06:19:35 am »

I dream of one day having a Damascus or, if I could find one, Wells Fargo Shotgun to keep over the hearth mantle.

*wipes a tear*  When I worked for an auction company awhile back we had a gorgeous Victorian era shotgun come in for a gun sale.  It was a double-barrel break-open in a pistol format.  Great engraving work, amazing colors in the wood, and a Damascus barrel.  All sorts of collectors were just in awe at this gun.  Well somebody who probably had a grudge decided to notify the ATF.  Apparently, despite the age, and despite the fact that a modern shell would not work in it, it was still illegal because whoever bought it never filled out the papers to have it grandfathered in when the laws changed in the 1930's. It probably sat on a mantel or in a box in an attic for 100 years only to be melted down. 
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greatestescaper
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« Reply #418 on: February 15, 2012, 04:37:05 pm »

NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!
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KABAR2
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« Reply #419 on: February 15, 2012, 05:56:41 pm »

I dream of one day having a Damascus or, if I could find one, Wells Fargo Shotgun to keep over the hearth mantle.

*wipes a tear*  When I worked for an auction company awhile back we had a gorgeous Victorian era shotgun come in for a gun sale.  It was a double-barrel break-open in a pistol format.  Great engraving work, amazing colors in the wood, and a Damascus barrel.  All sorts of collectors were just in awe at this gun.  Well somebody who probably had a grudge decided to notify the ATF.  Apparently, despite the age, and despite the fact that a modern shell would not work in it, it was still illegal because whoever bought it never filled out the papers to have it grandfathered in when the laws changed in the 1930's. It probably sat on a mantel or in a box in an attic for 100 years only to be melted down. 

If the gun was made before 1898 it did not have to be registered it was grandfathered by the fact that it was made before what is considered a modern firearm.... I own a Beretta M1918/30 it is a short barreled semiauto 9mm carbine a grandson of the Villia perosa WWI Smg. because of it's age and collectability it was grandfathered by ATFE. no registration required... of course who is going to rob a liquor store with a $2000.00+ gun? this was more a case of the local ATFE agent not knowing the law or just wanting to add something neat to the collection.
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Tower
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« Reply #420 on: February 15, 2012, 06:46:17 pm »

Quote
If the gun was made before 1898 it did not have to be registered it was grandfathered by the fact that it was made before what is considered a modern firearm.... I own a Beretta M1918/30 it is a short barreled semiauto 9mm carbine a grandson of the Villia perosa WWI Smg. because of it's age and collectability it was grandfathered by ATFE. no registration required... of course who is going to rob a liquor store with a $2000.00+ gun? this was more a case of the local ATFE agent not knowing the law or just wanting to add something neat to the collection.


I was thinking the same thing.   There is also an exemption for guns unlikely to be used offensively and for ones for historical, cultural and novelty use. This is what I use to theoretically make my homebuilt .81 caliber handcannon legal.

I don't have Title 18 in front of my right now but I suspect that this shotgun pistol was perfectly legal to own but probably not to sell, a lot of gun related things fall in that category.

But like most laws, its perfectly legal until someone complains.
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greatestescaper
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« Reply #421 on: February 15, 2012, 06:54:18 pm »

My cousin had a similar experience with a knife.  He's from the midWest where it is perfectly legal to carry a knife of certain size.  Well really it's legal across the nation, however in certain areas it's frowned upon.  He was getting ready to enter the Statue of Liberty, they demanded he turn over his knife, not to be returned afterwards.  Only now, several years later are they finally reconsidering the ban.  It's preposterous that they can ban a perfectly legal item to carry and not return it to you.  Apparently even when within our rights and following laws it is up to the person you are dealing with at the moment how the law in interpreted.  Even when that law is crystal clear...
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Darkhound
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« Reply #422 on: February 15, 2012, 09:59:12 pm »

There was a sad case in England a few years back. Some yob stole a 20,000 plus pounds Purdey sidelock double shotgun and chopped the barrels down to 12" to rob a shop of 17.50.
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KABAR2
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« Reply #423 on: February 15, 2012, 10:37:42 pm »

There was a sad case in England a few years back. Some yob stole a 20,000 plus pounds Purdey sidelock double shotgun and chopped the barrels down to 12" to rob a shop of 17.50.

There was a case like that in Canada also, a fellow robbed a bank and was caught and imprissoned.....
his take in the robbery was something like 3000.00 dollars.... the gun used in the commission of the robbery a rare 1911 (Colt/Browning design) manufactured by a contractor.... they only made a few the guns value at the time of the robbery....... 100,000.00........
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D.Oakes
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« Reply #424 on: February 16, 2012, 12:32:02 am »

I dream of one day having a Damascus or, if I could find one, Wells Fargo Shotgun to keep over the hearth mantle.

*wipes a tear*  When I worked for an auction company awhile back we had a gorgeous Victorian era shotgun come in for a gun sale.  It was a double-barrel break-open in a pistol format.  Great engraving work, amazing colors in the wood, and a Damascus barrel.  All sorts of collectors were just in awe at this gun.  Well somebody who probably had a grudge decided to notify the ATF.  Apparently, despite the age, and despite the fact that a modern shell would not work in it, it was still illegal because whoever bought it never filled out the papers to have it grandfathered in when the laws changed in the 1930's. It probably sat on a mantel or in a box in an attic for 100 years only to be melted down.  

If the gun was made before 1898 it did not have to be registered it was grandfathered by the fact that it was made before what is considered a modern firearm.... I own a Beretta M1918/30 it is a short barreled semiauto 9mm carbine a grandson of the Villia perosa WWI Smg. because of it's age and collectability it was grandfathered by ATFE. no registration required... of course who is going to rob a liquor store with a $2000.00+ gun? this was more a case of the local ATFE agent not knowing the law or just wanting to add something neat to the collection.

It may have been immediately post-1898, but I suspect the last part.  Many people don't consider the Damascus barrel to be even relevant as far as use goes due to the fragile nature.  
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