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Author Topic: Non-steamed steampunk guns  (Read 300983 times)
maze.rodent
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United States United States


« on: June 11, 2009, 07:43:26 pm »

pretty simple, what is your favorite actual gun from history that has that steamy flare to it?

most of mine can be had in replica through Pedersoli
examples:
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Agamemnon Magillicutty
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United States United States



« Reply #1 on: June 11, 2009, 08:18:26 pm »

I love the classic lines of the Scofield Revolver, the ejector action especially.

I'm also quite partial to the Colt Walker.

also, you don't get more classic than a classic Improved Model Henry Rifle. Instantly recognizable, but timelessly classic.
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« Reply #2 on: June 11, 2009, 08:18:55 pm »

Any musket or shotgun that has over 5 barrels Cheesy
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Dax
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« Reply #3 on: June 12, 2009, 02:02:03 am »

The Whitworth rifle, with hexagonagle rifling and bullet.

The Sharps .50 rifle.

And, of course, the Gatling gun.
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Kogwheal
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« Reply #4 on: June 12, 2009, 02:17:14 am »

The "broomhandle" Mauser C96 gets my vote, no question.  As far as I know (could very well be wrong), it was the first reliable semiautomatic pistol, and was first produced in 1896.  It's also got that menacing clunkiness about it that I just love.  (And steampunk aside, Han Solo carried the "galaxy far, far away" model, so its reliability and awesomeness are beyond question).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mauser_C96 

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Agamemnon Magillicutty
Officer
***
United States United States



« Reply #5 on: June 12, 2009, 03:12:48 am »

Ahh yes, how I forgot the Mauser.

a pistol of such inelegant beauty. I once had the opportunity to purchase a mint vintage one (never handled, never fired) but did not have a thousand dollars with which to even make an offer.

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maze.rodent
Gunner
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United States United States


« Reply #6 on: June 12, 2009, 05:37:43 am »

the c96 is, without a doubt, one of my favorite guns.  if you like "clunky", the chinese made a massive .45 ACP version.  apparently of surprisingly good quality.  also, i love the machine pistol versions.  even more steam-ish with a 20-rd detachable mag.  hell, i even like the freakish spanish versions (google image search MM-34, there's even a 50-round prototype magazine).

also, in the "wierd" category, along with the hexagonal bullets, there was a Kentucky rifle i saw with a square bore!
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Captain Lyerly
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At the helm of the Frumious Bandersnatch


« Reply #7 on: June 12, 2009, 01:53:54 pm »

Long gun?

Winchester 1873 lever-action rifled musket, .44-40  Uberti promised a reproduction, but hasn't followed through.



Mine has the bayonet, though, like this one:



Pistol?  Perhaps the Borchardt.



Pocket pistol - definitely the "Apache" folding pistol - with bayonet, and can be used as a set of brass knuckles.




Cheers!


Chas.
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maze.rodent
Gunner
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United States United States


« Reply #8 on: June 12, 2009, 08:19:04 pm »

i also love the 1895 winchester russian contract musket, it has a sword bayonet!

http://photos.imageevent.com/willyp/russiansovietcomblocsection/russia/weapons/1895winchesterm1916/1895RbayOn.jpg

and i do like the apache, but if it had maybe a 2-inch barrel or something, it could fire from more than point blank.

the luger and broomhandle carbines are very nice, too.

http://www.thefirearmblog.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2008/02/auctions-233-images-org-33102.jpg

http://www.1896mauser.com/flatsidecarbine.jpg

how bout the gabbet-fairfax mars pistol?

http://www.horstheld.com/Mars-47.jpg
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Captain Blackstone
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« Reply #9 on: June 12, 2009, 08:33:40 pm »

I have found myself lately enamored of the Martini Henry Howdah pistol.
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Captain Lyerly
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« Reply #10 on: June 13, 2009, 02:22:40 am »

I had heard of the Martini converted to pistol.  It would have to be a bit lighter cartridge than the standard.  Very nice.

The Mars always looked a bit crudely finished, to me.  But I seem to recall that, for a long time, it was the most powerful handgun available.


Cheers!

Chas.
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The_Steam_Master
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« Reply #11 on: June 13, 2009, 02:02:49 pm »

it would have to be the Navy Colt 1851



simple, effective, beautiful
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Pheobsky
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« Reply #12 on: June 13, 2009, 02:52:32 pm »

I'd just like to make a note for newer posters that there's a ban on discussion of post 1914 firearms.
There're no problems so far, but I mention it as it's a fairly logical progression unless you know the rules Wink
Quote
Modern Firearms:
     Banned discussion includes: Real weapons created after 1914 (the start of WWI).
It does not include: Plastic toy guns that have been modified to look 'Steampunk', water pistols, or nerf weapons also Steampunk-modified or pre-1914 themed. Specifically, if the item in question is not either a piece of historical interest to Steampunk fans (generally anything before 1914), or an obviously replica/prop piece that has Steampunk aspects to it, then it should not be discussed here.  I want to make it clear that both 'pro-gun' and 'anti-gun' discussions are unwelcome, as both dealing with Modern Firearms and being Political in nature.
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Agamemnon Magillicutty
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« Reply #13 on: June 13, 2009, 04:22:26 pm »

it would have to be the Navy Colt 1851



simple, effective, beautiful


I have a replica, and a real one sitting on my nightstand.
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The_Steam_Master
Guest
« Reply #14 on: June 13, 2009, 04:54:35 pm »

it would have to be the Navy Colt 1851

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

simple, effective, beautiful


I have a replica, and a real one sitting on my nightstand.


ive got the replica, i used to have it around with me alot, i got real good with spinning it and everything, but thats going off topic
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Agamemnon Magillicutty
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United States United States



« Reply #15 on: June 13, 2009, 05:45:26 pm »

it's just a beautiful gun.

I thought you couldn't own a functioning firearm in GB?

not trying to get political, but was your replica a non-firing version?
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Captain Lyerly
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« Reply #16 on: June 13, 2009, 06:09:41 pm »

Thanks for the reminder, Phe.  It is awful easy to stray off topic here, but it is also nice to note that there are plenty of steamy firearms, and the ones made prior to 1914 of course tend more towards steamitude. 

One of the most attractive features of this forum is that ban on political discussion - one can find a forum out there to support, reject, or debate any political subject you want - even a steampunk one.  Here, we can breathe easier, my blood pressure is lower, and the level and tone of the discourse are superior to anywhere on the net that I have yet found.

As far as steamy goes, brass-framed guns, in many ways, are "the bomb" as it were.



Okay, the frame isn't *all* brass, but I still want one.  Trying to figure out how to make a Nordenfelt potato cannon next.


Cheers!

Chas.
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The_Steam_Master
Guest
« Reply #17 on: June 13, 2009, 06:11:38 pm »

it's just a beautiful gun.

I thought you couldn't own a functioning firearm in GB?

not trying to get political, but was your replica a non-firing version?

its a non-firing, but fully 'functional' Denix replica
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Sir Nikolas Vendigroth
Captain Spice
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« Reply #18 on: June 13, 2009, 06:46:14 pm »

it's just a beautiful gun.

I thought you couldn't own a functioning firearm in GB?

not trying to get political, but was your replica a non-firing version?

Without going too far in the wrong direction, I'll say it's perfectly legal to own any non-banned firearm in the UK, as long as you've got the appropriate paperwork, either a firearm certificate or a shotgun certificate.
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Agamemnon Magillicutty
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« Reply #19 on: June 14, 2009, 03:44:51 am »

Just a little outside the era, but I think the Thompson Submachine Gun should be grandfathered in.

it's just got classic lines, and looks great.
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Agamemnon Magillicutty
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United States United States



« Reply #20 on: June 14, 2009, 03:46:33 am »

it's just a beautiful gun.

I thought you couldn't own a functioning firearm in GB?

not trying to get political, but was your replica a non-firing version?

its a non-firing, but fully 'functional' Denix replica

Gotcha, my 'replica' is a Thompson Center replica Colt Navy, that still functions as a real firearm (the only reason it's a replica is that it's not made by Colt).

they are gorgeous guns.
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Sgt.Major Thistlewaite
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« Reply #21 on: June 14, 2009, 04:21:38 am »

Just a little outside the era, but I think the Thompson Submachine Gun should be grandfathered in.

it's just got classic lines, and looks great.
Actually outside the "1914" rule by a mere whisker, as it is based on the friction lock principle for which John Bell Blish was issued a patent in 1915. This pre-supposes that the idea for it was probably pre-1914, but I don't want to split hairs. The actual firearm did not go into production until 1919. I'm a big fan of this gun, also. I'll add that I own, or have owned at some point, almost all the guns discussed in this thread so far...real ones. Many others as well..I am an avid collector. I have no use for non-working reproductions, and I truly despise Nerf guns.
Personal preference, not judging anyone else's taste.

Thistlewaite

Edit: Addendum; I'll add that it seems many people think that a gun has to be a caplock, flintlock or some such to "qualify" under the BG guidelines. Not so. Case in point- the 1911 Colt .45 automatic, Browning's patent. Kind of makes the "modern firearms" rule moot,... or perhaps it is the exception that proves the rule...it was made before 1914, but is the basis for almost all subsequent semi-automatic pistols, and is of a design so robust and reliable that they are still manufactured today...I just bought one brand new two weeks ago... Undecided
« Last Edit: June 14, 2009, 05:15:35 am by Sgt.Major Thistlewaite » Logged

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Agamemnon Magillicutty
Officer
***
United States United States



« Reply #22 on: June 14, 2009, 05:55:31 am »

Hmm, never thought about it, but the 1911 is a fine example of a timeless gun.

as for 'non working replicas' I too see no point in them, especially considering that the price of some of them is comparable to that of a working model.

however, if I'm working on a prop, and I just want it for show, or to modify heavily, then I'll happily take the cheap replica over the real deal.

I don't despise Nerf Guns, but they're not for my Steampunk persona, and if anybody in my group were to bring one, even heavily modified, I would encourage them to replace it with a better piece at their earliest convenience.
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quantumcat
Zeppelin Captain
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United States United States


« Reply #23 on: June 14, 2009, 07:06:10 am »

Nerf guns are a fun 'entry' piece.

Replicas of any type could be useful in inspiring interest in the genuine article without risking damage to an authentic piece
or incurring the expense of owning such an item.

I have prints of fine artwork,digital copies of old music that I play plus textiles,lamps,tableware and furniture that duplicate
items I could never own or would not endanger around pets,children or mad tinkerers.

It can seem sad to isolate good artistry and materials but, if they can be hazardous,have great value (sentimental or monetary) or be easily lost or hurt,then I think it wiser to limit exposure to the real thing (or real bling!) and evoke their virtues with lesser clones.

(Not to mention but if some miscreant were to make off with my ordnance,I'd prefer they steal a fake or foam weapon and leave me with the finer bits safely cached.

Like Dr. Watson,I keep a bull pup-but I prefer to face danger with a cool head and our "Molly" loaded with table salt.)
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Agamemnon Magillicutty
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United States United States



« Reply #24 on: June 14, 2009, 07:40:08 am »

Nerf guns are a fun 'entry' piece.

Replicas of any type could be useful in inspiring interest in the genuine article without risking damage to an authentic piece
or incurring the expense of owning such an item.

I have prints of fine artwork,digital copies of old music that I play plus textiles,lamps,tableware and furniture that duplicate
items I could never own or would not endanger around pets,children or mad tinkerers.

It can seem sad to isolate good artistry and materials but, if they can be hazardous,have great value (sentimental or monetary) or be easily lost or hurt,then I think it wiser to limit exposure to the real thing (or real bling!) and evoke their virtues with lesser clones.

(Not to mention but if some miscreant were to make off with my ordnance,I'd prefer they steal a fake or foam weapon and leave me with the finer bits safely cached.

Like Dr. Watson,I keep a bull pup-but I prefer to face danger with a cool head and our "Molly" loaded with table salt.)


don't mistake my non-use of Nerf or non-firing replicas as a complete disregard for them, or their place in our subculture. I know full well that functioning firearms are verboten in many countries, and therefore, only non-firing replicas are available, and I am very understanding and accepting of that fact. But for me, outside of creating or modding a weapon that does not exist, I have no use for them.

as for Nerf, well, no amount of modding, or repainting can make it not look like Nerf. When I've got a gun that looks just like a thousand other guns, I just don't see the point.

not that I have a problem with those using them, but I would encourage a little creativity in the creation of one's armory.

as for theft, well, a one-of-a-kind item is far more identifiable than one that looks like everything else, but then, one has to catch the suspect first...

and I really guess I'm the type who believes in the good in everybody. While I know there are thieves out there, I'd like to think that most people are courteous enough to look, and appreciate, without being so low as to steal. I know that's not true, but I still like to hope.
« Last Edit: June 14, 2009, 07:43:12 am by Agamemnon Magillicutty » Logged
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