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Author Topic: how to age metal?  (Read 24037 times)
Captaen Victor Greywind
Deck Hand
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United Kingdom United Kingdom


Captaen of the Hollow Wind


« Reply #50 on: August 02, 2009, 03:43:06 am »

My favourite method of making metal look antiqued is quite interesting indeed.

Start off by making yourself a nice pot of hot coffee, from ground coffee. Now, drink all of that coffee, it will give you energy.

The first REAL step is to soak the metal overnight in USED coffee grounds, hence the real reason you should make a pot of coffee. The grounds should be damp, but not soaking wet/submerged.

 After you have done this, stab the metal into a fresh potato. Yes, I'm aware of how ridiculous that sounds, but it is quite true. Leave the metal inside the potato for about a half hour.

Remove the metal and rinse it off, it should have gained a thuroughly older appearance. This works especially well on knives.
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JingleJoe
Zeppelin Overlord
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United Kingdom United Kingdom


The Green Dungeon Alchemist


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« Reply #51 on: August 02, 2009, 04:35:13 am »

Unfortunately for that method lots of metal doesn't fit inside potatos Roll Eyes
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Providing weird sound contraptions and time machines since 2064.
MWBailey
Rogue Ætherlord
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United States United States


"This is the sort of thing no-one ever believes"

rtafStElmo
« Reply #52 on: August 02, 2009, 05:07:47 am »

Unfortunately for that method lots of metal doesn't fit inside potatos Roll Eyes
You have to get Texas potatoes, Joe. Just be warned, however, that you should never expect to buy only 200 lb.s of potatoes, because in supermarkets here in Texas, we don't cut a potato in half fer nobody! Wink
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Walk softly and carry a big banjo...

""quid statis aspicientes in infernum"
Rimbaum
Gunner
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United States United States

rimbaum
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« Reply #53 on: August 02, 2009, 06:11:56 am »

A question on copper leaf and aging it:

I'm working on a project where I'm going to put some copper leaf over a wooden surface. I don't want the bright, shiny look of new copper, but I also don't want it brushing off when I try to age it. It's also a relatively small portion of a very large item, so enclosing it in a plastic box is going to be unfeasible (and probably bad for the paint on the rest of the item). So I'm wondering if there's any way to age copper leafing without getting it brushed off or requiring an enclosed space?
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Miss Groves
Zeppelin Captain
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United Kingdom United Kingdom


running out of steam


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« Reply #54 on: August 02, 2009, 01:34:02 pm »

i'd probably go for acrylic paint on something that delicate.
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greensteam
Zeppelin Captain
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United Kingdom United Kingdom


Steamed up from birth


« Reply #55 on: August 05, 2009, 01:03:34 am »

Salty water is always the best to get things corroding.
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