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Author Topic: Victorian and Steampunk Crossdressing  (Read 52681 times)
angeluk
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« Reply #50 on: May 10, 2009, 07:03:21 pm »

Thanks for the compliment. I'm a bit envious of your dressmaking skills, so I guess we're even :-)

Pockets are very important, and luckily enough the skirt I wore for my other (so far) steamy outfit (which my pictures from Eastercon really doesn't show very well) has pockets, and they make life so much simpler than needing a bag for those all important things like keys, money, multitool...
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Victorian Anachronist
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« Reply #51 on: May 12, 2009, 06:25:08 am »

I think I'm going to put pockets in every dress I make from now on, even ball gowns--you never know when you'll need one.

Tonight I finished another thift-store bedsheet petticoat that had been laying around, waiting for a waistband (Sorry for the poor image quality; I had to take them myself with the camera's timer.):

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

It's technically for use over a large bustle, hence the extra length in the back. But I shortened it so I can wear it for both a bustled 1870s dress or a non-bustled 1890s dress, without fear of the back being too long and dragging on the ground.

What I love about this petticoat is that the colours are historically accurate--for day wear it was almost required that you have patterned or coloured petticoats, since they wouldn't show dirt and dust as easily as white ones, which were usually reserved for evening wear until about 1900. Then white petticoats became the norm for all times of day.

Here's a period 1890s department store catalog page....have fun looking.  Smiley
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Prof. Grendel Footman Esq
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« Reply #52 on: May 12, 2009, 07:15:04 am »

I've seen worse at all the anime and sci-fi con's I go to.  even a witch hunter robin at ;ast year's anime boston, that it took a good 10 minutes to even realize it was a man, then again I've also been blinded by a man-Cammy (street fighter2) complete with thong, normally i'd say each to their own but the man-cammy still gives me nightmares
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Vienna Fahrmann
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« Reply #53 on: May 13, 2009, 09:14:25 pm »


    Dear Victorian Anachronist,

    What style of bustle pad are you using?  Mine is one of those calf length half circle boned styles, but is not too good for packing.  Is your bustle pad a small one? I'm considering making one for travel.

     Vienna
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Victorian Anachronist
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« Reply #54 on: May 14, 2009, 05:06:16 am »

Hello Vienna,

Yes, the bustle I'm wearing is a simple half-moon shaped pad, stuffed with bamboo fiberfill. Unfortunately I should have used more stuffing; it has compressed a bit with wear.
Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Since it's so small and easily compressed, it's not really useful for 1870s or 1880s bustle dresses. I use it to round out my derriere for my green 1890s dress; it gives a more feminine as well as period appearance to my overall silhouette. Plus it helps the pleated peplum on the bodice lay properly.

I only know of one "travelling bustle" pattern; from the website's photo it doesn't look like it would be very effective at all:



http://www.mantua-maker.com/catalog.html

At my workplace (the sewing department of a historical museum/village) the most common bustle is a pad type, but with several pads stacked on top of each other, with the largest on the bottom. But that would take up even more space than a wire bustle in luggage, and would be hard to sit comfortably in for long periods. Not to mention the added weight.... Shocked back pain would be probable.

This is the pattern I used for the elliptical hoop; a small wire bustle pattern is included. I might try it sometime; it would probably be easier to travel with than the longer bustles.

http://farthingales.on.ca/laughing_moon_112.php

Which pattern did you use for the bustle you currently have, or did you have it made for you by someone else? I'm curious.

« Last Edit: May 14, 2009, 05:14:02 am by Victorian Anachronist » Logged
Professor Maelstromme
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« Reply #55 on: May 16, 2009, 08:33:11 am »

Wonderful sewing, love the style and color  Smiley
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« Reply #56 on: May 17, 2009, 12:50:38 am »

     You look lovely in that dress and I applaud your remarkable ability with a sewing machine. (I, however, am not jealous. Probably due to my hatred of sewing that burns with an intensity rivaling that of a thousand suns...)

Re: The ladies who wish to dress as gentlemen but believe that they posses too girlish of figures to do so.
     There are many ways to hide that. Men's clothing styles, older fashions especially, are quite forgiving of curves and do much to hide them. A long coat, preferably extending below the hips so as not to draw attention to them, will also mask curves. The multiple layers often employed help mask a smaller bust and, if it is quite noticeable still and it bothers you, you could always employ binding to achieve a more masculine figure.
     A good resource would be looking at 'passing tips' for female to male transsexuals.
May I recommend the following: (put under a spoiler due to adult contents)
     Lastly, I believe Her Majesty's coat contributes largely to her look. You'll notice that the long coat she wears in each picture effectively hides the sides of her body, thereby diminishing the presence of curves, hips, and other giveaways.
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Vienna Fahrmann
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« Reply #57 on: May 17, 2009, 04:16:17 am »


    Dear Victorian Anachronist,

    I made my bustle in a one-day "make a bustle" workshop from the instructors pattern.  It works well, it just doesn't pack down very small.  Unlike our Victorian ancestors, I prefer to travel lightly.

     Vienna
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Lucifargundam
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« Reply #58 on: May 17, 2009, 06:35:37 am »

It makes me feel better to know that other people other than me can/have sewn their own clothes... I just lack teh requirements needed to make good looking boots @_@ teh hardest part is the sole/rubber.

Maybe we should setup a workshop on how to make boots?
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Mina
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« Reply #59 on: May 24, 2009, 02:41:36 am »

Victorian Anachronist, I have to say that when I first opened up this thread I initially did believe that you were in fact a girl. Great job with that Smiley

I only wish I could cross dress succesfully, though I can't say I've tried. A lot of really hot guys I know are gay (ya know, all the good guys are either gay or taken, too bad for us ladies), and I've always enjoyed reading the kind of stories where a teen girl (from times long ago) achieved her dream of becoming a soldier or a knight or a player by posing as a boy. My figure isn't horribly feminine (though it still is), but my face seems to be extremely feminine.

But good job to you, and I do rather admire your bustle.
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angeluk
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« Reply #60 on: May 24, 2009, 11:25:26 am »

all the good guys are either gay or taken

That all depends on your definitions (of most of the words in the sentence :-)

Trying to stay on topic, I'm currently planning outfits for The Asylum, and wondering where I'm going to get sewing time from.
Knowing me, there will be pictures, if anybody's interested.
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JennyWren
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« Reply #61 on: May 24, 2009, 12:43:41 pm »

hi there,how in hens teeth did imiss this post,oh well,


love your outfits, and love the fact you make them yoiur self..


Always dress a bit tom boyish, even since i went 24/7

ya know, all the good guys are either gay or taken
you need to be quicker next time
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PhylNotCharles
« Reply #62 on: June 01, 2009, 07:51:56 pm »

I have to admit I was sceptical to begin with. My first though was, "I think this lady may not fully understand the meaning of the word "cross-dressing". Bravo! *applause*
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« Reply #63 on: June 01, 2009, 11:46:58 pm »

Victorian Anachronist, that is some amazing cross-dressing! It took me a minute of staring at your face to realize that you were male. That gold elliptical skirt is gorgeous, by the way.

This thread makes me want to return to an old fun idea that's been bouncing around my head, which is playing around with androgyny rather than full-on crossdressing. A men's victorian suit tailored to fit the corseted female form, for example. Obviously it's been done before, but it would flatter my rather broad shoulders...
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« Reply #64 on: June 04, 2009, 02:52:30 am »

*gasp*I missed this?
Anachronist,you look spectacular dear!I wish I looked half as good in such beautiful things.
 
 I suppose I fall into this category.I'm very fond of male fashions of the age-fine waistcoats,tail-coats...
Generally go mostly for a sort of young-ish boy,scruffy look.
I love even more to mix male and female.A nice waistcoat and fairly masculine boots with a skirt and girly blouse.
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« Reply #65 on: June 04, 2009, 06:43:28 pm »

Ooooh, I love this thread! The photographs are excellent, everyone; nice work, and great outfits!

Mina: To create a more masculine face, there are a number of methods you can use. I usually apply dental wax to the outsides of my bottom molars, creating a broader jaw line, and use just a tiny bit of dark brown eye shadow to make a sharper gonial angle (the place where your jaw changes direction just in front of your ear). It's also amazing how thickening and darkening your brows with eyeliner pencil can have a profound effect on your look.
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Vienna Fahrmann
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« Reply #66 on: June 04, 2009, 09:00:23 pm »


    Dear Victorian Anachronist,

    Have you seen the book by Frances Grimble "Reconstruction Fashions 1868-?"  (Sorry, I don't remember the last date, but it's early 1870's).  They have a number of small bustle patterns in there.  I'm thinking of trying one as a travelling bustle.

     Vienna

    PS-The book is a large collection of original source patterns for almost every type of women's garment form the late 1860's-early 1870's.
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fireheart storm
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« Reply #67 on: June 04, 2009, 10:08:57 pm »

Ah, cross dressing.  What gives me away most of the time is my large rear and large hips  Cry
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Victorian Anachronist
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« Reply #68 on: June 12, 2009, 12:49:09 am »

Thank for the compliments!  Cheesy

Vienna, I haven't read that book yet, although I would like to acquire it someday. For now I just use Truly Victorian patterns, and frankly, I don't want to ever go back to commercial patterns. For one, her sizing method means bodices actually fit correctly, usually on the first try. And all the patterns are printed on heavy white paper, not tissue paper--I can trace them out and resize them as many times as I need to, with no destruction of the original pattern pieces. I always accidentally tear my tissue paper patterns and end up being very angry....which means I don't enjoy the assembly process like I normally do.

I've drafted an 1895 skirt from a period tailoring guide, that was interesting. It ended up being 18 feet at the hem and lovely, but I need to remake the pockets and put a wider waistband on it before I can wear it properly. And thanks to the Threadbanger how-to, I draped a spat pattern off my boots...but the pair isn't complete, so not photos yet. I have a commission petticoat that needs finishing, anyway.

Thanks again everyone!
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leeps
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« Reply #69 on: June 12, 2009, 01:02:02 am »

Wow, I have to say the clothes you make look really great. I'm lazy and have no sewing skills, so I can only dream of being able to make such things. It is a remarkable skill you have there.
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Prof Eumides Blakehurst
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« Reply #70 on: June 12, 2009, 05:13:32 am »

And all the patterns are printed on heavy white paper, not tissue paper--I can trace them out and resize them as many times as I need to, with no destruction of the original pattern pieces. I always accidentally tear my tissue paper patterns and end up being very angry....which means I don't enjoy the assembly process like I normally do.

If I get a pattern on tissue, the first thing I do is iron the entire sheets onto fusible interfacing, then cut them out. Otherwise I'm very prone to tearing the things!
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Miss Evangeline Tea
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« Reply #71 on: June 12, 2009, 06:11:22 am »

Sorry. Would it help if I pointed out that I was tired when writing that and failed to think of a better word for it, especially since my costuming roots lie in anime cosplay?



Although, I have met some people who do consider their steampunk costumes "cosplay"....


Really, we're all going out in costumes and having fun, why be elitist about the terminology? I mean, I'm sorry that I offended you, but I'm not sure what exactly was so offensive about the word "cosplay." That is to say, "costume-play" sounds like having fun while wearing a costume to me. Is this not the case?

 I believe that the issue come from the fact that some folk choose to view  steam punk as  lifestyle rather than a fashion choice. Something very similar happened on another thread, where in a Gentleman from the 501st made a similar comment.  I think both views are equally valid. 
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Victorian Anachronist
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« Reply #72 on: June 12, 2009, 05:13:31 pm »

I believe that the issue come from the fact that some folk choose to view  steam punk as  lifestyle rather than a fashion choice. Something very similar happened on another thread, where in a Gentleman from the 501st made a similar comment.  I think both views are equally valid.

I agree wholeheartedly, Miss Tea.  Smiley

Sorry. Would it help if I pointed out that I was tired when writing that and failed to think of a better word for it, especially since my costuming roots lie in anime cosplay?



Although, I have met some people who do consider their steampunk costumes "cosplay"....


Really, we're all going out in costumes and having fun, why be elitist about the terminology? I mean, I'm sorry that I offended you, but I'm not sure what exactly was so offensive about the word "cosplay." That is to say, "costume-play" sounds like having fun while wearing a costume to me. Is this not the case?

I would like to point out that "cosplay" is actually a combination of the words "costume roleplay", not "costume play". In essence, you are not only dressing up as but also taking on the persona of the character you're portraying. So if you have created an original character (using a Steampunk name, profession, etc.) and dress up and act as them, you are cosplaying, technically. Those people who dress up "as themselves" with no character or reference in mind wouldn't be cosplaying, then. It's confusing, to say the least, even to regular cosplayers.

If I get a pattern on tissue, the first thing I do is iron the entire sheets onto fusible interfacing, then cut them out. Otherwise I'm very prone to tearing the things!

I have thought about doing that, as well. My other issue is that the patterns are scrunched and folded weird in the envelope, and hard to flatten by themselves with the iron (without scorching them, at least for me). But I will definitely remember that next time I need to use a commercial pattern, thanks.
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« Reply #73 on: June 12, 2009, 06:27:08 pm »

Anachronist, you obviously have a great abundance of patience. I've been sewing for a while, making mostly formal wear for high school events since I don't want to spend $100 on something that wouldn't be in my tastes, and NEVER have I attempted full Victorian dress for the mere fact that I despise gathering ruffles and working with too much fabric. Many kudos to you.

I've thought about simply dressing as a dandy, as I have no hips and no figure. My main dilemma is the very feminine voice (bordering on shrill, I've heard) and rather feminine face. I could pass off being a young boy, but I feel that I'll keep with my wrap-skirts and waistcoats, as I also find pants quite obnoxious.
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« Reply #74 on: June 12, 2009, 08:51:54 pm »

How nice to see you posting here , I saw your posts over on the Belles site a while back & was so impressed with your patience & skill at fitting that wonderful dress .

Bravo !

There is also this you may be interested in , as well as any others here that sew , as there is an International catagory -

There is an online costume contest for Victorian bustle era dresses and they have included a Steampunk catagory !  So far I am the only entry , so I assume it is because not enough people have heard , since there is no shortage of great , creative costumers out there in this hobby . Here is the info :

http://www.bustledress.com/cgi-bin/z.pl/reset/article.contest.20090515-01.html

Take a look & maybe send in an entry !  There are many other catagories as well .


Arlene / widowsweeds
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