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Author Topic: A steam punk dictionary/lexicon  (Read 97479 times)
Darkhound
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« Reply #75 on: October 31, 2010, 02:42:47 am »

Without detracting in any way from the peculiar experiences of Mr. D. D. Home, might I suggest 'Blavatsky', after Madame Blavatsky, rather then 'Homey".  Although widely regarded as a fraud from 1875 to date, she was associated with ghostly phenomena her entire adult life, there aren't layers of competing meanings to plow through, and it makes a good mouth filling expletive when you feel exasperated!


Approving adjectives:

Steamy - worthy, attractive, in keeping with the Steampunk aesthetic.
Brassy - solid, reputable, well constructed.
Shiny - pretty, nicely finished.
Oiled - highly functional, running well.

Disapproving adjectives:

Tinny - opposite of brassy, as above.
Flashy - meretricious, having a fancy exterior but without real worth.
Gritty - opposite of oiled above.
















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SPBrewer
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« Reply #76 on: October 31, 2010, 03:44:20 am »

Without detracting in any way from the peculiar experiences of Mr. D. D. Home, might I suggest 'Blavatsky', after Madame Blavatsky, rather then 'Homey". 

Yes, you may.  But, only if I may suggest "than" rather than "then".  Smiley

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The Sky Pirate
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Darkhound
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« Reply #77 on: October 31, 2010, 05:04:34 am »

I never said I could type.
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Sgt. Glas
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« Reply #78 on: November 03, 2010, 02:50:13 pm »

I'm currently thinking of alternative steampunk transliterations for "nine", "pop a cap" and "hood".

I beleive that the Victorians had a term for "poping a cap", I do think it was to shoot, however for a more steampunk term it could be something more like "cute" as in electricute (please forgive any misspellings). As for "hood" that could just be home or hometown. I am not familiar with the rapper term "nine" so I can not provide any help with that one.
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Emperor Bob
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« Reply #79 on: November 04, 2010, 08:36:03 am »

I'm currently thinking of alternative steampunk transliterations for "nine", "pop a cap" and "hood".

I believe that the term "popping a cap" might actually be more relevant to Victorian shootings than modern ones, as some of those weapons were cap and ball, the cap being the bit that set off the powder. 
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Sgt. Glas
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« Reply #80 on: November 04, 2010, 12:35:01 pm »

I'm currently thinking of alternative steampunk transliterations for "nine", "pop a cap" and "hood".

I believe that the term "popping a cap" might actually be more relevant to Victorian shootings than modern ones, as some of those weapons were cap and ball, the cap being the bit that set off the powder. 

This is true, but perhaps "popping" the cap is not very Victorian. Perhaps more "blasting the cap" or "firing the cap". Also it may be perhaps good to come up with steampunk curse words on this string. After all the Victorians were a very reserved people, so the crass language of today would certinly be inappropriate to the ears. Except for saliors and Marines  Smiley.
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Wolvic Neostis
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« Reply #81 on: November 10, 2010, 08:45:11 pm »

I didn't read the thread completly, but has "Analytical machine" been mentioned?

Analytical machine, noun: computer, machine that can be programmed one way or another. Also known as Babbages analytical machine
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Emperor Bob
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« Reply #82 on: November 11, 2010, 07:20:13 am »

I didn't read the thread completly, but has "Analytical machine" been mentioned?

Analytical machine, noun: computer, machine that can be programmed one way or another. Also known as Babbages analytical machine

Well, I think it would be misleading to refer to a normal computer as a "Babbage," as that would refer more specifically to the difference or analytical engines that he designed, would it not?
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Mr Peter Harrow, Esq
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« Reply #83 on: November 11, 2010, 09:19:53 am »

"pop an ass into his cap" unpleasant Victorian schoolboy japery, as in "poor Tom, Flashman popped an ass in his cap and made him wear it, the blighter" (edited from original manuscript of Tom Brown's Schooldays)
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Athanor
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« Reply #84 on: November 12, 2010, 09:43:30 am »


Well, I think it would be misleading to refer to a normal computer as a "Babbage," as that would refer more specifically to the difference or analytical engines that he designed, would it not?

Perhaps we should call it an Electronick Analytick Calculating Engine.
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Prof_Von_Grumbleflick
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« Reply #85 on: November 19, 2010, 03:36:18 am »

I would like to submit:

Beckle: To argue about an imaginary, hypothetical or otherwise nonexistent machine, device or concept.
(Time machines, Lighter than water submarines, smoothly running Public Transport and 200 foot tall robots, for instance.)


Added to say that "Beckle", "Beckling", "beckles" are words that I (as far as I'm aware) are just words that I made up that sounded like they fit the meaning. If I've deeply insulted anyone in a language that I don't know, I'm sorry. Smiley
« Last Edit: November 21, 2010, 04:49:02 am by Prof_Von_Grumbleflick » Logged

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Emperor Bob
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« Reply #86 on: November 21, 2010, 12:50:26 am »

I would like to submit:

Beckle: To argue about an imaginary, hypothetical or otherwise nonexistent machine, device or concept.
(Time machines, Lighter than water submarines, smoothly running Public Transport and 200 foot tall robots, for instance.)


I like it! 
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Lilliput
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« Reply #87 on: November 21, 2010, 01:42:51 am »

Hmm, curses you say? I can only furnish you with the strange lexicon I know, most of which I have appropriated from elsewhere, and some of which I hope will be suitable for steampunk use.


Card (n)-  a fun guy to be around
Brick (n)- reliable, decent
Sound - good, solid, respectable, pleasant etc

Foxed, lambed, squiffy, bounced, sprocketed, steamed  - drunk

Corset - A pretty steampunkette (similar use to 'skirt' as in 'bit of corset')

To the aether - to bed

Damn your eyes/impudence! -an all round useful expression

And I just cannot get away from using the word 'cogling' inappropriately

So my handy steampunk phrase of the day:
A: That corset was a total card. Did you see her ogling my cogling?
B: You're steamed again. Better get you to the aether before you commit any more arson.
A: Damn your impudence, UNHAND ME
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Prof_Von_Grumbleflick
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« Reply #88 on: November 24, 2010, 01:29:56 am »

I'm sure this will cause a little debate, but I'd like to add:

Goggless - Goggle+less=goggless Non steampunk person.

Alternatively: Nogoggs or Whiteshirts

Someone must have a better suggestion, surely?
« Last Edit: November 24, 2010, 01:32:51 am by Prof_Von_Grumbleflick » Logged
Sgt. Glas
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« Reply #89 on: November 24, 2010, 01:30:21 pm »

I'm sure this will cause a little debate, but I'd like to add:

Goggless - Goggle+less=goggless Non steampunk person.

Alternatively: Nogoggs or Whiteshirts

Someone must have a better suggestion, surely?

Over here in the states we have a television seris called NCIS: Los Angeles, and in one of the episodes the characters were in a Steampunk bar when one gets kiddnapped. Well they asked the bar maid some questions and she called the non-Steampunks something. Unfortunatly I can't remember for the life of me.
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Wolvic Neostis
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« Reply #90 on: November 24, 2010, 01:49:34 pm »

I'm sure this will cause a little debate, but I'd like to add:

Goggless - Goggle+less=goggless Non steampunk person.

Alternatively: Nogoggs or Whiteshirts

Someone must have a better suggestion, surely?

What about a -hmm-  Embarrassed a brassless? (However, there is some adult-content related feeling with it)

We could also add "brassgoggler" : someone of the brassgoggles.co.uk forums Wink
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Mr Addams
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« Reply #91 on: November 24, 2010, 06:12:14 pm »


Over here in the states we have a television seris called NCIS: Los Angeles, and in one of the episodes the characters were in a Steampunk bar when one gets kiddnapped. Well they asked the bar maid some questions and she called the non-Steampunks something. Unfortunatly I can't remember for the life of me.

There has been much written elsewhere about the notorious NCIS: LA episode, but the barman referred to non steampunks as Muggles which was a not very imagenative steal from Harry Potter.
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Thermionic Drew
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« Reply #92 on: November 24, 2010, 09:29:51 pm »

Babbage (n)

syn Heath Robinson

Description (or object) which is highly complex (possibly needlessly).  Heath Robinson for objects only.

"I'm prone to ramble on, and it's a complex subject, so I expect I'll make a bit of a Babbage in explaining this, but..."

"Yes, it works, but it's a bit of a Heath Robinson."
« Last Edit: November 25, 2010, 09:27:41 pm by Thermionic Drew » Logged

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Sgt. Glas
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« Reply #93 on: November 25, 2010, 10:34:03 pm »

I'm sure this will cause a little debate, but I'd like to add:

Goggless - Goggle+less=goggless Non steampunk person.

Alternatively: Nogoggs or Whiteshirts

Someone must have a better suggestion, surely?

Perhaps Cogless, following the missing of necesary Steamy items. However if a TV show used a term then that is what most people think we use, possably from asking. I agree though we need a unified term for those outside of steampunk, and perhaps those who marry into it or are born of it (I beleive the latter has already been done).
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von Corax
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Prof. Darwin Prætorius von Corax


« Reply #94 on: November 27, 2010, 08:38:13 am »

I am a bit of a sprocket, and I apologize for reopening an old thread.

Not at all, my dear Sergeant — unlike most of the Ætherwebs, we consider the Dark Art of Thread Necromancy to be an entirely honourable practice. You will notice that none have so much as batted an eyelash to see this long-dead topic suddenly jolted back to life.

And earlier today I had a thought (dangerous, I know).  If a marine is a combatant who travels places on a waterborne craft, what would a combatant from an airship be called?  Now I don't mean standard ships security, I mean elite troopers used for boarding actions and establishing "land-heads".

Avian?

I am involed with United States Marine Reserve Officer Training (so excuse me if I speak navy) and seeing you all discussing what an airship marine shuld be called caught my eye. I just want to ask if the terms aboard an airship, like deck - floor or head - bathroom, have changed?

Most of the fitments retain their nautical namenclature, except when such nomenclature does not exist eg. "elevator" and "engine car", or when a more-descriptive alternative presents itself, as "gondola" for "deckhouse" or "envelope" for "hull."

If not why not just call us gyreines (us navy term of endearment for the Marines they serve with) the same thing no matter what kind of ship we serve aboard. Also if you do believe the Marines should be called Avians then may I suggest we think up a new term for saliors who also serve with the "Avians".

It seems obvious to me that where a wet-bottom would have Marines and Mariners, a sky-and-dry would have Avians and Aviators.

And on a different tack:
I didn't read the thread completly, but has "Analytical machine" been mentioned?

Analytical machine, noun: computer, machine that can be programmed one way or another. Also known as Babbages analytical machine

Well, I think it would be misleading to refer to a normal computer as a "Babbage," as that would refer more specifically to the difference or analytical engines that he designed, would it not?

Babbage's Analytical Engine, as has been discussed in other threads, is considered to be Turing-complete, meaning it can execute any and every algorithm which an electronic general-puropose computing engine can execute, so it would not be unreasonable for "babbage" to undergo genericide in the same way that "xerox" has done.
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Athanor
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« Reply #95 on: November 27, 2010, 10:30:03 am »

A couple of Steampunk-useful terms, in my experience of restricted geographical usage, but I may well be wrong there. 

"GIBBLED" is a useful word to desribe a piece of equipment that has reached the end of its useful life; one might thus describe a Phillips screwdrive whose tip is so badly worn that it slips out of the screw socket, causing you to smash your knuckles into an adjacent part of the machine, as "completely gibbled". It can also be used to refer to persons with a few logs short of a load. Never heard this word outside British Columbia, Canada, but I wouldn't be surprised if one or more of our members can provide me with other instances.

"KEGGLED" is another handy word meaning warped and twisted beyond all further usefulness; one might, for example, refer to a sheet of corrugated iron that had just been run over by a tractor-trailer rig as "terminally keggled". This word, as far as I know, is native to south and central Cheshire, England, but again may well occur elsewhere.

Language is fascinating. Some poet once referred to English word meanings as "fossilised poetry". A.E.Housmans? Dylan Thomas? - one of those guys.
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Sgt. Glas
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« Reply #96 on: November 28, 2010, 02:56:06 am »

And earlier today I had a thought (dangerous, I know).  If a marine is a combatant who travels places on a waterborne craft, what would a combatant from an airship be called?  Now I don't mean standard ships security, I mean elite troopers used for boarding actions and establishing "land-heads".

Avian?

I am involed with United States Marine Reserve Officer Training (so excuse me if I speak navy) and seeing you all discussing what an airship marine shuld be called caught my eye. I just want to ask if the terms aboard an airship, like deck - floor or head - bathroom, have changed?

Most of the fitments retain their nautical namenclature, except when such nomenclature does not exist eg. "elevator" and "engine car", or when a more-descriptive alternative presents itself, as "gondola" for "deckhouse" or "envelope" for "hull."

If not why not just call us gyreines (us navy term of endearment for the Marines they serve with) the same thing no matter what kind of ship we serve aboard. Also if you do believe the Marines should be called Avians then may I suggest we think up a new term for saliors who also serve with the "Avians".
.wet ottom would have Marines and Mariners, a sky-and-dry would have Avians and Aviators.
[?quote]

I mean no offence to Von Corax however this sounds like a descusion that may have happened we the armies of the world created (and this may only be over here) the air corps. If I am no mistaken at least in the United states army air corps they were still called soldiers. It was not until the seperate Air force was created that the term airman came into exsistince (pardon spelling). I feel this would stand true for an aero corps of the navy.
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Antipodean
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New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #97 on: November 28, 2010, 04:33:43 am »

The dialect in Britain can be completely different from one village to the next, even though the villages are within sight of each other. This also applies to district boundaries. I had always struggled with the meanings of Borrowed and Loaned. It was not until many years later I read a book on Derbyshire (District in England where I was born) on things unique to Derbyshire, that I discovered that they (Derbyshire-ites) swapped the meanings of the words. If you borrowed something, you paid it back with interest! Book was called "Ey up ma duck". (Means "Hello")
We could use this to good effect. The urban dictionary could be a good source.
Another source which I feel is imminently SP is cockney rhyming slang. While not "Ship shape and Bristol fashion", it is slang after all!

One could imagine posts that go on about any old tat, such as:
I took me Bag for Life to the Dolly Mixtures and left her while I went for a Bangers and Mash.
This Geoff Hoon walks up and tells me he thinks I'm Behind with the Rent.
I suggested that we step outside for an unscheduled meeting!

http://www.cockneyrhymingslang.co.uk/ to decipher
http://www.urbandictionary.com/
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von Corax
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Prof. Darwin Prætorius von Corax


« Reply #98 on: November 28, 2010, 11:08:40 am »

[massive quote-tree pruned for brevity]

I mean no offence to Von Corax however this sounds like a descusion that may have happened we the armies of the world created (and this may only be over here) the air corps. If I am no mistaken at least in the United states army air corps they were still called soldiers. It was not until the seperate Air force was created that the term airman came into exsistince (pardon spelling). I feel this would stand true for an aero corps of the navy.

No offense taken, or even considered.

Just having a surf through Wikipedia, and it appears that "Airman" is a uniquely Usanian term for a non-commissioned military flyer, while "airman" (note difference in capitalization) is a generic term for any (usually civilian) pilot. "Small-A airman" would be synonymous with "aviator," which term dates to 1887, well within the period on which we base Steampunk.

Also, while the U.S. Air Force was formed by the spin-off of the Army Air Corps in 1947, the Royal Air force was formed in 1918 from the merger of the Royal Naval Air Service and the Royal Flying Corps, itself grown out of the Corps of Royal Engineers Air Battallion in 1912; as such, the RAF chose immediately to develop their own rank titles to avoid apparent bias toward either their Army or Navy antecedents. The terms were never standardized internationally; thus any given air service might reasonably draw its titles from any other service.

Also, remember the question is not "What were they called," but rather "What might they have been called;" as such, no answer can really be considered wrong, and so I stand by my "Mariners/Marines/Aviators/Avians" parallelism.
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Sgt. Glas
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« Reply #99 on: November 28, 2010, 05:31:10 pm »


Also, remember the question is not "What were they called," but rather "What might they have been called;" as such, no answer can really be considered wrong, and so I stand by my "Mariners/Marines/Aviators/Avians" parallelism.

I see your point Herr Von Corax, and with that idea of the RAF vs. their American counterparts means that even for our militaries in our SP world could have this derivation. So we could have the US Marine Corps having Marines on airships and having a Royal Avian Corps for the same purpose. I beleive that we have a situation in which their is no wrong answer,  we may even have a place where civilians call the Marines "Avians" but are still to be considered Marines by themselves and their peers.
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