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Author Topic: Food! Food! Food! The Good, Bad, Ugly, and Tasty steampunk treats and drinks  (Read 101304 times)
Melrose
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« Reply #575 on: September 26, 2018, 11:03:56 am »

 Tongue  But no. I will not buy a Bismark / Berliner with a plastic syringe.
Perhaps I should have said they were unused syringes!  Wink
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« Reply #576 on: September 26, 2018, 08:09:54 pm »

Kinda reminds me of that cartoon of the Cookie Monster shown as a cookie dough junkie.

Family Guy - Cookie Monster
« Last Edit: September 26, 2018, 08:11:31 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged

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« Reply #577 on: November 06, 2018, 10:54:03 pm »

Crema de Aguacate con Pollo en Achiote y Jalapenos
Mexican style Cream of Avocado with Annato Seed Chicken, and Jalapeno peppers

This is a soup that comes as a derivative of cooking another dish, so in reality these are two recipes in one.




A) Chicken Leg Quarters in Achiote paste: Provides for 5 servings of chicken, but if you use the chicken for soup in the next recipe, then 3 pieces servings will be for 6 servings of soup & two leg quarters will be extra, stand alone chicken dishes (use for chicken sandwiches or tacos?).

-5 chicken leg quarters (thigh+ drumstick)

-Achiote Paste (Mexico) /a/k/a Recado Rojo (Central/South America) /a/k/a Annato Seed Paste. Difficult to get ready made in English speaking countries, unless you have a specialty ethnic market, but can be made quite easily from Annato seeds or ground seeds. Annato is what is used to colour and flavour cheeses such as Cheddar, Gouda, etc. It colours everything it touches shades of red and orange, and is a popular natural food colour. See: https://www.thespicehouse.com/recipes/annatto-paste-recipe

Marinate chicken in Achiote paste overnight in a refrigerator, and then in a large capaity pot boil the 5 leg quarters (skin, biones and fat all left intact) in water for 45 minutes. Save the water as that is a very high quality chicken stock and it's needed for the next dish below.




B) Cream of Avocado with Annato Seed Chicken, and Jalapeno peppers - 6 servings

This recipe will yield 6 servings of soup - scale as necessary. Basically every two servings (one serving for a very hungry person) will consume one well ripened avocado, one chicken quarter, one cup of chicken stock and half cup of milk. The ratio of chicken stock to milk is 2 to 1:

- Hand-pulled meat from 3 BOILED chicken quarters, de-boned and de-skinnned, and marinated in Achiote (Annato) paste from recipe above

- 3 cups of Chicken stock with Achiote (Annato) saved from recipe above. If desiored, it's easier to remove excess fat from stock if refriogerated overnight.

- 1.5 cups of whole milk or cream (depending on taste - I prefer milk - avocado is very fatty as it is, but milk fat is indispensible to achieve emulsification of chicken avocado oils)

- 3 well-ripened small size avocadoes, if you have access to large avocadoes ypu may need less. These will be mashed to make the cream itself.

- 1.5 small avocadoes (don't need to be so ripe) used as garnish for the soup, and cut in wedges

- 3 (optional) small Jalapeno peppers - 1/2 for each serving. Substitute for a strong herb to taste, like parsley, if you don't like heat, but I very much recommend keeping it, because Jalapeno unlike other peppers, has a LOT of herbal flavour which compliments the chicken and avocado and cuts through the heaviness of of the chicken stock and milk. Plus the pepper heat firmly establishes the dish's Mexican character.

Wash Jalapeno peppers thoroughly and roughly chop. Make sure your chicken meat is all pulled/shredded and de-bones and de-skinned and set aside. Wash and slice avocadoes, You want well ripened avocadoes to be pureed for the cream, and firmer ones for the garnish which will be sliced in wedges.

Place ripened avocado, milk and chicken stock in a pot and use a potato masher to mash while bringing mixture to a boil. Bring to a boil and Boil for two minutes while you mash the avocadoes. The avocado fat should completely emulsify with the chicken stock - and the milk is the reason you can do that. Drop the heat to a slow rolling boil and drop the diced Jalapeno pepper in. Continue mashing the avocados as necessary and during a low temp boil for 2 minutes. On the 4th minute drop the pulled chicken in and simmmer though 5th-6th minute. Remove the pot from the heat. Serve hot and garnish with avocado wedges and parsley.

This soup is AWESOME  the next day. Even cold in a cup at the office it's good. It can also be served cold, like Spanish Gazpacho soup.

« Last Edit: November 06, 2018, 10:59:42 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #578 on: July 22, 2019, 07:40:03 am »

What's for dinner tonight. A variation on a dish I used to make about 10 years ago. I can't get my hands on McKormick spinach dip mix anymore, so I got real spinach to make the following :

Ground beef and Turkey Patties with Spinach and Caramelized Red Onions.


The original dish called for all turkey meat and dry spinach, but I changed it to boiled spinach and a 50-50 mix of ground beef (85 percent lean) and ground turkey (80 percent lean), two pounds total meat and 1 egg to help the binding process. Mixed into the meat are one onion, diced and sautéed in olive oil (1 lb, which sounds like lot but isn't) and previously boiled spinach. The onions need to be sautéed in olive oil to the point of caramelisation before mixing with the boiled and drained spinach (draining is mandatory otherwise the spinach will turn the dish bitter).

The spinach will impart a deep green colour to the natural sauce that forms in the pan, which you will use to baste the meat as it cooks. The hero of the dish are the sweet onions which impart a caramel flavour (and colour) allowing the meat to caramelise even if submerged in the juices of the meat (its the action of the beef fat and sugar from the onion!) and whose sweetness is tempered by the bitterness and earthy undertones of the spinach. This is a very rich dish, but goes very well with herb and butter spaghetti.
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Caledonian
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« Reply #579 on: August 14, 2019, 07:24:01 pm »

replying so i can keep an eye on this thread
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I actually know basic clockmaking now!
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« Reply #580 on: August 15, 2019, 04:45:02 am »

replying so i can keep an eye on this thread

I'm going to have to make those hamburger steaks you see above soon. Like tomorrow soon.

You see, I discovered it was very practical to just place a steak in between two slices of bread and take that as lunch before work. Sadly for the following week, I thought of buying frozen patties in the supermarket. Not the best, but something that looked relatively good and pricey.  The brand which I will not mention has a cute cowboy hat in the box. The label read it was the finest from a brand based in the State of Nebraska.

I found out that in the State of Nebraska they don't have a clue what a hamburger tastes like (Sorry Nebraskans, nothing personal, but your haburgers suck). The problem it's that it's a hamburger steak with a sausage complex, which leads to a hamburger sandwich that tastes like New York style Beef Frank Hot Dog. Nothing against beef franks, or New York, I happen to like both, but when I bite a hamburger I don't expect to taste a hot dog.  Grin
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