Author Topic: Food! Food! Food! The Good, Bad, Ugly, and Tasty steampunk treats and drinks  (Read 138071 times)

Melrose

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Re: Food! Food! Food! The Good, Bad, Ugly, and Tasty steampunk treats and drinks
« Reply #575 on: September 26, 2018, 10:03:56 am »
 :P  But no. I will not buy a Bismark / Berliner with a plastic syringe.
Perhaps I should have said they were unused syringes!  ;)

J. Wilhelm

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Re: Food! Food! Food! The Good, Bad, Ugly, and Tasty steampunk treats and drinks
« Reply #576 on: September 26, 2018, 07:09:54 pm »
Kinda reminds me of that cartoon of the Cookie Monster shown as a cookie dough junkie.

Family Guy - Cookie Monster
« Last Edit: September 26, 2018, 07:11:31 pm by J. Wilhelm »

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Re: Food! Food! Food! The Good, Bad, Ugly, and Tasty steampunk treats and drinks
« Reply #577 on: November 06, 2018, 09:54:03 pm »
Crema de Aguacate con Pollo en Achiote y Jalapenos
Mexican style Cream of Avocado with Annato Seed Chicken, and Jalapeno peppers

This is a soup that comes as a derivative of cooking another dish, so in reality these are two recipes in one.




A) Chicken Leg Quarters in Achiote paste: Provides for 5 servings of chicken, but if you use the chicken for soup in the next recipe, then 3 pieces servings will be for 6 servings of soup & two leg quarters will be extra, stand alone chicken dishes (use for chicken sandwiches or tacos?).

-5 chicken leg quarters (thigh+ drumstick)

-Achiote Paste (Mexico) /a/k/a Recado Rojo (Central/South America) /a/k/a Annato Seed Paste. Difficult to get ready made in English speaking countries, unless you have a specialty ethnic market, but can be made quite easily from Annato seeds or ground seeds. Annato is what is used to colour and flavour cheeses such as Cheddar, Gouda, etc. It colours everything it touches shades of red and orange, and is a popular natural food colour. See: https://www.thespicehouse.com/recipes/annatto-paste-recipe

Marinate chicken in Achiote paste overnight in a refrigerator, and then in a large capaity pot boil the 5 leg quarters (skin, biones and fat all left intact) in water for 45 minutes. Save the water as that is a very high quality chicken stock and it's needed for the next dish below.




B) Cream of Avocado with Annato Seed Chicken, and Jalapeno peppers - 6 servings

This recipe will yield 6 servings of soup - scale as necessary. Basically every two servings (one serving for a very hungry person) will consume one well ripened avocado, one chicken quarter, one cup of chicken stock and half cup of milk. The ratio of chicken stock to milk is 2 to 1:

- Hand-pulled meat from 3 BOILED chicken quarters, de-boned and de-skinnned, and marinated in Achiote (Annato) paste from recipe above

- 3 cups of Chicken stock with Achiote (Annato) saved from recipe above. If desiored, it's easier to remove excess fat from stock if refriogerated overnight.

- 1.5 cups of whole milk or cream (depending on taste - I prefer milk - avocado is very fatty as it is, but milk fat is indispensible to achieve emulsification of chicken avocado oils)

- 3 well-ripened small size avocadoes, if you have access to large avocadoes ypu may need less. These will be mashed to make the cream itself.

- 1.5 small avocadoes (don't need to be so ripe) used as garnish for the soup, and cut in wedges

- 3 (optional) small Jalapeno peppers - 1/2 for each serving. Substitute for a strong herb to taste, like parsley, if you don't like heat, but I very much recommend keeping it, because Jalapeno unlike other peppers, has a LOT of herbal flavour which compliments the chicken and avocado and cuts through the heaviness of of the chicken stock and milk. Plus the pepper heat firmly establishes the dish's Mexican character.

Wash Jalapeno peppers thoroughly and roughly chop. Make sure your chicken meat is all pulled/shredded and de-bones and de-skinned and set aside. Wash and slice avocadoes, You want well ripened avocadoes to be pureed for the cream, and firmer ones for the garnish which will be sliced in wedges.

Place ripened avocado, milk and chicken stock in a pot and use a potato masher to mash while bringing mixture to a boil. Bring to a boil and Boil for two minutes while you mash the avocadoes. The avocado fat should completely emulsify with the chicken stock - and the milk is the reason you can do that. Drop the heat to a slow rolling boil and drop the diced Jalapeno pepper in. Continue mashing the avocados as necessary and during a low temp boil for 2 minutes. On the 4th minute drop the pulled chicken in and simmmer though 5th-6th minute. Remove the pot from the heat. Serve hot and garnish with avocado wedges and parsley.

This soup is AWESOME  the next day. Even cold in a cup at the office it's good. It can also be served cold, like Spanish Gazpacho soup.

« Last Edit: November 06, 2018, 09:59:42 pm by J. Wilhelm »

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Re: Food! Food! Food! The Good, Bad, Ugly, and Tasty steampunk treats an
« Reply #578 on: July 22, 2019, 06:40:03 am »
What's for dinner tonight. A variation on a dish I used to make about 10 years ago. I can't get my hands on McKormick spinach dip mix anymore, so I got real spinach to make the following :

Ground beef and Turkey Patties with Spinach and Caramelized Red Onions.


The original dish called for all turkey meat and dry spinach, but I changed it to boiled spinach and a 50-50 mix of ground beef (85 percent lean) and ground turkey (80 percent lean), two pounds total meat and 1 egg to help the binding process. Mixed into the meat are one onion, diced and sautéed in olive oil (1 lb, which sounds like lot but isn't) and previously boiled spinach. The onions need to be sautéed in olive oil to the point of caramelisation before mixing with the boiled and drained spinach (draining is mandatory otherwise the spinach will turn the dish bitter).

The spinach will impart a deep green colour to the natural sauce that forms in the pan, which you will use to baste the meat as it cooks. The hero of the dish are the sweet onions which impart a caramel flavour (and colour) allowing the meat to caramelise even if submerged in the juices of the meat (its the action of the beef fat and sugar from the onion!) and whose sweetness is tempered by the bitterness and earthy undertones of the spinach. This is a very rich dish, but goes very well with herb and butter spaghetti.

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replying so i can keep an eye on this thread
Passion is like a Peatfire

J. Wilhelm

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replying so i can keep an eye on this thread

I'm going to have to make those hamburger steaks you see above soon. Like tomorrow soon.

You see, I discovered it was very practical to just place a steak in between two slices of bread and take that as lunch before work. Sadly for the following week, I thought of buying frozen patties in the supermarket. Not the best, but something that looked relatively good and pricey.  The brand which I will not mention has a cute cowboy hat in the box. The label read it was the finest from a brand based in the State of Nebraska.

I found out that in the State of Nebraska they don't have a clue what a hamburger tastes like (Sorry Nebraskans, nothing personal, but your haburgers suck). The problem it's that it's a hamburger steak with a sausage complex, which leads to a hamburger sandwich that tastes like New York style Beef Frank Hot Dog. Nothing against beef franks, or New York, I happen to like both, but when I bite a hamburger I don't expect to taste a hot dog.  ;D

J. Wilhelm

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Today I bring a recipe inspired by Rovingjack's Arts and Crafts thread. It is a cross between Mexican Stuffed Pepper (Chile Relleno and a Croissant.

The idea came when Rovingjack made a stuffed pepper dish in this thread:
http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,47768.msg999795.html#msg999795

I wondered if I could make a variation, because the Mexican version is a complicated affair that calls for roasting the pepper and peeling it, making a sweet minced pork filling, often with bits of fruit like raisin and nuts, and then the meat is used as stuffing with cheese, before taking the whole pepper, dipping it in batter and deep frying. To make things more complicated, the deep fried peppers are then covered in sauce and inexplicably baked like a Lasagna. Why, I don't know. The last step makes the batter soggy, but that is the tradition.

So I realized that I could use minced meat from the dish I show above in this page. Just take my onion Spinach turkey loaf and use it as stuffing. The meat is already sweet because of the onion. Next I though I could substitute the batter and deep frying by simply using puff pastry. The kind you buy pre rolled at the supermarket. That saves me one horrible step, and is traditional because Croissants were a French import to Mexico in the 19th century.

So we start with one of these.


Making sure one of these doesn't get to it first


Roast on the burner, peel and split the poblano pepper. Stuff it with a cheese The original Mexican Chile Relleno would be stuffed with something like Oaxaca or Asadero Cheeses, roughly the same as Provolone or Mozarella.


Break apart the meat which must be previously cooked and basically lay it like a sandwich between the two slices of cheese.

de

Get pre rolled puff pastry dough and carefully place the stuffed Poblano on it. I'm using croissant roll dough, which is a bit sweeter and fluffier than real puff pastry made from scratch.


Cover it top and bottom. For the season I made it to look a bit like a coffin. Crimp the edges. I basically used the whole Pillsbury brand container (yields enough for 6 small croissants).


Bake for 15 minutes in 400 F preheated oven Again, this is NOT safe if you haven't roasted the pepper first and thoroughly cooked the filling beforehand, because the inside will not get hot enough to cook the meat.


There you have Croissant Relleno. The dough was difficult to bake in a toaster oven. The pastry tends to burn if it's too close to the heating elements. You need a large oven for better results. But the resulting pastry is extremely light and crispy.  The dough is obviously very buttery. But the lightness is impressive in this dish. You would expect it to be so heavy.

The cheese doesn't overwhelm the filling, and the puff pastry only contributes a  butter flavor. The onion in the meat and the Poblano which is a hot pepper about 1/2 to 1/5 as spicy as a Jalapeño doesn't carry the tongue burning power that I normally associate with Poblano peppers. Note that Bell Pepper (Capsicum for those of you in the antipodes) carries zero heat in the Scoville scale, so it may be used as a substitute, but I prefer the spicy Poblanos which when smoke carry intense fruity notes besides the heat.


It's an absolute explosion of flavor. The pepper introduces these fruity herbal notes and a juicyness as well. The pastry might need to be trimmed a bit before baking, but it worked beautifully. Now it needs a sauce. Traditionally this would be a tomato based sauce. And due to the heightened Frenchness of the dish (onion, olive oil, butter, puff pastry) I'm inclined to say the sauce should be something like a tomato Bisque. Perhaps a spicy version of a tomato Bisque, as the pepper is not all that hot (depends on how you roasted the pepper and gutted the seeds inside).
« Last Edit: October 07, 2019, 06:49:40 am by J. Wilhelm »

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Mm

morozow

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You take food from a slow cooker?

First I make ham from a piece of pork. Spices depend on my mood. But it's just a piece of rope and a push of a button.

And further more interesting. After the pork in the bowl multivarki remains the juice and fat.

I take a measure of the peas, soak them while I'm at work.

I pass onions and carrots.

I take a pre-left piece of pork and cut into small pieces.

I put everything in a slow cooker. Peas, pork, carrots/onions. And put on cooking.

It turns out a real man's food.  Hearty, fatty, spicy pea porridge.
Sorry for the errors, rudeness and stupidity. It's not me, this online translator. Really convenient?

J. Wilhelm

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You take food from a slow cooker?

First I make ham from a piece of pork. Spices depend on my mood. But it's just a piece of rope and a push of a button.

And further more interesting. After the pork in the bowl multivarki remains the juice and fat.

I take a measure of the peas, soak them while I'm at work.

I pass onions and carrots.

I take a pre-left piece of pork and cut into small pieces.

I put everything in a slow cooker. Peas, pork, carrots/onions. And put on cooking.

It turns out a real man's food.  Hearty, fatty, spicy pea porridge.

Most definitely, we accept pork stews. There's a long tradition of pork and peas stews in Colonial Era United States (1700s). I have previously posted some videos from this YouTube channel

https://m.youtube.com/channel/UCxr2d4As312LulcajAkKJYw

Synistor 303

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Just made the turkey roll for Christmas... I was tired, so I came in here and all I see is more food! (I don't mind really.)

That poor dog looks as if it's STARVING. It's very talented. It never ceases to amaze me how our two cocker spaniels can make gooey, starving expressions the moment I go into the kitchen - even if they were fed 5 minutes before. Of course I am waay to mean to indulge a couple of lazy good-for-nothing dogs.  ::)

The turkey roll weighed 8 kilos when finished, so no wonder I got tired. I reckon I lifted the bleedin' thing at least 20 times moving it around taking the bones and sinews out and making the meat filling then sewing it up and rolling it in paper, aluminium foil and plastic wrap. We have about 25 family members come for Christmas so we do the whole over-the-top Christmas thing and mighty is the planning. We even have spreadsheets! In the northern hemisphere you have Halloween and Thanksgiving, so I guess by the time Christmas comes around you are all cooked-out. Down here Christmas is the end of the school year and the beginning of the long summer holidays, so it is a big deal (at least for us). We start the day with mango slices in champagne, so everything has to be ready before hand otherwise we will end 'doing an Aunty Pat' (she would invite people over for dinner, then start drinking sherry and the guests would end up cooking the meal). Aunty Pat was a smart old lady...

J. Wilhelm

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Just made the turkey roll for Christmas... I was tired, so I came in here and all I see is more food! (I don't mind really.)

That poor dog looks as if it's STARVING. It's very talented. It never ceases to amaze me how our two cocker spaniels can make gooey, starving expressions the moment I go into the kitchen - even if they were fed 5 minutes before. Of course I am waay to mean to indulge a couple of lazy good-for-nothing dogs.  ::)

The turkey roll weighed 8 kilos when finished, so no wonder I got tired. I reckon I lifted the bleedin' thing at least 20 times moving it around taking the bones and sinews out and making the meat filling then sewing it up and rolling it in paper, aluminium foil and plastic wrap. We have about 25 family members come for Christmas so we do the whole over-the-top Christmas thing and mighty is the planning. We even have spreadsheets! In the northern hemisphere you have Halloween and Thanksgiving, so I guess by the time Christmas comes around you are all cooked-out. Down here Christmas is the end of the school year and the beginning of the long summer holidays, so it is a big deal (at least for us). We start the day with mango slices in champagne, so everything has to be ready before hand otherwise we will end 'doing an Aunty Pat' (she would invite people over for dinner, then start drinking sherry and the guests would end up cooking the meal). Aunty Pat was a smart old lady...

I know, right? Forget an Oscar nomination for Joaquin Phoenix. He's got nothing over my roommate's dog. I think he even sucks his stomach and face on purpose.

I'd never heard of the Christmas shift in the calendar. Makes sense though with the seasons being inverted. I though I was the only one who used spreadsheets for holiday recipes. Though it's very convenient when scaling up or down a recipe. About 19 years ago, I used to cook Christmas Dinner for 10-12 people.

J. Wilhelm

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Re: Food! Food! Food! The Good, Bad, Ugly, and Tasty steampunk treats and drinks
« Reply #587 on: September 15, 2020, 04:31:19 am »
Since tomorrow is the 16th of September Independence holiday in Mexico (starting late at night on the 15th), I can share with you a food associated with the holiday by way of myth.

The dish in question is "Chile Relleno en Nogada," a stuffed Poblano pepper with minced pork and beef, pine nuts, and covered in a white walnut sauce with pomegranate seeds.

Chile en Nogada



The myth behind the dish is that it was first prepared by nuns at the Santa Monica cloister in the city of Puebla, in honor of the first ruler of independent Mexico, Emperor Agustín I.

Agustín de Iturbide was actually a constitutionally elected emperor, and before the consummation of independence, he was the direct equivalent of George Washington in the United States.

First Constitutional Emperor of Mexico, Agustín I,
also known as General Agustín de Iturbide


Iturbide was actually the general in charge of the New-Spanish Continental Army, much in the same way General George Washington led the American Continental Army. The only difference being that at first, in 1810, Iturbide fought against the insurgent independence movement which had declared independence in the wee hours of the morning of 16 September 1810.

When Napoléon Bonaparte forced the Spanish crown into submission, however, many nobles within the global Spanish empire realized that that they could be controlled by a foreign power. Seeing Spain's rapid decay in that first decade of the 19th century, the lack of support from Spain and the strength of the independence movement, at some point the Spanish nobility in Mexico decided to join the independence movement. By 1821, General Iturbide had joined forces with the republican independence movement under the "Treaty of Iguala, " and the army was nicknamed the "Army of the Three Guarantees."

The flag of the Army of the Three Guarantees


The flag adopted by the new Mexican Continental Army under Iturbide had three bands, each representing a different tenet, or guarantee of the new armed movement. The white color, represents the Catholic Faith. Green is the symbol for freedom, and red is the symbol for the blood ties between the Native and the Spanish in the new nation.

The legend of the dish, however cropped up in the 19th century, and it was said that those nuns at the Santa Monica cloister chose ingredients which matched the flag colors, first serving the dish to the New Emperor, Agustín I. But the dish did not originate with Mexico's independence. Recipe books from the 18th century show very similar recipes, and in fact it looks like the dish was all-sweet, with fruit filling instead of meat, and served as a dessert, instead of a main course.

Hilary and Greg, that couple from Dallas from the Kinetic Kennons channel at YouTube, whom I've introduced in my posts at brassgoggles in the past, are back in Mexico after returning to Texas during the pandemic. Hilary surprises us today by preparing a Chile en Nogada... (I thought it was a cute gesture, so I'm posting it here...

Gringa Cooks Chiles en Nogada
« Last Edit: September 15, 2020, 04:46:56 am by J. Wilhelm »

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I've posted this dish in other sections of Brassgoggles before, but for some reson had not posted here. This is a very simple recipe, as you're not really cooking much at all, just bringing ingredients together and boiling to bring the flavours together.

The dish in question is a contemporary street food popular in the City of Toluca, in the State of Mexico, barely 30 miles East Southeast from Mexico City. Its a dish consisting of meatballs, beans and a very spicy barbecue sauce called Adobo, made from whole fire roasted red-Jalapeno peppers, which when cured by themselves are called Chipotle Peppers. This is considered to be a mountain food of sorts.

Toluca is at the foot of the Xinantecatl volcano (summit 15 kft), aka Nevado de Toluca, within a minor valley that historically was dedicated to the beef and pork industry. History records show that this valley was part of a land grant given to Hernan Cortes by the KIng of Spain (and Holy Roman Emperor) Charles V in 1529, after his conquest of the Aztec Empire in 1521. Since Cortes apparently had been a successful hog and cattle rancher in Cuba, he planned to recreate his business success in that valley. In time the valley became renowned for it's livestock industry, and became famous for its pork and beef products such as chorizo sausage. Today Toluca is considered an industrial city, along with the City of Puebla in the opposite, southwest end of the greater Valley of Mexico.

Valley in the "Nevado de Toluca" (Xinantecatl) National Park


City of Toluca de Lerdo


All the ingredients are pre-cooked. The ingredient list is as follows:

- 35 Oz / 992 grams of pre-cooked frozen meatballs (about 33 medium size meatballs).
- 28 Oz / 800 grams of baked beans -about two cans.  (eg "Bush's Best" beans, bacon and maple flavored).
- 29 Oz / 820 grams of small diced tomatoes - preferably with garlic (eg. HEB Central Market dices tomatoes with Garlic and Ilive Oil")
- 14.5 to 29 Oz / 212 to 424 grams of whole or diced Chipotle peppers in Adobo Sauce (1 to 2 small cans, adjust quantity for level of heat - one can minimum -  eg. San Marcos brand or La Costena Brand).
- add one whole can of water before boiling.

There's no need to thaw the meatballs, as they are pre-cooked. In a large pot place the two cans of tomato, the two cans of beans and one to two cans of whole Chipotle (aka Chilpotle) peppers adjusting to taste. You can start with one can of diced peppers with their sauce, and if at the end of the cooking process you think you want more spiciness, you can add part or the whole second can of diced Chipotle peppers. Place meatballs in the pot and add the can of water. Cover and boil in medium heat for at least for 30 minutes, or until the sauce thickens to typical baked beans consistency. Routinely stir the bottom of the pot to prevent the beans from sticking and burning at the bottom of the pot.










I haven't done so here, but there's many ways to garnish the dish. I think that a salty fresh cheese, such as Feta crumbs, sprinkled on top would be perfect.


In central Mexico, where you had more of a French influence in the 19th. C. the dish will be served at the table with a small mini-baguette form of bread called Bolillo.

« Last Edit: April 10, 2021, 01:58:46 am by J. Wilhelm »

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Kinda reminds me of that cartoon of the Cookie Monster shown as a cookie dough junkie.

Family Guy - Cookie Monster

 Cookie monster has always been a dodgy character. The Count was another one . And the guy painting 8s

 And that chef who always dropped the cream pies  could he not stay sober just once

Hurricane Annie

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I've posted this dish in other sections of Brassgoggles before, but for some reson had not posted here. This is a very simple recipe, as you're not really cooking much at all, just bringing ingredients together and boiling to bring the flavours together.

The dish in question is a contemporary street food popular in the City of Toluca, in the State of Mexico, barely 30 miles East Southeast from Mexico City. Its a dish consisting of meatballs, beans and a very spicy barbecue sauce made called Adobo, made from whole fire roasted red-Jalapeno peppers which when cured by themselves are called Chipotle Peppers. This is considered to be a mountain food of sorts.

Toluca is at the foot of the Xinantecatl volcano (summit 15 kft), aka Nevado de Toluca, within a minor valley that historically was dedicated to the beef and pork industry. History records show that this valley was part of a land grant given to Hernan Cortes by the KIng of Spain (and Holy Roman Emperor)  after his conquest of the Aztec Empire. Since Cortes apparently had been a successful hog and cattle rancher in Cuba, he planned to recreate his business success in that valley. In time the valley became renowned for it's livestock industry, and became famous for its pork and beef products such as chorizo sausage. Today Toluca is considered an industrial city, along with the City of Puebla in the southwest end of the greater Valley of Mexico.

Valley in the "Nevado de Toluca" (Xinantecatl) National Park


City of Toluca de Lerdo


All the ingredients are pre-cooked. The ingredient list is as follows:

- 35 Oz / 992 grams of pre-cooked frozen meatballs (about 33 medium size meatballs).
- 28 Oz / 800 grams of baked beans -about two cans.  (eg "Bush's Best" beans, bacon and maple flavored).
- 29 Oz / 820 grams of small diced tomatoes - preferably with garlic (eg. HEB Central Market dices tomatoes with Garlic and Ilive Oil")
- 14.5 to 29 Oz / 212 to 424 grams of whole or diced Chipotle peppers in Adobo Sauce (1 to 2 small cans, adjust quantity for level of heat - one can minimum -  eg. San Marcos brand or La Costena Brand).
- add one whole can of water before boiling.

There's no need to thaw the meatballs, as they are pre-cooked. In a large pot place the two cans of tomato, the two cans of beans and one to two cans of whole Chipotle (aka Chilpotle) peppers adjusting to taste. You can start with one can of diced peppers with their sauce, and if at the end of the cooking process you think you want more spiciness, you can add past or the whole second can of diced Chipotle peppers. Place meatballs in the pot and add the can of water. Cover and boil in medium heat for at least for 30 minutes, or until the sauce thickens to typical baked beans consistency. Routinely stir the bottom of the pot to prevent the beans from sticking and burning at the bottom of the pot.










 That dish, fit for a king,  would be easy to recreate in the NZ kitchen. Frozen meatballs and Maple flavoured beans  are not readily available. They are though simple enough to improvise or make your own .

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SNIP

 That dish, fit for a king,  would be easy to recreate in the NZ kitchen. Frozen meatballs and Maple flavoured beans  are not readily available. They are though simple enough to improvise or make your own .

One way to do it is to cook the meatballs, Italian style in tomato sauce, then add fried bacon (the Maple is optional, but I liked the combination with bacon), then at the end add the pre-cooked beans. The fresher the ingredients, the better it will taste.

The only difficult ingredient to find overseas is Chipotle in Adobo, but these are just Jalapeno peppers which have been ripened in the vine until they turn red, and then they are roasted, part of them are ground and made into Adobo sauce which you can make too. I'm starting to find adverts for it in other places around the globe. Any smoked hot pepper could do it in the worst case scenario.

Home made Chipotle Peppers:
https://keviniscooking.com/how-to-make-chipotle-peppers/

Home made Adobo Sauce (it  uses the same ground Chipotle Peppers you made above)
https://keviniscooking.com/how-to-make-adobo-sauce/
« Last Edit: April 10, 2021, 12:41:53 am by J. Wilhelm »

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SNIP

 That dish, fit for a king,  would be easy to recreate in the NZ kitchen. Frozen meatballs and Maple flavoured beans  are not readily available. They are though simple enough to improvise or make your own .

One way to do it is to cook the meatballs, Italian style in tomato sauce, then add fried bacon (the Maple is optional, but I liked the combination with bacon), then at the end add the pre-cooked beans. The fresher the ingredients, the better it will taste.

The only difficult ingredient to find overseas is Chipotle in Adobo, but these are just Jalapeno peppers which have been ripened in the vine until they turn red, and then they are roasted, part of them are ground and made into Adobo sauce which you can make too. I'm starting to find adverts for it in other places around the globe. Any smoked hot pepper could do it in the worst case scenario.

Home made Chipotle Peppers:
https://keviniscooking.com/how-to-make-chipotle-peppers/

Home made Adobo Sauce (it  uses the same ground Chipotle Peppers you made above)
https://keviniscooking.com/how-to-make-adobo-sauce/

Jalapeno seeds and seedlings are readily available in Australia so you can grow your own. Smokers can be made from an old Weber BBQ, although we had a beauty made from an old enamel refrigerator (which we sold to a chef when we left the farm). I think you can even buy hickory chips, but we tend to use apple wood (because we have the trees). And down here we call peppers 'capsicum' (if they are sweet) or chillies (if they are hot).

Hurricane Annie

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 That dish, fit for a king,  would be easy to recreate in the NZ kitchen. Frozen meatballs and Maple flavoured beans  are not readily available. They are though simple enough to improvise or make your own .

One way to do it is to cook the meatballs, Italian style in tomato sauce, then add fried bacon (the Maple is optional, but I liked the combination with bacon), then at the end add the pre-cooked beans. The fresher the ingredients, the better it will taste.

The only difficult ingredient to find overseas is Chipotle in Adobo, but these are just Jalapeno peppers which have been ripened in the vine until they turn red, and then they are roasted, part of them are ground and made into Adobo sauce which you can make too. I'm starting to find adverts for it in other places around the globe. Any smoked hot pepper could do it in the worst case scenario.

Home made Chipotle Peppers:
https://keviniscooking.com/how-to-make-chipotle-peppers/

Home made Adobo Sauce (it  uses the same ground Chipotle Peppers you made above)
https://keviniscooking.com/how-to-make-adobo-sauce/

Jalapeno seeds and seedlings are readily available in Australia so you can grow your own. Smokers can be made from an old Weber BBQ, although we had a beauty made from an old enamel refrigerator (which we sold to a chef when we left the farm). I think you can even buy hickory chips, but we tend to use apple wood (because we have the trees). And down here we call peppers 'capsicum' (if they are sweet) or chillies (if they are hot).

 Most Central and South American plants grow well in Aus and NZ.  We are very lucky

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 Most Central and South American plants grow well in Aus and NZ.  We are very lucky
Looks like there are a couple of Mexican grocery importers in Australia. I can't opine on the prices. Naturally it'll be overly expensive, but I found this can of Chipotle peppers in Adobo, which might make your life a lot easier. They also sell dried Chipotle peppers. At $20 AUS for a can of Chipotles you'd have to treasure them, but it's a 2kg can of the stuff! That's about 10 times what you need! Freeze it perhaps?

https://importedmexicanfoods.com/product/el-mexicano-chipotle-chilies-in-adobo/

Their pantry is a bit limited, but there's a couple of other items that look interesting in this shop. They rely on a few brands I've seen in United States' supermarkets :

Goya is not Mexican, but rather an American brand started by Cuban Americans in Florida (I think I'm correct) which specializes in generic Latin American foods.

The brand called "El Mexicano" is not Mexican either, but Mexican-American owned (also a US company  based in San José, California), and these folk basically make shameless copies of various Mexican brands, like Gamesa, and Barcel, which you can now get in your supermarket directly from Mexico or even American made. It's only a matter of time before they get in trouble for copyright infringement, because many of their snacks are virtual copies of products that are sold directly by Mexican established transnational companies in the US (eg Bimbo Group bakers), but it's worth a look. They offer canned whole and pureed tomatillos, Chipotle in Adobo (above),

La Costeña, is a legit Mexican brand, and they export to the US. Many of their canned goods like salsas and condiments are good. Similar to Herdez (below), but a much smaller company.

Herdez is a big-box Mexican company specializing in salsas and canned vegetables of every kind. They export to the US. The most popular brand of spicy condiments in Mexico. Check out their red "salsa casera" /"home style" and green salsas, plus their new Guacamole salsa (tomatillo-guacamole salsa) these are considered universal in any diner or taco stand. Not the best you can find, but definitely the most common everywhere. It's nice having in the refrigerator.

Things that are worth your time:

MaSeCa  corn masa flour. This is what you use to make Tortillas, Sopes, Tamales and even a hot drink called Atole. Being on the other side of the Pacific it might be worth a look.

Coronado brand Cajeta. A super thick goat milk caramel sauce guaranteed to give Arnott's a run for their money in terms of international sweet addictive power. Coronado is the best brand. A must have. Use it over pancakes: Dilute it with a bit of rum and butter and pour it over crêpes -a legit French-Mex dish. You can't go wrong on this one. (PS: They changed the name from Cajeta to "Caramel Topping" because apparently the word is deeply offensive to Cuban Americans. The word in Cuban slang refers to female genitalia  ::), after an uproar the Mexican exporter caved in and changed the name, which only made Mexican Americans sigh in disbelief, and local competition took advantage and started selling it as Cajeta, ignoring Cuban American hooting and hollering over the matter - BTW the word in Mexico is thought to originate from the Spanish word for box, because it used to be sold in wooden boxes. Also never mention the word "Papaya" (the fruit) to a Cuban - it also means female genitalia - but only to Cubans... I think they're obsessed with female genitalia, but that's just my opinion).

San Luis brand? Cuitlacoche / Huitlacoche - this is a corn fungus also known as corn smut in the US. In spite of the horrible name and worst appearance (zombie brains), this is considered a delicacy. The "Mexican Truffle". A very elegant dish created in the 1950s by a Mexican restaurant is to make a Huitlacoche filling for savoury crêpes (recipes online). I have never tried it from a can. So I can't promise anything.

WARNING: Ignore their "cheese section." Cheddar cheese is NOT Mexican.  Neither is American processed cheese. Nachos and Nacho Cheese are *entirely* an American Atomic Age invention. Feta cheese is not Mexican either, but it closely resembles a number of salty white cheeses in Mexico used to garnish dishes.
« Last Edit: April 11, 2021, 06:00:30 am by J. Wilhelm »

Hurricane Annie

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SNIP

 Most Central and South American plants grow well in Aus and NZ.  We are very lucky
Looks like there are a couple of Mexican grocery importers in Australia. I can't opine on the prices. Naturally it'll be overly expensive, but I found this can of Chipotle peppers in Adobo, which might make your life a lot easier. They also sell dried Chipotle peppers. At $20 AUS for a can of Chipotles you'd have to treasure them, but it's a 2kg can of the stuff! That's about 10 times what you need! Freeze it perhaps?

https://importedmexicanfoods.com/product/el-mexicano-chipotle-chilies-in-adobo/

Their pantry is a bit limited, but there's a couple of other items that look interesting in this shop. They rely on a few brands I've seen in United States' supermarkets :

Goya is not Mexican, but rather an American brand started by Cuban Americans in Florida (I think I'm correct) which specializes in generic Latin American foods.

The brand called "El Mexicano" is not Mexican either, but Mexican-American owned (also a US company  based in San José, California), and these folk basically make shameless copies of various Mexican brands, like Gamesa, and Barcel, which you can now get in your supermarket directly from Mexico or even American made. It's only a matter of time before they get in trouble for copyright infringement, because many of their snacks are virtual copies of products that are sold directly by Mexican established transnational companies in the US (eg Bimbo Group bakers), but it's worth a look. They offer canned whole and pureed tomatillos, Chipotle in Adobo (above),

La Costeña, is a legit Mexican brand, and they export to the US. Many of their canned goods like salsas and condiments are good. Similar to Herdez (below), but a much smaller company.

Herdez is a big-box Mexican company specializing in salsas and canned vegetables of every kind. They export to the US. The most popular brand of spicy condiments in Mexico. Check out their red "salsa casera" /"home style" and green salsas, plus their new Guacamole salsa (tomatillo-guacamole salsa) these are considered universal in any diner or taco stand. Not the best you can find, but definitely the most common everywhere. It's nice having in the refrigerator.

Things that are worth your time:

MaSeCa  corn masa flour. This is what you use to make Tortillas, Sopes, Tamales and even a hot drink called Atole. Being on the other side of the Pacific it might be worth a look.

Coronado brand Cajeta. A super thick goat milk caramel sauce guaranteed to give Arnott's a run for their money in terms of international sweet addictive power. Coronado is the best brand. A must have. Use it over pancakes: Dilute it with a bit of rum and butter and pour it over crêpes -a legit French-Mex dish. You can't go wrong on this one. (PS: They changed the name from Cajeta to "Caramel Topping" because apparently the word is deeply offensive to Cuban Americans. The word in Cuban slang refers to female genitalia  ::), after an uproar the Mexican exporter caved in and changed the name, which only made Mexican Americans sigh in disbelief, and local competition took advantage and started selling it as Cajeta, ignoring Cuban American hooting and hollering over the matter - BTW the word in Mexico is thought to originate from the Spanish word for box, because it used to be sold in wooden boxes. Also never mention the word "Papaya" (the fruit) to a Cuban - it also means female genitalia - but only to Cubans... I think they're obsessed with female genitalia, but that's just my opinion).

San Luis brand? Cuitlacoche / Huitlacoche - this is a corn fungus also known as corn smut in the US. In spite of the horrible name and worst appearance (zombie brains), this is considered a delicacy. The "Mexican Truffle". A very elegant dish created in the 1950s by a Mexican restaurant is to make a Huitlacoche filling for savoury crêpes (recipes online). I have never tried it from a can. So I can't promise anything.

WARNING: Ignore their "cheese section." Cheddar cheese is NOT Mexican.  Neither is American processed cheese. Nachos and Nacho Cheese are *entirely* an American Atomic Age invention. Feta cheese is not Mexican either, but it closely resembles a number of salty white cheeses in Mexico used to garnish dishes.

Despite being in New Zealand, and not Australia, those products and sites will be worth exploring.  There may be NZ based products to look into , though it could be cheaper to order on line from the US.  The corn flour looks more interesting than the over processed gravy thickener we have on the shelves. Either way there is a bigger market evolving in NZ for Cajun, Mexican and Cuban foods. There is hope yet .

The goats milk "caramel topping " sounds intriguing. NZ prides itself on dairy products and encourages the development of milk based products  from diverse hooved mammals.  Sheep milking was a recent government initiative.

We also have an industry of offence taken  over product names and advertising that are culturally or socially offensive and encourage harmful activities . Human genitalia  and sexual pecadillo have a vast array of euphamism in any language. It's hard to avoid a double entendre

Here is a 15yr NZ teen  Rachel Hunter provocatively promoting Trumpet ice creams. No way did the advertising company not know the inference. They wouldn't get away with it now 35 yr later. With in 6 years NZs poster girl had married the middle aged Rod Stewart.  Was it the ad that  caught his attention ...

 

« Last Edit: April 11, 2021, 06:50:55 am by Hurricane Annie »

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Despite being in New Zealand, and not Australia, those products and sites will be worth exploring.  There may be NZ based products to look into , though it could be cheaper to order on line from the US.  The corn flour looks more interesting than the over processed gravy thickener we have on the shelves. Either way there is a bigger market evolving in NZ for Cajun, Mexican and Cuban foods. There is hope yet .

The goats milk "caramel topping " sounds intriguing. NZ prides itself on dairy products and encourages the development of milk based products  from diverse hooved mammals.  Sheep milking was a recent government initiative.

We also have an industry of offence taken  over product names and advertising that are culturally or socially offensive and encourage harmful activities . Human genitalia  and sexual pecadillo have a vast array of euphamism in any language. It's hard to avoid a double entendre

Here is a 15yr NZ teen  Rachel Hunter provocatively promoting Trumpet ice creams. No way did the advertising company not know the inference. They wouldn't get away with it now 35 yr later. With in 6 years NZs poster girl had married the middle aged Rod Stewart.  Was it the ad that  caught his attention ...

 



I also think that you might get away with ordering online from the US. Especially since two of the brands I mentioned are American. Of those brands I mentioned, I can find all regular supermarket chains. I just don't know if / how it is possible to send foodstuffs by mail to the antipodes, with strict import regulations and all. I've only shipped inert stuff to Australia before. I imagine cans would be ok, as well as caramel containers. The Masa flour is more difficult because you're taking about weight in the range of kilograms, and shipping over FedEx becomes prohibitively expensive - that is when you turn to food importers.

The masa is basically used with water for Tortillas or chicken stock for Sopes (learning to flatten a tortilla is trivial if you use a plastic freezer bag and a cast iron pan over the counter. The instruccions are usually printed on the bag. Lard, Tallow, or vegetable shortening is used to make the tamales (steamed). Plenty of recipes online.

The caramel sauce is thicker than a similar product called "Dulce de Leche;" the difference is that Dulce de Leche is made from condensed milk (or regular milk), whereas Cajeta is made from goat milk. As you'd imagine the goat milk caramel is much thicker and buttery. My local supermarket HEB has a producer in México for the Cajeta and sells under their store brand for 2-4 dollars depending on the container. I think El Mexicano also sells the stuff, but with Coronado and HEB selling it here in Austin, I haven't seen any other brands. Usually it's a glass jar (less than 10 Oz), but the other brand sells it in plastic containers. It'd be much faster and cheaper to get someone to ship a Coronado plastic bottle (about $5 plus shipping?) from the US. I don't even want to see the price from that Australian importer.
« Last Edit: April 12, 2021, 10:05:01 pm by J. Wilhelm »

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If sending stuff to Australia - no meat (even tinned) and no dairy (even tinned). Seeds (for the garden) need to be in a commercial packet. There are restrictions on certain seeds and nuts, so best not to risk it.

When returning from the UK many years ago, we brought in a couple of tins of smoked paprika and that was OK, but we can now easily buy the same thing here.

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If sending stuff to Australia - no meat (even tinned) and no dairy (even tinned). Seeds (for the garden) need to be in a commercial packet. There are restrictions on certain seeds and nuts, so best not to risk it.

When returning from the UK many years ago, we brought in a couple of tins of smoked paprika and that was OK, but we can now easily buy the same thing here.

 new Zealand appears to have very  loose  restrictions on sending food here. Which is quite risky due to the high reliance on agri business

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If sending stuff to Australia - no meat (even tinned) and no dairy (even tinned). Seeds (for the garden) need to be in a commercial packet. There are restrictions on certain seeds and nuts, so best not to risk it.

When returning from the UK many years ago, we brought in a couple of tins of smoked paprika and that was OK, but we can now easily buy the same thing here.

I just remembered what you wrote on making mole with fruit, which was not so well liked by the family. It was you , wasn't it? Is this the mole you made?

http://www.mexican-authentic-recipes.com/salsa_and_dips-mole_xico.html

Quote
Mole from Xico
a sweet mole


This mole is originally from the town of Xico, in Veracruz. This beautiful location, situated in the center of the state of Veracruz, was designated “Magical Village" in 2011 and it keeps all the colonial charm of the province, surrounded by mountains and large coffee plantations. Its gastronomy is extensive and its most famous and typical preparation is the mole from Xico.

This mole is similar to the Puebla style mole, but the combination of its ingredients turn out into a sweeter salsa than the traditional mole – but equally delicious and complex in flavors and aromas. In fact is the sweetest mole that there is within the large mole repertoire that exists in Mexico.


I think I understand now. This might be too sweet with the fruit for most savory ingredients. It's basically a highly regionalized style of mole, from the State of Veracruz. To be honest I had never heard of this one before!! You might want to try the regular Poblano style mole.