Author Topic: Food! Food! Food! The Good, Bad, Ugly, and Tasty steampunk treats and drinks  (Read 138078 times)

Brokenwatch

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I wonder how many vegans are among us?

As am i

Angus A Fitziron

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Every time I open my back door, the fragrance drives me slightly-more insane ...

I am smoking a 4 pound bone-in dry-rubbed pork shoulder over apple wood, over a drip/steam pan of apple cider, onion and garlic. I am on hour 9 of 12 at 220 degrees F., mopped hourly with cider vinegar and chile/herbs -

The fat layer will then be removed and used to season a pot of red and pinto beans which is currently-soaking in the kitchen.

You are all invited to brunch tomorrow morning - bring tortillas.  :)

Cap'n, I clearly don't visit this thread regularly enough. That sounds fantastic, making me drool just reading the words. So, do you have your own smoker ~ what is it like, did you build it yourself? The other problem I have is not enough people to eat food like this as most of my offspring and their partners shy away from anything other than chicken, sausages or mince! For Christmas I am preparing my own turkey, boning and rolling the crown, stuffed and wrapped in thinned streaky bacon. It takes on a lovely striped golden finish and is called Baked Bagpuss in our house. The rest of the turkey will be slow cooked similarly to Coq au Vin as touted by Hugh Fearnley Whittingstall this year!

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CapnHarlock

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Mr. Fitziron,

It is a commercially-made offset-heat smoker, purchased at a discount last year, because the packaging had paint spilled on it :)  Works admirably for anything smaller than a 15lb turkey :)

I love pre-boned and stuffed turkey :) I hope to do one for my family's Yule meal as well.    (My favorite recipe is listed under "FrankenChicken" in Miss Boo Dreadful's "Fuel for the Boiler" cookbook. )  If you'd like to have a bit of a laugh at the 'picky' family's expense, obtain 2 smaller birds, rather than a large turkey, bone, stuff and truss the whole birds, then stitch the neck-ends together, creating an odd-looking 4 (or 8, if you leave the wings on)-legged beast.  When they ask "What's that??", just reply "Not sure... caught it down by the nuclear power plant.."  :)

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Angus A Fitziron

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When they ask "What's that??", just reply "Not sure... caught it down by the nuclear power plant.."  :)

Now, that is a plan ...

CapnHarlock

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Having that overwhelming-fragrance problem again ... :(

Slow-braising a corned beef brisket in fresh herbs, whole spices, onions, garlic, tart apples, chorizo sausage  and lager beer.

It won't be ready until morning, then sliced potatoes, shredded cabbage and spinach will be added to the broth.. I definitely need to time things better... :(

Nitr0gene

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Having that overwhelming-fragrance problem again ... :(

Slow-braising a corned beef brisket in fresh herbs, whole spices, onions, garlic, tart apples, chorizo sausage  and lager beer.

It won't be ready until morning, then sliced potatoes, shredded cabbage and spinach will be added to the broth.. I definitely need to time things better... :(

Good lord that sounds wonderful...please send me the recipe!
Afternoon ol' bean! Now where is one legally allowed to park one's airship?

Angus A Fitziron

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Slow-braising a corned beef brisket in fresh herbs, whole spices, onions, garlic, tart apples, chorizo sausage  and lager beer.
Cap'n - do you slow braise in an oven or on the hob? I have a gas hob and even on the slowest ring at the lowest setting, I still get the food catching on the bottom, even though I'm using good quality heavy copper bottomed pans. So cooking anything over a couple of hours is a real labour of love as it requires almost constant attention! Thinking of investing in a Le Creuset or Dutch Oven ...

hexidecima

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a la creuset makes both oven and stove top cooking much less likely to scorch and stick.  Wish they weren't so expensive, my one and only LC was a holiday gift.  I also wish that my husband was a bit more accepting of things with cabbage in them.

I do have a potjie that I need to finally break in, just haven't gotten up the nerve yet. 

TribalWren

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a la creuset makes both oven and stove top cooking much less likely to scorch and stick.  Wish they weren't so expensive, my one and only LC was a holiday gift.  I also wish that my husband was a bit more accepting of things with cabbage in them.

I do have a potjie that I need to finally break in, just haven't gotten up the nerve yet. 

Did I hear potjie??! *yay* Haven't had one since I left SA......or a braai for that matter. Stupid English rain. For my sake, please break it in (take good care of it and it will take good care of you  ;))! Then send pictures of the spoils.  ;D

hexidecima

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Did I hear potjie??! *yay* Haven't had one since I left SA......or a braai for that matter. Stupid English rain. For my sake, please break it in (take good care of it and it will take good care of you  ;))! Then send pictures of the spoils.  ;D

I shall try. Hoping for some venison from a hunting friend (deer season right now in Pennsylvania, USA) to christen it with.

CapnHarlock

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*hides head in shame* I was extremely lazy with this one (and have been of late), and, after browning in a skillet, I put everything into an electric crockpot/slow-cooker. I have all-electric appliances (which I detest) and for "lowand slow/wet" the crockpot seems to be much more consistent and reliable than either the stovetop or oven

Miles (a sailor)Martin

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my sister in law to be did sheepherds pie for 30 at camp this year, yes my SCA group is a bit over the top, even though we only have 19 members in house there were no leftovers.  it is so much fun in a hospitality household at times.                    Miles (a sailor)Martin
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Warning : minstrel with a five string banjo

CapnHarlock

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For Miss Nitr0gene:

Non-Traditional Corned Beef and Cabbage.

Ingredients:

corned-beef brisket, approx 2lb., lightly-browned.
   (I lightly-peppered the meat before browning)
2 medium onions, sliced
4-8 garlic cloves, peeled
5 Mexican chorizo sausage links, browned
2 Granny Smith apples, cored and sliced.
1 head green cabbage, coarsely-shredded.

Bouquet Garni (tie with string):
2 sprigs fresh rosemary
6-8 sprigs fresh thyme
2-3 sprigs fresh oregano

Dried spices (whole):
3-5 allpsice berries
2-3 whole cloves
1/2 tsp. black peppercorns
1/2 tsp. cumin seed
1/2 tsp. coriander seed
1/4 tsp. fennel seed
1/2 tsp. mustard seed

3 12 oz. cans lager beer (something relatively-dark and tasty-
 not Guinness, but not Bud, either)
 salt, pepper to taste (be careful - corned beef can be very salty)
 
 Instructions:
 
 1) lightly brown the corned beef and sausages in olive oil
 2) place sliced onions, garlic cloves, bouquet garni and dried spices
    in the bottom of a crockpot/slow-cooker.
 3) Add the corned beef and pour the beer over, covering meat about 1/2-3/4 of
    the way.
 4) Cook on high heat for approx. 2-3 hours (until hard as a rock).
 5) At this point, add the sausage to the broth, and cover the top with all the
    apple slices.
 6) Lower crockpot to Low and go to bed - let it go all night.
 7) Remove the meats, remove and discard the veggies and spices, strain and
    de-fat the liquid. (The meat will fall apart when you lift it.)
 8) Add shredded cabbage to teh liquid and cook on High, approx. another 2 hours
    (let it get soft, but not mushy). Salt and pepper to taste after about 1 hour)
 9) Re-warm meat and serve with cabbage and rye bread.

Cubinoid

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For Miss Nitr0gene:

Non-Traditional Corned Beef and Cabbage.

Ingredients:

corned-beef brisket, approx 2lb., lightly-browned.
   (I lightly-peppered the meat before browning)
2 medium onions, sliced
4-8 garlic cloves, peeled
5 Mexican chorizo sausage links, browned
2 Granny Smith apples, cored and sliced.
1 head green cabbage, coarsely-shredded.

Bouquet Garni (tie with string):
2 sprigs fresh rosemary
6-8 sprigs fresh thyme
2-3 sprigs fresh oregano

Dried spices (whole):
3-5 allpsice berries
2-3 whole cloves
1/2 tsp. black peppercorns
1/2 tsp. cumin seed
1/2 tsp. coriander seed
1/4 tsp. fennel seed
1/2 tsp. mustard seed

3 12 oz. cans lager beer (something relatively-dark and tasty-
 not Guinness, but not Bud, either)
 salt, pepper to taste (be careful - corned beef can be very salty)
 
 Instructions:
 
 1) lightly brown the corned beef and sausages in olive oil
 2) place sliced onions, garlic cloves, bouquet garni and dried spices
    in the bottom of a crockpot/slow-cooker.
 3) Add the corned beef and pour the beer over, covering meat about 1/2-3/4 of
    the way.
 4) Cook on high heat for approx. 2-3 hours (until hard as a rock).
 5) At this point, add the sausage to the broth, and cover the top with all the
    apple slices.
 6) Lower crockpot to Low and go to bed - let it go all night.
 7) Remove the meats, remove and discard the veggies and spices, strain and
    de-fat the liquid. (The meat will fall apart when you lift it.)
 8) Add shredded cabbage to teh liquid and cook on High, approx. another 2 hours
    (let it get soft, but not mushy). Salt and pepper to taste after about 1 hour)
 9) Re-warm meat and serve with cabbage and rye bread.

Sounds yummy! I'd suggest a Real Ale though...perhaps a Bombardier or a Spitfire?
We are proud to present the Surrey Steampunk Convivial, for your pleasure:

CapnHarlock

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A Real Ale would have been wonderful :)  I have never found either of those in these benighted parts, alas.

I used Yuengling Lager, which is exceptional for a US brew (not at all like "making love in a canoe" **), because it was in the fridge - the same reason the chorizo went into the pot, it was there :)

** somewhat rude explanation of the reference, from my former Portsmouth housemate:
:
 "because American beer is f**king close to water"

Angus A Fitziron

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A Real Ale would have been wonderful :)  I have never found either of those in these benighted parts, alas.
If you can get the real Czech Budvar then they do an excellent dark lager which would be great in this recipe I should think. Also from the same country is a dark lager called Bernard. Sometimes forget how lucky we are in the UK when it comes to beer. Out with the lads the other night and I could start with Wherry bitter from just up the road and finish with Chimay Red (Blue and White also available!)from Belgium. No wonder I'm carrying 2 or 3 stones too much ...

Cubinoid

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"making love in a canoe"  ;D

Hadn't heard that one before!

Captain Reech

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My beloved is constantly asking me to prepare a 'Cockatrice' a medieval dish created by joining the front half of a suckling pig with the body of a goose (or the other way round if you prefer) but I don't really have a large enough iron pot to do it in camp. I'm doing rather well with medieval deserts though, Apple Muse, Cherry Pottage and Wardens in syrup being firm favourites with the Lord Grey's Household. Christmas will either be Beef or pork as I'm trying to recreate a traditional (pre-Elizabethan) style table but I can't get a Boars Head anywhere, Pork will probably be stuffed with ginger and prunes and the Beef will be stewed in ale and then roasted covered in a mustard crust.
"I didn't 'Blow it up' I 'Modified the way it works' OK?"

Auntie Ludmilla

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I'll be serving up my own recipe mulled wine tomorrow night (christmas eve). It consists of....
4 bottles of red wine
small bottle of brandy
1 carton orange juice
several tablespoons of demerrara sugar
6 satsumas cut in half
2 cinnamon sticks
12 cloves (stick them into the skin of the satsumas so you don't end up swallowing one)
2 bay leaves
Stick them in a pan over a very low heat.The aim is to keep it hot enough to warm your cockles but not so hot the alcohol boils off. (about 80 degrees is the danger zone I think....) Lovely. Might do a test run tonight to check I've remembered that right......  ;)
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CapnHarlock

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As 4 different people have requested this recipe in the past 2 days, I thought I would post it here as well.

If American-style turkey-stuffing ran off to the Italian Riviera and had a torrid affair with Yorkshire Pudding, this could be their love-child...

Stuffin' Muffins

1) Uncase, crumble and brown about 1 lb sweet Italian sausage (or hot, or linguisa, or chorizo - your choice)
2) Finely dice a large sweet onion, 2 stalks celery, 2 leeks (white parts) and 4 cloves garlic
3) Sweat the veggies in the rendered sausage fat (or use olive oil) and mix with the sausage in a large bowl
4) In a food processor, pulse about 1 lb of white (or better yet, porcini) mushrooms until VERY finely ground but not exactly pureed.
5) Put the minced 'shrooms in a clean tea towel and wring the bejeebers out of it - you should get almost a cup of juice and very dry mushrooms - add the juice to your gravy, later.  Add mushroom duxelle to bowl and mix.
6) Add chopped fresh parsley, thyme, small amt of fresh sage and chopped fresh basil to the mixture.
7) Tear up a whole loaf of fresh Italian/French type bread and add to the bowl
8) Add about 3-4oz. grated Parmigiane cheese and mix (A crumbled Danish Bleu or Gorgonzola works well, too, just don't tell people what you used)
9) add approx 3 whole eggs to bind, and mix thoroughly.
10) You will probably need to add chicken/turkey stock/wine/water to the mix - it should be very damp, but not yet mushy. You want the bread to still be recognizable.
11) Grease 2 muffin pans heavily - bacon grease, butter, oil, pan drippings - your choice -use a tiny bit more than you think you need.
12) Fill the muffin tins and then brush the tops with your lipid of choice .
13) Bake at 350F for approx 20 minutes- the tops should be crunchy but not burned. - the oiled tins will crisp them all around.
14) Serve alongside nearly anything :)

Enjoy your holidays, all :)

deadsweetheart

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i dont beleive ive mentioend this however i was at a once a year 800 vendor flea market  called " the big flea" and there was a woman there who had german chocolate molds and one was a ww1 era zeppelin that came with seperate attachments for the gondolas and propellars,  it was  3 feet long and i think they said it took 65 ounces of chocolate to fill it. sadly it cost 600 dollars for that antiqie chocolate mold :(

costumemercenary

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Servitor Skull Cake. With working led-eyepiece. Was made for a housemate's birthday some time ago:

:




The Costume Mercenary presents the Dashing yet Practical Steampunk Coat, designed for gentle-person Inventors, sanity-impaired Scientists, Tech-Priests

J. Wilhelm

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For Miss Nitr0gene:
....etc........
....etc........
5 Mexican chorizo sausage links, browned
....etc.......



CapnHarlock:

You're talking like a Texan!  You speak my language!
How about an Amber or Bock-style beer for that?
« Last Edit: January 18, 2010, 10:53:23 am by J. Wilhelm »

deadsweetheart

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If your bored and have a little money to throw around and want a cooking conversation peice you should get yourself one of Vincent Price's cookbooks , he wrote 3 but only 2 are regularly available, " Come into the Kitchen " is actually a pretty good one and it gives american cuisenne history of sorts from colonial stuff to what was considered the present time of the publishing ( 1969), theres also " a Treasury of Great Recipes " which i dont have a copy of at the moment.   Avaiable on ebay occasionally are cd recordings of vincent actually teaching you how to cook things from all around the world and he also gives you back history of the meal and the region it comes form  thats called the "Beverly Hills Cookbook"  its actually an audio recording voiced by vincent himself, it comes in 2 volumes and i think one also has wine selection in it .

and before you ask yes this is the spooky vincent price from all the horror films and who was also eggman in the batman tv show. So its not some other guy named vincent price . Him and his wife mary  wrote these books . He also put out some art books too but that is for another thread.

I just think its funny to see my friends faces though when i tell them i have vincent price's cookbook.

metalotaku

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for the last steampunk picnic i went to i brought some spiced up gingerbread muffins

they were chocolate gingerbread rum muffins.

they were a big hit too. if anyone wants it i can give a recipie for it.