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Author Topic: Food! Food! Food! The Good, Bad, Ugly, and Tasty steampunk treats and drinks  (Read 83646 times)
Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #475 on: December 27, 2014, 04:40:05 am »

It's very easy to find maize flour, sold as "cornflour" in the UK; we use it as a thickener for gravies and sauces. In France it's most commonly know by the brand name of "Maizena".




 Its known as "corn flour" here in the antipodean colonies too.  


May I ask a question since you are at the Antipodes?  I has an Australian roommate who actually asked me whether we ate corn bread in the USA (I guess he didn't realise the origin of yellow cornbread- see link  Cheesy )

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cornbread

Naturally I said yes, but that has me thinking now... In the USA we separate corn starch (corn flour to you) from cornmeal as they are two different things.

Cornmeal is what we use for making cornbread.  Technically it is produced by grinding dry raw corn grains- similar as corn starch but the grain is far coarser

What do Brits and Antipoedian folk call their cornmeal??  According to wiki it is suggested that the word Polenta is used (like in Italian Polenta) - Is that right?  Although for us the word Polenta is only used for the finished Italian product...


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corn_starch
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cornmeal

And then there is the Mesomerican Masa dough, which is the product of "nixtamalised" corn kernels.  Processed corn kernels are also known as hominy or Nixtamal after pre-treating the grain with alkaline (or in USA, acid) substances to increase the nutritional content and allow for dough formation.  If the hominy is ground to a dough it is called Masa, and that is the ingredient for tortillas.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nixtamalization

I never realised that cornmeal had a serious nutritional deficiency.  I've heard stories of Italian and American farmers in the 19th C. getting sick of Pellagra over the consumption of Polenta or cornbread, or rather getting sick because of a lack of a particular nutrient (niacin), because some nutrients in corn are not released unless you chemically treat the corn to obtain the Nixtamal (hominy), but I just realised that if Polenta is basically the same as cornmeal, then American cornbread is just as deficient nutritionally. leaving the Nixtamal/hominy as the only nutritious form of corn.  BTW This nutritional deficiency may not apply to the cornstarch (cornflour in the UK), because it is a highly processed product

Hominy is just Nixtamalised corn kernels


If you grind the hominy/Nixtamal you end up with Masa -either dried in powdered form or wet, ready to make tortillas



 To my knowledge we do not have cornmeal. We just have  the flour.  I suspect the  rest of it may go into poultry mash.

 You may be able to get Polenta  in the  fancier shops with an added fancy price tag.
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« Reply #476 on: December 27, 2014, 05:44:11 pm »

Yes, polenta is basically the same, and to buy it here, it's basically buying at a premium - I'm not a fan of polenta in it's finished Italian form(s).  Cornbread is OK, but it's definitely much sweeter with yellow corn.  I don't know if the yellow corn has any nutritional advantage over white.  Yellow corn in Mexico is traditionally consumed "on the cob," which means we eat the first harvest of the year when the corn kernels are tender.  The rest gets canned or processed for Americal style cereal, oil, etc (middle quality harvests) and popcorn (the last harvest when the grains have a very thick pericarp).

In other news, today I had the loveliest breakfast.  Fried eggs with crumbled sharp cheddar cheese (a very hard sharp cheddar with Parmesan-like tones sold by "Trader Joe's". The cheese will liquify over the eggs if you put a lid on the pans.  Outstandingly delicious.
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« Reply #477 on: December 28, 2014, 10:38:19 pm »

I am quite interested in a steampunk explorer characterisation, in particular Indo-China, India, North Africa and Mars. The explorers to these countries were usually larger than life, often absorbed the local culture and surrounded themselves with exotic and interesting artifacts, thus providing plenty of material for a steampunk persona and environment. So, Boxing Day we had a North African feast! This is based largely on a recipe in Radio Times adapted to our tastes and facilities, augmented with a family favourite. It took me about two hours to do all the preparation but once that is done, it only requires bunging it in the oven and you can relax with your guests while it cooks or rests in the 'fridge. Feeds about 6 to 8 depending on appetites. Serve with natural yoghurt and fruit chutney.

Vegetable Strudel
Roast two aubergines and three whole peppers in oven (200C fan) for  25 minutes then add 8-10 cherry tomatoes and roast for a further 20 minutes. Remove tray and cover with cling film – leave to cool. Slice finely two large red onions and sweat in a little olive oil for 10mins. Add 2tbsp light brown sugar and 2tbsp balsamic vinegar and heat for a further 10 minutes reducing until it is dark and sticky – allow to cool. Cover 100gms cous-cous and one vegetable stock cube by 2cms with boiling water. Stir, cover and set aside until all water is absorbed and allow to cool. Peel aubergines and peppers and shred into strips. Reserve any juice from roasted vegetables.
Assemble filling by forking over cous-cous in a large bowl – add onions with any excess vinegar – mix well. Add 2tbsp ras el hanout spice mix, one large red chilli, de-seeded and finely chopped, a small bunch of coriander – finely chopped, with a good pinch of freshly ground pepper and mix together.
Lay out a 5 x 2 matrix of filo pastry sheets on a clean table cloth. Paint with 70gms of melted butter. Layer the cous-cous/onion mix, aubergines and pepper strips and tomatoes with 300gms crumbled feta cheese. Roll up the strudel using the table cloth, tucking the ends in as each pair of sheets are included into the roll. Finally roll out directly onto a suitable baking tray. Pierce top, glaze and bake at 180C fan for 50 mins – 1 hr.

Chicken Tagine
Cut two or three chicken breasts into strips and marinade in 2 heaped tsp of rose harissa paste in a suitable casserole dish, stir and set aside in ‘fridge for 30mins – 1 hr. Heat some oil in a frying pan and fork the pieces of chicken into the pan and seal. Return chicken to casserole dish. Lightly fry a finely sliced white onion in the same frying pan, three crushed and finely chopped garlic cloves and then add half a can of chopped tomatoes with the juice. Add a good handful of roughly chopped dried apricots, the reserved pepper juices from the strudel and a few slices of preserved lemon. Add to the casserole making up any liquid needed with a splash of white wine. Stir, cover and cook at 180C fan for 40 – 50 mins.

Salad
Soak 50gms raisins in orange juice, chill. Grate 5 large carrots into a bowl and add two oranges, peeled and segmented. Toast 25gms flaked almonds, set aside. Chop a small handful of coriander and add to the carrot/orange mix with the almonds, raisins and orange juice. Stir together gently with 4 tbsp extra virgin olive oil, salt and pepper to taste and chill until ready to serve.
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« Reply #478 on: February 01, 2015, 05:27:07 am »

I am quite interested in a steampunk explorer characterisation, in particular Indo-China, India, North Africa and Mars.

Which of these recipes belongs to Martian cuisine? Are the ingredients hard to get here on Earth? Grin
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« Reply #479 on: February 01, 2015, 06:52:47 am »

Unless you are referring to Mt. Olympus Aubergine.  I find that Martian aubergines fight back very hard with their claws and sharp teeth, so I tend to avoid them whenever I can. Additional note: for American readers, aubergine = eggplant.

Personally, I'm a fan of Venusian Lobsters.  Much more docile and much leaner, owing to the fact they are fractal creatures.
« Last Edit: February 01, 2015, 06:57:21 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #480 on: February 01, 2015, 09:50:01 am »

Yes, it is the eggplant - most edible things on Mars seem to be purple and the trick is to eat them before they eat you. The simplest plan is to attack them from behind, then slice them cleanly off the plant straight into a vacuum packing bag before they know what is happening. Of course, the difficult part (all simple plans have difficult parts...) is to know which is their front and back! I usually pay my local supermarket blood money and have them take care of all the icky bits.

I am guessing red cabbage also came from Mars...

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« Reply #481 on: February 22, 2015, 06:59:35 am »

Luftschiff Brötchen und Cloudbrot (Admiral Wilhelm's own invention)

The Luftschiff Brötchen or Airship Rolls, are a type of filled sausage sandwich prepared among the Bavarian crewfolk known as the Luftschiffengel who serve around the world on military Airships

Luftschiffelgel Definition: http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,20391.msg916296.html#msg916296

Background History: http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,20391.msg923528.html#msg923528

The bread is similar to an "American Biscuit," in that it is more a type of savoury bread than a sweet bread. Sometimes the bread alone is known as Wolkenbrot or Cloudbrot (Cloud Bread), because of its unusual spongy nature.

To make Cloudbrot, all you need to do is dry-mix 50% all purpose wheat flour and 50% buttermilk pancake mix - the type that only requires water and nothing else. This is a "no-knead" type bread, so there is no period for rising and in fact you will use a large wooden spoon to prepare the dough.  You mix the flour mix with a pinch of cracked black pepper and salt to taste, and using a wooden spoon add water until it coalesces into a single mass made of sticky dough - so the dough is wet enough to stick to everything, but otherwise rather dense and unkneaded.

For a large roll (2 servings) use 1/3 cup of flour and 1/3 cup pancake flour, preferably using Buttermilk pancake flour and with 1/2 teaspoon of crushed pepper and similar of Kosher salt. Sprinkle plenty of flour onto a baking sheet and place the dough in the centre of the sheet and sprinkle plenty of flour on top.  Do not be afraid to use a lot of dry flour - the dough is very sticky and you will need all the "dust" you can to keep the bun from sticking and in shape.

Bread alone with no filling: Wolkenbrot / Cloudbrot

A suggestion is a rectangular shape for the bun. After the (2-serving) bun is shaped on the baking sheet, place a slice of butter on top of the bread and bake in a 420F / 215C oven for 8-10 minutes or until the top is golden brown.

Filled bread Sandwich: Luftschiff Brötchen

Flatten a two-serving portion of Cloudbrot on a baking sheet.  Flatten into a rectangular pancake wide enough to fit two (20 cm-long, 2cm dia) links of sausage, leaving a 1 cm gap between the two links.  The idea is to completely wrap the two sausage links in the Cloudbrot and use the gap between the sausages to introduce a sauce, cheese or sauerkraut.

A suggestion is to fill the gap between the sausage links with a slice of cream cheese and a generous streak of horseradish brown mustard. Close the package by stretching two "flaps" of the Clodbrot pancake (Brötchen) on top of the sausage and filling.  Use a bit of water and pinch the bread on top and the ends to make a perfectly sealed pocket.  Put two pats of butter (1/8 teaspoon salted butter) on top of the Brötchen before baking

Bake at 420F / 215C for 10-12 minutes or until the top is golden brown.

EDIT: There are some variants to those recipe.  Most notably there is one which uses Mozzarella cheese and Bolognese and even Marinara sauce among the Luftschiffengel from the Italian-speaking region of Ticino and in the southern part of Graubünden (Canton Grigioni).  
« Last Edit: February 23, 2015, 02:23:19 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #482 on: February 22, 2015, 03:31:47 pm »

I fear it is time I confessed, to my eternal shame, that I much prefer a cup of hot cocoa ( half a cup of hot milk, a half teaspoon of cocoa powder, a half teaspoon of Stevia sweetener, a dash of cinnamon, and boiling water) to tea.

Naturally I feel terribly embarrassed by this, and wonder if I shall be required to foreit my Steampunking license.
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« Reply #483 on: February 22, 2015, 07:50:01 pm »

I fear it is time I confessed, to my eternal shame, that I much prefer a cup of hot cocoa ( half a cup of hot milk, a half teaspoon of cocoa powder, a half teaspoon of Stevia sweetener, a dash of cinnamon, and boiling water) to tea.

Naturally I feel terribly embarrassed by this, and wonder if I shall be required to foreit my Steampunking license.


We shall have to review your standing at the Steampunk Council. Otherwise there are a number of exotic beverage recipes involving cocoa on this thread.
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« Reply #484 on: February 23, 2015, 01:56:11 am »

I fear it is time I confessed, to my eternal shame, that I much prefer a cup of hot cocoa ( half a cup of hot milk, a half teaspoon of cocoa powder, a half teaspoon of Stevia sweetener, a dash of cinnamon, and boiling water) to tea.

Naturally I feel terribly embarrassed by this, and wonder if I shall be required to foreit my Steampunking license.


I believe that Chocolate Shops & Coffee Houses BOTH predated Tea Shops in London.  Lloyd's of London got its start in a Coffee House, by the way.
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« Reply #485 on: February 23, 2015, 05:06:56 am »

I fear it is time I confessed, to my eternal shame, that I much prefer a cup of hot cocoa ( half a cup of hot milk, a half teaspoon of cocoa powder, a half teaspoon of Stevia sweetener, a dash of cinnamon, and boiling water) to tea.

Naturally I feel terribly embarrassed by this, and wonder if I shall be required to foreit my Steampunking license.



I believe that Chocolate Shops & Coffee Houses BOTH predated Tea Shops in London.  Lloyd's of London got its start in a Coffee House, by the way.


I'm not sure about the veracity of all these details in the article below ("rainforrests of Central and South America" is a little vague - the actual oldest remains are in Mexico and the Caribbean).  Either way, it is true that Cocoa are native to the Americas and the first cocoa exchange and invention of chocolate proper (with sugar) happened in Mexico.  By 1570 chcolate had arrived to Spain.  By the 1600's the first chocolate houses were opened in England:


http://www.history.org/history/teaching/enewsletter/volume9/jan11/featurearticle.cfm

Quote
A method for making a chocolate drink was written in 1769 in The Experienced English Housekeeper:
 "Scrape four ounces of chocolate and pour a quart of boiling water upon it; mix it well and sweeten it to your taste; give it a boil and let it stand all night; then mix it again very well; boil it in two minutes, then mix it till it will leave the froth upon the tops of your cups."
« Last Edit: February 23, 2015, 05:09:19 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #486 on: April 02, 2015, 06:48:55 am »

Next project:

Roasted Strawberry-Chipotle BBQ Sauce. (Chipotle: sauce made from roasted Ancho or Jalapeno Chiles in vinegar)

 Has anybody done something similar?  There is a ton of very large strawberries at my local super, on sale at $1/lb, which will probably disappear within the next 24 hours. I've already bought and consumed 2lbs in the last couple of days, but I need to preserve the falvour as they are going out of season, and won't see them fresh later on.

I was thinking something like this:

Roasted Strawberry BBQ Sauce, by Kevin Lynch

http://www.closetcooking.com/2013/05/roasted-strawberry-bbq-sauce.html

A sweet, spicy and smoky strawberry BBQ sauce

Servings: 2 cups
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 45 minutes

Ingredients
 4 cups strawberries, hulled (if they are large cut them in half)
 1/2 cup ketchup
 2 tablespoons maple syrup
 2 tablespoons strawberry preserves/jam
 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
 2 tablespoons soy sauce
 1 chipotle chili in adobo, chopped
 1 tablespoon garlic, grated
 1 tablespoon ginger, grated
 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
 1 teaspoon dijon mustard
 2 tablespoons cilantro, chopped
Directions
 Place the strawberries in a single layer on a baking pan lined with foil folded up on the sides to capture the juices and roast in a preheated 425F oven until they start to caramelize, about 15-20 minutes.
 Bring everything except the cilantro to a boil, reduce the heat, simmer for 15 minutes, remove from heat, mix in the cilantro and puree in a food processor or blender or using an immersion blender.
Option: Add 4 slices of cooked and crumbled bacon.

Also thinking of the very similar Strawberry Balsamic Vinaigrette, and perhaps trying to avoid using Strawberry jam or preserves... Any suggestions for a mostly natural (or made from scratch) equivalent?

Ingredients
 1 package (16 ounces) frozen unsweetened strawberries, thawed
 6 tablespoons lemon juice
 1/4 cup sugar
 2 tablespoons cider vinegar
 2 tablespoons olive oil
 1/8 teaspoon poppy seeds

« Last Edit: April 04, 2015, 09:40:48 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #487 on: April 04, 2015, 09:41:04 am »

I have reproduced the Strawberry Chipotle BBQ Sauce with excellent results, and used 4 cups of strawberries, but I have simplified the recipe as follows:

4 cups strawberries (fresh)
1/2 cup Tomato Ketchup
200 grams of Chipotle peppers in Adobo. Chipotle (Chilpotle) peppers are fire-roasted Jalapeno or Ancho peppers cured in vinegar and a tomato-powdered chile sauce called Adobo  (The recipe is adjusted as a very "hot" sauce with about 5 Chiles - 2 inches long, reduce to one chile for a mild sauce).  Outside of the Americas, look at Indian cuisine or Thai hot chile curries to get that "smoky and spicy taste.  Without the smokiness and heat, the sauce will simply be too sweet to be a BBQ sauce.
Worcestershire sauce 2.5 tablespons.
Honey 2 tablespoons
1 Small shallot, minced finely
2 tablespoons sugar
1/3 cup of water

Recipe yields about 3-4 cups of sauce

Chop the strawberries finely, and mince the shallot, then add all the ingredients above. Boil for 30 minutes or until all the fruit is soft and mashed into the sauce, trying to mash the strawberry pieces while stirring.  Protect your skin, as the mixture boils at a significantly hotter temperature than the boiling temperature of water.  At the end it should have the consistency of regular BBQ sauce with slight chunkiness from the fruit.  The "heat" of the pepper is very high in this recipe.  The spiciness actually is reduced with heat so it will be extraordinarily spicy at the beginning of the boiling process after adding the peppers into the pot, and the heat will be reduced after 1/2 hour of boiling.  When using the BBQ sauce to baste meat over fire, the sauce will become even less spicy and more pleasantly caramelised in flavour, so you have to reserve some fresh sauce on the side to baste on top of the meat when serving.
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« Reply #488 on: April 05, 2015, 08:39:50 am »

This is my family's tradition for Easter Sunday or a Spring festivity:

Cook (or buy) 1 lb whole Asparagus spears
Hard boil several eggs, one half per person
Buy one jar or can of long hearts of palm
Get powdered paprika or red chile powder
Have plenty of mayonnaise ready at hand

Cut the hearts of palm in one inch pieces and stand them up vertically on each plate. Arrange several spears of asparagus next to the heart of palm cylinders and place a generous dollop of mayonnaise in the center of the plate.  Don't be shy with the amount.  Cut the hard boiled eggs in halves lengthwise an place with flat side up over the mayonnaise.  Sprinkle with paprika or red chile powder.  The egg symbolizes re-birth or renewal.
« Last Edit: April 05, 2015, 09:34:51 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #489 on: April 05, 2015, 10:29:22 pm »

Great Easter Pork Improvisational

As the title reads, this is an wanton, impromptu, and random act of cooking on this day of Easter. So I shall report to you as I prepare this meal.

Yesterday, upon receiving notice that my local super was going to shut doors this Easter Sunday (the confluence of Passover and Easter means most patrons will not be out and about this weekend), I decided to purchase 2.33 lbs of rough shoulder pork cutlets (known as "carnitas" in Mexican lingo).  I also had an excess of very large strawberries available ($1/lb), due to perhaps a late Strawberry season.

So I debated how to prepare this and I decided that I would use the last batch of 3/4 lb of nearly over-ripe  strawberries.  I also had one small whole yellow onion in my refrigerator that had been sitting there for ages and various spices in my cabinet.

So what I just did to day was take a large pot and brown the pork in 1/3 cup (5.33 fl Oz) of olive oil and one tablespoon of Kosher salt (this can be adjusted at the end), adding a whole yellow onion, cut in large haphazard pieces.  Once the pork had browned thoroughly and there was a thick film of brown deliciousness on the bottom of the pan, I poured 4 cups of water, 1/3 cup of red wine, 1 Oz of lemon juice, one tablespoon of Lea and Perrins Worcestershire sauceand, and I added 1 tablespoon of crushed dry oregano.  Increased the heat to max, and brought back to a boil, and then lowered the heat to med-low to allow the pot to simmer.

More or less following this recipe:
http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/carnitas-braised-and-fried-pork-364389

And that is where I am right now.  I'm still improvising how to end this dish. Should it end up roasted in the oven with all the liquid gone?  Or should I iomprovise a sauce from the stew itself?  I still don't know.  I'm just about 1/2 hr. into the cooking process, and honestly the stock inside looks delicious as a stew alone! I can smell  the pork, the onion, olive oil and oregano already, so as soon as the pork is "pull-apart" tender, I'll have to make a choice whether to reduce the remaining liquid in the pot, and by how much...

I do have however quite a bit of leftover of the Strawberry-Chipotle chile BBQ sauce, and that gives me some ideas...  Any suggestions?

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
EDIT:
So the meal has come an gone...

For those interested, this is how I finished the dish:

After 1.5 hrs of boiling, I removed the meat and put it aside.  The meat should almost fall apart with a fork.  There were at least 2 cups of liquid left over that would by itself make a great soup if you added vegetables or perhaps a base for a gravy, but I decided to take my Strawberry Chipotle BBQ sauce (see above post ) and added too heaping tablespoons to it and then bringing it to a hard boil, further reduced the sauce to 50% volume - enough to pour over the meat.  You might have to let it settle for an hour as the fat from the pok and olive oil will separatem and this is your chance to skim off a good 10 tablespoons of un-needed grease (it is pork after all!).

Rhe sauce was now thicker and had a bit of spice to it. The taste on the meat is insanely good.  I guess a similar result could be obtained with Strawberry Jam and a mix of chili powder...  Eithjer way, the latter is important to bring some zest to the sauce, because without it it's basically a very "French" taste in my opinion.  Really good, but a tad bland for what I had envisioned (unless of course you want a pork plus vegetable soup).  The chipotle peppers and the sweetness of the BBQ sauce fix that along as acting as a thickener

So these are the ingredients:

2.33 lbs of pork shoulder cutlets or cubes 1.5 - 2 inches in size
One small yellow onion
1/3 cup of olive oil
1 tablespoon of Kosher salt
1 tablespoon of crushed pepper
1 tablespoon of dry crushed oregano
1 tablespoon of Lea and Perrins Worcestershire sauce
1 Oz of lemon juice
5 very large strawberries  (about 3/4 lb)
1/3 cup of red wine (Pinot Grigio)
Two tablespoons of Strawberry Chipotle BBQ sauce (see recipe in post above)


« Last Edit: April 06, 2015, 01:15:42 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #490 on: December 07, 2015, 12:42:00 am »

No posts since April. Have the members of this forum stopped eating?
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« Reply #491 on: December 07, 2015, 06:10:33 am »

No posts since April. Have the members of this forum stopped eating?

Do you think we've fasted long enough?


At the moment, eating Rice and Beans, handmade tortillas (yes, made by me), and washing it down with Shiner Bock beer.
« Last Edit: December 07, 2015, 06:12:53 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #492 on: December 13, 2015, 07:31:43 pm »

No posts since April. Have the members of this forum stopped eating?

Do you think we've fasted long enough?


At the moment, eating Rice and Beans, handmade tortillas (yes, made by me), and washing it down with Shiner Bock beer.

If the tortillas are made of corn (maize in Europe) rather than flour, that is actually a nutritionally balanced meal.
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« Reply #493 on: December 14, 2015, 01:53:25 am »

No posts since April. Have the members of this forum stopped eating?

Do you think we've fasted long enough?


At the moment, eating Rice and Beans, handmade tortillas (yes, made by me), and washing it down with Shiner Bock beer.

If the tortillas are made of corn (maize in Europe) rather than flour, that is actually a nutritionally balanced meal.

I'm not sure how balanced that was, but it was tasty. The point was to get the real hominy taste of fresh tortillas.  I mash some fresh avocado, add lime juice and salsa for an impromptu guacamole.  Toast the tortillas in the oven for tostadas without the grease.
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« Reply #494 on: December 14, 2015, 07:45:36 am »

This being avocado season, I've been purchasing a few avocados per week.  I discovered that they are an excellent garnish for tomato-based pasta.  Cut them up over the freshly made pasta and sauce and ass a dash of rock salt and a sprinkle of your favourite hot sauce.  Really excellent. I guess the reason is that it goes well together with other vegetables from the New World, such as tomatoes and chiles.

I wonder... what is the availability and usage of avocado on the other side of the pond?

Wiki: Avocado

Quote
The avocado (Persea americana) is a tree native to Mexico and Central America,[2] classified in the flowering plant family Lauraceae along with cinnamon, camphor and bay laurel. Avocado or alligator pear also refers to the fruit, botanically a large berry that contains a single seed.[3]
Avocados are commercially valuable and are cultivated in tropical and Mediterranean climates throughout the world. They have a green-skinned, fleshy body that may be pear-shaped, egg-shaped, or spherical. Commercially, they ripen after harvesting. Avocado trees are partially self-pollinating and often are propagated through grafting to maintain a predictable quality and quantity of the fruit.

*snip*

The oldest evidence of avocado use was found in a cave located in Coxcatlán, Puebla, Mexico, that dates to around 10,000 BC. The avocado tree also has a long history of cultivation in Central and South America, likely beginning as early as 5,000 BC.[4] A water jar shaped like an avocado, dating to AD 900, was discovered in the pre-Incan city of Chan Chan.[8] The earliest known written account of the avocado in Europe is that of Martín Fernández de Enciso (circa 1470–1528) in 1519 in his book, Suma De Geographia Que Trata De Todas Las Partidas Y Provincias Del Mundo.[9][10] The first written record in English of the use of the word 'avocado' was by Hans Sloane in a 1696 index of Jamaican plants. The plant was introduced to Indonesia in 1750, Brazil in 1809, South Africa and Australia in the late 1800s, and the Levant in 1908.

*snip*

The word "avocado" comes from the Spanish aguacate, which in turn comes from the Nahuatl word āhuacatl [aːˈwakat͡ɬ],[11] which goes back to the proto-Aztecan *pa:wa which also meant "avocado."

*snip*
In other Central American and Caribbean Spanish-speaking countries, it is known by the Mexican name, while South American Spanish-speaking countries use a Quechua-derived word, palta. In Portuguese, it is abacate. The fruit is sometimes called an avocado pear or alligator pear (due to its shape and the rough green skin of some cultivars). The Nahuatl ahuacatl can be compounded with other words, as in ahuacamolli, meaning avocado soup or sauce, from which the Spanish word guacamole derives

In the United Kingdom, the term avocado pear is still used as applied when avocados first became commonly available in the 1960s.[17] It is known as butter fruit in parts of India and goes by the name "" [ɓʌː] in Vietnamese, which is the same word that is used for butter.[18] In eastern China, it is known as è lí ("alligator pear") or huángyóu guǒ ("butter fruit"). In Taiwan, it is known as luò lí or "cheese pear"
« Last Edit: December 14, 2015, 08:02:55 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #495 on: December 14, 2015, 08:38:13 am »

From Wiki: Guacamole

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On July 2, 2013, the New York Times published a guacamole recipe that included the addition of English peas.[5] Two years later, on July 1, 2015, the newspaper posted a link to the article on Twitter account with the caption, "Add green peas to your guacamole. Trust us."[6] The post sparked overwhelmingly negative feedback from their readers and followers, which prompted the media to pick-up on the story,[7] calling the incident "Guacamolegate."[8] Even President Barack Obama weighed in, tweeting that—while he respected the newspaper—peas didn't belong in guacamole

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« Reply #496 on: December 14, 2015, 08:43:09 am »

eggplant parm. love it. corn meal= corn bread.
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« Reply #497 on: December 14, 2015, 09:34:15 am »

eggplant parm. love it. corn meal= corn bread.

You should note as well: cornmeal is actually referred to as Polenta in Europe (because of its usage in Italy). And Eggplant is called Aubergine in UK and France and Melanzane in Italy.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/8b/Melanzane_alla_Parmigiana.jpg/250px-Melanzane_alla_Parmigiana.jpg.

Aubergine/Melanzane Parmigiana:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parmigiana
« Last Edit: December 14, 2015, 09:39:38 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #498 on: December 27, 2015, 03:30:33 pm »

No posts since April. Have the members of this forum stopped eating?

Do you think we've fasted long enough?


At the moment, eating Rice and Beans, handmade tortillas (yes, made by me), and washing it down with Shiner Bock beer.

If the tortillas are made of corn (maize in Europe) rather than flour, that is actually a nutritionally balanced meal.

I'm not sure how balanced that was, but it was tasty. The point was to get the real hominy taste of fresh tortillas.  I mash some fresh avocado, add lime juice and salsa for an impromptu guacamole.  Toast the tortillas in the oven for tostadas without the grease.

Balanced AND tasty!  Your guacamole sounds very good, too.
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« Reply #499 on: December 27, 2015, 11:31:17 pm »

Yes, avocado are widely available in the UK and are very popular, particularly amongst vegetarians and vegans.

So, Christmas Eve was a pig-feast! A roasted ham, slow roast pork belly, black pudding stuffing and pigs in blankets made with proper sausages and dry cure streaky bacon. Grossly underestimated the salt content - blood pressure settling down now...

I brined the pork belly (nb to my trans Atlantic cuz it wasn't a whole belly, just 700gms or so). Now I had read about brining but this was my first attempt. Equal quantities salt and soft brown sugar dissolved in enough water to cover, plus some flavourings - black peppercorns, mace and bay leaves. I left the meat to soak in the liquid in the 'fridge for about 24 hours. Drained it and rinsed the joint several times in fresh water. Roasted about 3 hours at 130C fan. Ate really well and my 7 year old grand daughter, who is not old enough to have too many food prejudices yet, was pretty enthusiastic about it! The mace and sugar certainly added something. This will be repeated.

Now, a question - are black beans any different to navy beans or cannellini for example? I have found a recipe which is, to me, little more than a glorified baked beans!
Chop a medium onion finely and soften in a little oil. Add a couple of similarly chopped garlic cloves. Add one and a half tablespoons of ground cumin and similar amount of paprika. A couple of teaspoons of sugar - stir in and cook for another minute - add 1 x 400 gm can of chopped tomatoes (I use whole canned tomatoes and then roughly chop them in the pan - I like some lumps in mine!) and cook down for 10 minutes or so. Then add a 400gm can of black beans, rinsed and continue cooking for another 10 minutes or until you need them! As with most tomato / paprika dishes, it seems to improve in richness by letting it cook more. Adjust seasoning before serving. We repeated this dish for my vegetarian son and I have no doubt it will become a regular.

My very best wishes to everybody that the new year will be kind to you.

Ffitz
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