Author Topic: Food! Food! Food! The Good, Bad, Ugly, and Tasty steampunk treats and drinks  (Read 138085 times)

Dr. Madd

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Ok, Gents- How do you like your hot dogs?
What do we want? Decapitations!

Archibald_Broce

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I have a marvelous contraption called a Hot Diggity Dogger. The franks and buns slip into metal slots, and they are cooked in a way similar to a toaster. There is a dial that ranges from rare to well done, and when the hot dogs pop up, you will also have toasty buns to hold them in. At this juncture, I have not found a better way to cook them, aside from perhaps barbeque..
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Avanti, Avanti!

Dr. Madd

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I need me one of those.

CapnHarlock

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I am not the greatest fan of "regular old" hot dogs, but a friend recently introduced me to a rather-marvelous version called a "Sonoran Hot Dog"  (apparently became popular in the Mexican State of Sonora, and then re-crossed into her home US State of Arizona)

Take a good natural skin beef/pork hot dog, wrap it in bacon, then cook it on a flattop griddle until thoroughly done. Place on a toasted roll with yellow mustard,  a very-lightly-dressed shredded cabbage slaw, tomato-onion-jalapeno salsa (or pico de gallo), a couple thin slices of avocado and top with mayonnaise.

It tastes infinitely better than is sounds :)
Jeremiah Cornelius Harlock
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Dr. Madd

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For me, its saurkraut, spicy mustard and onions.

CapnHarlock

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Now, if (in the states, anyway) you can find an artisanal bratwurst whose name doesn't sound like a rude 'sausage' joke, try simmering them in lager beer and diced onions - when 'nearly done", grill until the skin is a bit crispy, top with spicy brown mustard, the drained onions and sauerkraut that has never seen a tin can. "Good Eats" :)

Dr. Madd

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Those are good.. I get something similar at Oktoberfest

Archibald_Broce

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I haven't ventured into many "gourmet" versions of hot dogs. I don't enjoy most relishes or heaps of onions on any food, for that matter. Usually, mustard & ketchup is all I need. However, chili dogs are also splendid.

Birdnest

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For us, it's German Brand sausages fried (sort of) on a flat iron with a touch of olive oil.  Then, said meaty goodness is placed on a whole wheat bun (there is a regional bakery 'round here with really good buns).  Garnish with yellow mustard, tomatoes, spear dill pickles and diced red onions.  Served with sweet potato fries (chips for our UK folk).

Round off the event with a full bodied ale (IPA, NWPA or Irish Red).  Our local brewery has a few options such as an unfiltered, hoppy red ale at around 8.5% ... very red with a nice white head.

Onward ho!

Guinevere Meander

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Ahh..Wiener-Dogs!
I mix reg catsup with hotsauce, then put mustard on steamed bun, add the dog, catsup, shredded cheddar and diced red onions......step away from the Lady....grin
"...it was here just a minute ago!"  Motto of the lovely Lady Guinevere Meander

Dr. Madd

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I also am a huge devotee of Currywurst. Those BG members from Germany know what I speak of. I've made my own recipe for it.

Archibald_Broce

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I also am a huge devotee of Currywurst. Those BG members from Germany know what I speak of. I've made my own recipe for it.

I'm intrigued. Elaborate on this concotion, good sir?

Dr. Madd

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Invented in the British zone of Berlin in the aftermath of WW2. A german housewife traded some alcohol to some British troops for curry powder, ketchup and worcestershire sauce. Mixing these into a sauce, she served it atop pork sausages and sold them on the streets of Berlin, and made a good living. Sadly, she took the recipe to the grave, and it had to be reverse engineered. My own formula uses kielbasa, and I mix Ketchup, curry powder, garlic, paprika and onion powder, and worcestershire when I have it, and microwave it for no more than 45 seconds. fry your sausage up and pour sauce over it. I like mine on a bun.

Archibald_Broce

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That sounds delicious. I should have all those components at home already; aside from the sausage. I'll have to pick some up.

Guinevere Meander

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In Germany, they are traditionally cut into bite-sized pieces and served with french fries in an 'oval" paperbowl with a little plastic or wooden fork (3 pronged). In some areas, the french fries get served as "Pommes Schranke" meaning with mayo and ketchup (as the rail-road crossing bars are striped red and white...Ah...sweet memories from my country of origin ;D

CapnHarlock

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This is quite an interesting coincidence - my current 'sideline obsession' is making homemade sausage - (a very good cajun boudin blanc, and a decent andouille, so far) . I am currently brining a boned pork shoulder and some salt pork in beer, salt and black pepper prior to grinding - some curry-spices might be an excellent addition

Guinevere Meander

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Hi CapnHarlock! I already saved 6 of your posted recipes...You are my kind of "foodie".

Dr. Madd

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This is quite an interesting coincidence - my current 'sideline obsession' is making homemade sausage - (a very good cajun boudin blanc, and a decent andouille, so far) . I am currently brining a boned pork shoulder and some salt pork in beer, salt and black pepper prior to grinding - some curry-spices might be an excellent addition

Can I PM you? I need to pick your brain concerning sausages.

Angus A Fitziron

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Can I PM you? I need to pick your brain concerning sausages.

When someone calling themselves Dr.Madd writes this - it has a strange kind of foreboding ring...


...brainz...
Airship Artificer, part-time romantik and amateur Natural Philosopher

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CapnHarlock

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Quote
Can I PM you? I need to pick your brain concerning sausages.

Certainly, Sir :)

Atlas Fishard

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Has the topic of asian steam (bbq) bun been expanded yet?

If not I would love to contribute :)

With Regards,
A

Cordelia Forward

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Mr Fishard I am very interested in your take on an asian steam bun (yum!) Meanwhile here are three things I made for a Steampunk Party. I tried to do sort of Dickensian food with a twist.
Stout, Beef and Oyster pies
Victorian Sandwich Cake with Candied Squid



Lime, Mint and Avocado Cheesecake

Hope this works, I havent posted images before.
Tea Vicar? or shall we crack open another Sherry?

Atlas Fishard

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Mr Fishard I am very interested in your take on an asian steam bun (yum!) Meanwhile here are three things I made for a Steampunk Party. I tried to do sort of Dickensian food with a twist.
Stout, Beef and Oyster pies
Victorian Sandwich Cake with Candied Squid



Lime, Mint and Avocado Cheesecake

Hope this works, I havent posted images before.


Of course, dear. Here some basics for the pork buns.

Normally if you're in china, you can almost order any "pork buns" from any chinese restaurant,

There are a variety of pork buns in the world today, some baked, some vegan, some frozen for easy cooking, and some are made from scratch and steamed traditionally
E.g. Chinese pork buns and Japanese pork buns

( There's another version of the steam bun except it's used as a dessert, rather than a side dish/main course. )
( It's a basically custard in the middle with yellow food colored bun, steamed in the same way. My personal all-time-favorite for asian food )

Now before getting into more of the cooking part, I want to let you know what to expect taking your first bite out of these delicious delicacy:

It's a steamed warm fluffy bun, with hot/warm sauteed pork in asian bbq sause ( almost like terayaki sauce, depending on culture )
It's a lot like eating a hamburger, except the flavor is twice as good, and it's a savory experience to die for.


Rather than writing out long recipes and pictures for incoheriant understanding of this kind of food.

Here's a couple of video made by someone else for much easier viewing pleasure.

How to make the whole Pork Bun
How to make the roasted pork for the bun
how to make the dough for the bun

I'm not sure as to my experience in cooking vs. your experience in cooking,
so please let me know if you have any questions and such that you are not familiar with.

With Regards,
A
« Last Edit: April 25, 2011, 12:25:35 pm by Atlas Fishard »

Cordelia Forward

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Mr Fishard thank you for that, they look delicious and the videos explain the process very well – I love the way her fingers bend backwards! I can make Samosas so it shouldn’t be too hard to make the buns though I will need to buy one of those bamboo steamers.
I was amused by your comment about them being a 'fluffy bun' because it reminded me that in the Philippines I was once served a ‘Fluffy Mamon’ (which I had to google when I got home) - it is more like a muffin but I really liked the name especially as they billed it as being 'from the Mamon Collection' and it made me wonder what other types there were...smooth?.....prickly?

Cordelia

Atlas Fishard

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I'd imagine if it was a bun that's: ( center filling or just the bread itself :) )

Spicy = prickly
Baked = crunchy
Creamy = smooth
Caramelized = sweetened
Sour = Lemon drops/sour punch

Well, these would be my glossary for food anyways :)

Regards,
A