Author Topic: Food! Food! Food! The Good, Bad, Ugly, and Tasty steampunk treats and drinks  (Read 138084 times)

Athanor

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Some years ago I was cruising among the islands of the British Columbia coast with a mining exploration charter party aboard my 48ft 1929-built classic wooden powerboat "Spartan III", and one day we ran out of bread, far from the nearest grocery store. However we did have flour and oats aboard, but no oven, so I tried an experiment.

About 2 cups of wholegrain flour, about the same quantity of oats, a teaspoon or so of salt, a tablespoon of baking powder, a tablespoon or thereabouts of brown sugar, mix well. Chop in about 1/2lb butter so that the chunks are about 1/8" or so. Add a couple of eggs and enough water to make a dough; I had some vanilla essence so I added a generous glug of that too.

Place in your biggest frying pan, suitably oiled, fry one side and then flip over and give it about equal time on the other side; make sure it cooks all the way through (prod it with a knife; if the knife comes out clean, it's done). Serve hot with butter and maple syrup, or with bacon, eggs, sausages or whatever you have.

Since it turned out something between a pancake and an American biscuit (probably an English scone comes close), we started out calling it panscuit, later in deference to the name of the vessel it became Spartanbread. Everyone seemed to like it; certainly it disapeared quickly, and the crew urged me to make more on other occasions, even when bread was available.

I decided, after a while though, that what I had actually done was re-invent bannock. When I returned home I tried baking a similar mixture in the oven, and it turned out successfully, but different; more scone-like.

This is a very flexible recipe; Depending on what I had available, I've sometimes substituted Aunt Jemima's Pancake Mix for flour,and crunched-up cornflakes for oats. I suppose you could add raisins, blueberries or Cheddar cheese if you wanted.

It also goes down nicely with smoked or baked salmon.
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Auntie Ludmilla

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Sounds like a variant of the traditional Derbyshire oatcake. These are very different from Scottiish oatcakes (a small, hard biscuit), being a large spongy pancake make from oatmeal. They are fried up and served either sweet (with treacle, syrup or butter) or savory (as part of an English fried breakfast, with sausage, bacon, eggs, black pudding etc) One of my favourite things, although being vegetarian I usually eat mine with garlic mushrooms and cheese. Yum!
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Athanor

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Auntie Ludmilla, I have to confess that, despite being born right next door in Cheshire, living there on and off for over 20 years, and having visited Derbyshire on many occasions, I've never come across a Derbyshire oatcake!! - but I have to say it sounds very much like the stuff I thought I had "invented"!! Just shows to go you.....

I've made it several times for potlucks (which, since several of my friends and acquaintances are also vegetarians, often seem to consist almost entirely of salads), and there were never any leftovers, - so now at last I know what to call it....

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A lovely bottle of Camp.

J. Wilhelm

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Some years ago I was cruising among the islands of the British Columbia coast...About 2 cups of wholegrain flour, about the same quantity of oats, a teaspoon or so of salt, a tablespoon of baking powder, a tablespoon or thereabouts of brown sugar, mix well. Chop in about 1/2lb butter so that the chunks are about 1/8" or so. Add a couple of eggs and enough water to make a dough; I had some vanilla essence so I added a generous glug of that too....Since it turned out something between a pancake and an American biscuit (probably an English scone comes close), we started out calling it panscuit, later in deference to the name of the vessel it became Spartanbread.

Sounds very similar to something I also " invented" a 50-50% ratio of instant oats and all purpose flour with sugar, cinnamon, and 1/2 teaspoon of baking powder per 1.5-2 cups, but no eggs.  It bakes rather fluffy at 375 F in the oven, and curiously I think the oats are changing the chemistry from what would otherwise be a traditional soda bread.  Somehow they make the bread softer yet it's slighly more compact than soda bread...

I made these out of sheer poverty, as much of my cooking came about from not being able to buy made foods! So I took the scientific approach...

I have intentionally experimented with flour and butter, shortening, plain water, and egg in different permutations, and varying the ratios, just to "learn" the chemistry of baking!  So far I've "re-invented" the wheel as far as soda bread, pizza bread, butter cookies (bisquits in the UK?), and pie crust!!  So far so good, I have yet to master shortening and lard usage!!!  
« Last Edit: June 21, 2010, 04:19:51 am by J. Wilhelm »

MatthiasKoenig

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Some years ago I was cruising among the islands of the British Columbia coast...About 2 cups of wholegrain flour, about the same quantity of oats, a teaspoon or so of salt, a tablespoon of baking powder, a tablespoon or thereabouts of brown sugar, mix well. Chop in about 1/2lb butter so that the chunks are about 1/8" or so. Add a couple of eggs and enough water to make a dough; I had some vanilla essence so I added a generous glug of that too....Since it turned out something between a pancake and an American biscuit (probably an English scone comes close), we started out calling it panscuit, later in deference to the name of the vessel it became Spartanbread.

Sounds very similar to something I also " invented" a 50-50% ratio of instant oats and all purpose flour with sugar, cinnamon, and 1/2 teaspoon of baking powder per 1.5-2 cups, but no eggs.  It bakes rather fluffy at 375 F in the oven, and curiously I think the oats are changing the chemistry from what would otherwise be a traditional soda bread.  Somehow they make the bread softer yet it's slighly more compact than soda bread...

I made these out of sheer poverty, as much of my cooking came about from not being able to buy made foods! So I took the scientific approach...

I have intentionally experimented with flour and butter, shortening, plain water, and egg in different permutations, and varying the ratios, just to "learn" the chemistry of baking!  So far I've "re-invented" the wheel as far as soda bread, pizza bread, butter cookies (bisquits in the UK?), and pie crust!!  So far so good, I have yet to master shortening and lard usage!!!  

They also sound very familiar to the gingerbread cakes that are served at Colonial Williamsburg in Virginia. They are about the size of a kaiser roll(the smaller ones), and tasty doesn't even begin to touch it...that is, if you like gingerbread. I will look up the recipe.

 Also, lard isn't as difficult as you would think. In fact, I have less trouble with it than I do with Veg shortening. It's also been found that lard has good cholesterol, but not as much of the bad...the only thing is that the caloric value is pretty high, but that's why you can eat a bunch of biscuits(scones) that are made with shortening, but not as many made with lard. As disgusting as it may sound, many a poor folk have lived on lard sandwiches without major harm. I thought that it was just plain lard, but my grandmother, who was born in Eastern Tennessee(yes, she was what's known as a "hillbilly", but not "white trash"), said that they usually seasoned it with something first, or used rendered bacon fat, which may be a little bit better, but still poor folks food.
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MatthiasKoenig

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 Here's the gingerbread cake recipe, courtesy of the Raleigh Tavern Bakery in colonial williamsburg.

1 cup sugar
2 teaspoons ginger(preferably fresh grated, but powdered is okay in a pinch)
1 teaspoon nutmeg(same as above)
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1 cup butter, melted - margarine will make this slightly different I use butter
1/2 cup evaporated milk
1 cup unsulfered molasses
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 teaspoon lemon extract(you can also make lemon zest, but that's kind of a pain...I just use a good type of lemon extract...just don't cheap out TOO much ;D)
4+ cups of flour

In a bowl cream everything together but the flour. Add one cup of flour at a time making sure it is well mixed. When you get to the 4th cup the batter should be like moist clay. You do not want it at all runny. If it's runny you will have ginger snaps. You should be able to make a shape and have it hold it's shape. No kidding, it should be like modeling clay. Continue to add flour a little at a time until you get clay type dough. Then make small balls ( slightly smaller than a baseball) of dough and press then onto a cookie sheet. Let them remain dome shaped.

 Cook it at 350 for about 30 minutes, or untilthe house smalles of gingerbread....do the usual toothpick trick, then let them cool for about ten minutes.

 These will last about a week unrefrigerated, but if you are the type that likes to refrigerate everything, you can do that too, they just need to be warmed. butter, cream cheese, or just plain they are wunnerfull... ;D

J. Wilhelm

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Thanks; the recipe looks awesome (and straighforward) I'll be sure to give it a try...
« Last Edit: July 02, 2010, 09:56:25 am by J. Wilhelm »

Dave Leppo

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Heres one: 

http://www.stevenrinella.com/scavGuide.html

"After stumbling upon Auguste Escoffier’s 1903 culinary milestone Le Guide Culinaire, outdoorsman, avid hunter, and nature writer Steven Rinella embarks on an unusual quest: to procure all necessary ingredients for a forty-five-course meal, born entirely of Escoffier’s esoteric wild game recipes."

it's a great read, (not specifically steamy, though.)

Regal Aele

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Good Eats S12E11 Ginger: Rise of the Rhizome (2/2)
This clip has a really good Ginger Ale Recipe

hexidecima

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Got a copy of Chris Kimball's Fannie's Last Supper, a puported recreation of a high victorian dinner.  Unfortunately, it's not so much that than a modern cook deciding that the Victorians didn't know what they were doing and ignoring the recipes in favor of modern versions.  It does have some interesting tidbits on victorian customs, marketing practices, dealing with a monster cast iron stove, and such but for an actual authentic dinner, not so much. Kinda disappointing.

http://www.amazon.com/Fannies-Last-Supper-Re-creating-Cookbook/dp/1401323227/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1287065382&sr=1-1

CapnHarlock

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Re: Food! Food! Food! The Good, Bad, Ugly, and Tasty steampunk treats and drinks
« Reply #112 on: December 27, 2010, 08:17:05 pm »
I believe that I have found a new "love" in my search for  the perfect dry-rub for meats, and it is ridiculously-simple to prepare.

Mix:
 1 part cracked black pepper
 4 parts kosher salt
 5 parts ground cumin seed  (a 'part' can be anything from a pinch to a barrel)

That's it. Rub it on your "hunk o' critter" and refrigerate, wrapped overnight.

On broiled or grilled lamb - a marvelous spicy "Middle Eastern" flavor

On smoked beef (brisket), pork, or chicken, it is a definite "BBQ" flavor, but without the sometimes-overwhelming heat of ground-chili-based rubs.

When pan-seared before a long, slow braise, it develops an almost-cardamom sweetness that does truly-amazing things with a standard mirepoix (carrot, celery, onion, stock, herbs) braising liquid. (don't add extra salt) ..

It sounds to simple, but do give it a try. It is worth the effort.

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MatthiasKoenig

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Re: Food! Food! Food! The Good, Bad, Ugly, and Tasty steampunk treats and drinks
« Reply #113 on: December 27, 2010, 11:41:49 pm »
I believe that I have found a new "love" in my search for  the perfect dry-rub for meats, and it is ridiculously-simple to prepare.
Mix:
 1 part cracked black pepper
 4 parts kosher salt
 5 parts ground cumin seed  (a 'part' can be anything from a pinch to a barrel)
That's it. Rub it on your "hunk o' critter" and refrigerate, wrapped overnight.
On broiled or grilled lamb - a marvelous spicy "Middle Eastern" flavor
On smoked beef (brisket), pork, or chicken, it is a definite "BBQ" flavor, but without the sometimes-overwhelming heat of ground-chili-based rubs.
When pan-seared before a long, slow braise, it develops an almost-cardamom sweetness that does truly-amazing things with a standard mirepoix (carrot, celery, onion, stock, herbs) braising liquid. (don't add extra salt) ..
It sounds to simple, but do give it a try. It is worth the effort.

The cumin is good...also try some sweet smoked paprika on a brisket....not too much....I would say about a 1/4 part to the full parts of the salt and pepper...Mexican oregano does wonders for braised meats as well...it's what I use in my Mojo Sauce, along with garlic cloves and sour orange juice....great with pork especially, but the citrus works quite well with lamb and chicken....beef, not as much with the mojo...

Wormster

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Re: Food! Food! Food! The Good, Bad, Ugly, and Tasty steampunk treats and drinks
« Reply #114 on: December 28, 2010, 01:27:22 am »
"3 Flavours Chicken”

You Will Need:

Some chicken breast meat (1 per person)

Garlic (at least 1 clove per person)

Fresh Ginger Root  (about a thumb’s knuckle per person)

A pot of Hot Creamed Horseradish Sauce.

(Single Cream as an optional extra)*

Good cooking oil.

A Wok or non-stick frying pan to cook it in

 

Method:

First wash your hands and gather together your ingredients. Next, dice the Chicken breast into about 1-inch cubes. Then put your wok on the stove and add the oil. Wait until the oil is smoking hot and add the chicken cubes, fry until they take a colour. Whilst the chicken is frying, puree the garlic and grate the fresh ginger. You add the garlic puree first, and fry off (it might be advisable to turn the heat down to avoid scorching the garlic and other ingredients). Add the ginger and continue to gently fry. Open the pot of hot horseradish sauce and add the lot to the mix, continue to stir-fry. After about 7-10 minutes the mix will thicken and begin to brown, (at this point you add a little cream, and reduce the heat a bit.)* When you think the dish is thickened enough it is time to serve.

*if cooking for more than 3-4 the cream will make the sauce a bit thicker and go a bit further.

I suggest serving with simple stir-fry of 3 veg (mushrooms, leeks and peppers) and a few noodles! Or substitute the noodles for rice and peas.

NB: I reckon that for those of a veggie/vegan bent could use this recipe by subsituting either tofu or T.V.P. chunks for the chicken!
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Re: Food! Food! Food! The Good, Bad, Ugly, and Tasty steampunk treats and drinks
« Reply #115 on: December 28, 2010, 01:30:08 am »
Quote
The cumin is good...also try some sweet smoked paprika on a brisket....not too much....I would say about a 1/4 part to the full parts of the salt and pepper...Mexican oregano does wonders for braised meats as well...it's what I use in my Mojo Sauce, along with garlic cloves and sour orange juice....great with pork especially, but the citrus works quite well with lamb and chicken....beef, not as much with the mojo...

Mmmm.. sounds wonderful  - if you can find fresh "Cuban Oregano" (different plant) at a Latin market or a garden center with style, do try it as well - great stuff :)

MatthiasKoenig

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Re: Food! Food! Food! The Good, Bad, Ugly, and Tasty steampunk treats and drinks
« Reply #116 on: December 28, 2010, 02:03:32 am »
Quote
The cumin is good...also try some sweet smoked paprika on a brisket....not too much....I would say about a 1/4 part to the full parts of the salt and pepper...Mexican oregano does wonders for braised meats as well...it's what I use in my Mojo Sauce, along with garlic cloves and sour orange juice....great with pork especially, but the citrus works quite well with lamb and chicken....beef, not as much with the mojo...

Mmmm.. sounds wonderful  - if you can find fresh "Cuban Oregano" (different plant) at a Latin market or a garden center with style, do try it as well - great stuff :)

 Yes! That stuff is mighty tasty as well.... ;D I'm trying to find my recipe for german style sausage....it's a pretty basic recipe, but I've made it with a 50/50 mix of porkbutts and venison...it comes out pretty tasty as fresh/frozen, but it really comes into it's own as a long smoked sausage with pecan and oak as the smoking agents....hickory is okay too, as well as mesquite, but I like the pecan and oak.....even if I'm not in Texas at the moment.... :(

CapnHarlock

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Re: Food! Food! Food! The Good, Bad, Ugly, and Tasty steampunk treats and drinks
« Reply #117 on: December 28, 2010, 03:04:02 am »
:) one of the few advantages to my current location (NW Virginia) is that if one drives around the countryside in late Jan through March, it is often possible to find bundles of spring-pruning apple-branches by the roadside by the numerous local orchards - great smoking material :)

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Re: Food! Food! Food! The Good, Bad, Ugly, and Tasty steampunk treats and drinks
« Reply #118 on: December 29, 2010, 09:26:34 pm »
Molasses cookies!

No idea how to make them, but they're delicious.
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MatthiasKoenig

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Re: Food! Food! Food! The Good, Bad, Ugly, and Tasty steampunk treats and drinks
« Reply #119 on: December 29, 2010, 10:39:28 pm »
 Apple wood....well, hell, anything apple goes well with pork especially.....

 As far as molasses cookines go....well, here you are.... ;D

1 c. sugar
1 c. LARD....yes, LARD.....it's not going to taste the same if you use anything else...
1 c. molasses
1 c. hot water, not boiling
1 egg
4 1/2 c. flour
2 level tsp. baking soda
1 level tsp. salt
1 lg. tsp. cinnamon...more if you want to...just don't go over 3 tsp.
1 level tsp. ginger....same as with cinnamon
pinch of cloves....no more than a tsp.

Stir baking soda into hot water until dissolved; add molasses.
Cream lard with sugar until light; beat in egg. Stir together flour, salt and spices.

Add 1/2 of the dry ingredients (flour), the molasses mixture, then the remaining flour (dry) mixture.

Mix only until combined. Chill for 1 hour.

Roll out and cut into shapes on a lightly floured board, using cutters dipped in flour or cocoa to prevent sticking.

Transfer to greased cookie sheets and bake in a preheated 350°F oven for 10-15 minutes (depends upon size of cookies), or until done.

Cool on wire racks.

 There you go.....cookies so good you will slap your granny to get another one!

hexidecima

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Re: Food! Food! Food! The Good, Bad, Ugly, and Tasty steampunk treats and drinks
« Reply #120 on: December 30, 2010, 03:23:27 pm »
1 c. LARD....yes, LARD.....it's not going to taste the same if you use anything else...

ah wonderful lard.  what great stuff. Just make sure it hasn't gone off.  Had some choco-chip cookies from an amish stand once and ooooh, they were rancid. :P

aligov

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Re: Food! Food! Food! The Good, Bad, Ugly, and Tasty steampunk treats and drinks
« Reply #121 on: December 30, 2010, 03:59:12 pm »
www.amazon.co.uk/JELLY-Bompas-Parr-Sam-Harry/dp/1862058792/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1293724406&sr=8-1

Could i repectfully recommend the above work of genius by Messers Bompas and Parr.
Jellies with a touch of steampunk, especially the Glow in the Dark Quinine based jelly and the black cherry Funeral jelly.
Quite fun!

MatthiasKoenig

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Re: Food! Food! Food! The Good, Bad, Ugly, and Tasty steampunk treats and drinks
« Reply #122 on: December 30, 2010, 07:51:27 pm »
1 c. LARD....yes, LARD.....it's not going to taste the same if you use anything else...

ah wonderful lard.  what great stuff. Just make sure it hasn't gone off.  Had some choco-chip cookies from an amish stand once and ooooh, they were rancid. :P

 This is very true....nothing worse than that...also, if you are getting it from an "organic" site, be sure to stir it up good to make sure the bottom part of the container hasn't turned....
 One other thing, I rotate...literally rotate, like turn my container over...my lard about every three days....I don't know if it actually does anything, but my dear Granmamma used to do it, so it's good enough for me... ;D

Jellies....mmmmmm....jams, marmalades, preserves....any and all of them are good...I've yet to find one I didn't like...

CapnHarlock

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Re: Food! Food! Food! The Good, Bad, Ugly, and Tasty steampunk treats and drinks
« Reply #123 on: December 31, 2010, 01:36:21 am »
OK - NOT for vegetarians .... (but I suppose it could be with minor variations)

I just had an encounter with a friend who told me that she hated 'greens" (the Southern US definition - kale/collards/mustard/beets/chard). This is usually a result of the common Southern US "boil the crap outta' them until they stink and turn to sludge" cooking method - I was forced to do an "intervention dinner' to remedy this misconception - believe me, you DON'T hate greens

1 big bunch Swiss chard - cut stalks out and chop small, chop leaves roughly
1/2 pound Mexican or Salvadorean chorizo sausage - the fresh stuff, not the Spanish dried kind - unskin and crumble
1 large yellow onion, diced fine
chopped garlic to taste (I use a lot)
chicken broth

1) sear the sausage, then lower heat and let it render - break it up w/a "granny-style" potato masher
2) add the onion and sautee until almost translucent, then add garlic and chopped chard stems
3) raise heat, sautee a few min, until chard stems  soften a bit then add chopped leaves and stir-fry a a minute or two.
4) add a bit of broth, and let it steam about 5 minutes.
5) enjoy



Camillia du Chine

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Re: Food! Food! Food! The Good, Bad, Ugly, and Tasty steampunk treats and drinks
« Reply #124 on: December 31, 2010, 05:11:58 am »
OK - NOT for vegetarians .... (but I suppose it could be with minor variations)

I just had an encounter with a friend who told me that she hated 'greens" (the Southern US definition - kale/collards/mustard/beets/chard). This is usually a result of the common Southern US "boil the crap outta' them until they stink and turn to sludge" cooking method - I was forced to do an "intervention dinner' to remedy this misconception - believe me, you DON'T hate greens

1 big bunch Swiss chard - cut stalks out and chop small, chop leaves roughly
1/2 pound Mexican or Salvadorean chorizo sausage - the fresh stuff, not the Spanish dried kind - unskin and crumble
1 large yellow onion, diced fine
chopped garlic to taste (I use a lot)
chicken broth

1) sear the sausage, then lower heat and let it render - break it up w/a "granny-style" potato masher
2) add the onion and sautee until almost translucent, then add garlic and chopped chard stems
3) raise heat, sautee a few min, until chard stems  soften a bit then add chopped leaves and stir-fry a a minute or two.
4) add a bit of broth, and let it steam about 5 minutes.
5) enjoy


This sounds yummy - and I like greens and am a vegan!  This would be an easy conversion if one has access to the various vegan chorizos available and used veggie broth.  I'm especially partial to kale because it keeps its lovely ruffles even when cooked.  My darling wife (also vegan) is a huge greens fan, southern or northern styles, and would love this recipe  :-*