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Author Topic: Brass-on-brass glue?  (Read 26372 times)
MechanicalDoll
Gunner
**
Austria Austria



« on: July 17, 2008, 05:41:18 pm »

Dear colleagues,

can anyone recommend a glue that works on brass? It has to endure some slight stress.

Thanks in advance,

MechanicalDoll
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Rick
Officer
***
United States United States


C.O.B!


« Reply #1 on: July 17, 2008, 05:45:09 pm »

there's a 2 part epoxy-like glue that can glue copper pipe together, used for plumbing instead of soldering. Reasonably strong, worked for at least the year I was at the place I did the repair for. Worked just fine on cold and hot water pipes.

http://superglue.supergluecorp.com/copperbond.html

Not sure if that'd work for brass or not but might be a start in the right direction.

Dear colleagues,

can anyone recommend a glue that works on brass? It has to endure some slight stress.

Thanks in advance,

MechanicalDoll
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JingleJoe
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
United Kingdom United Kingdom


The Green Dungeon Alchemist


WWW
« Reply #2 on: July 17, 2008, 05:47:02 pm »

Sand your to-be-glued area first then use some epoxy Smiley it comes in two parts and you mix equal amounts (really quickly or it can dry on your mixing surface!) then use a stick or something you don't mind being destroyed by glue to apply and hold your brass together for a while, by the by a little warmth aids the setting and doing it in the cold can make the glue ... not as good as it could be Cheesy I speak from experience Roll Eyes
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Providing weird sound contraptions and time machines since 2064.
MechanicalDoll
Gunner
**
Austria Austria



« Reply #3 on: July 17, 2008, 05:58:48 pm »

Many Thank's, Rick and JingleJoe Smiley
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Dr Hilke DeKlicke
Guest
« Reply #4 on: July 17, 2008, 06:02:16 pm »

Araldite - other epoxies pale by comparison. Don't be tempted by the cheaper alternatives, an Araldite bond will probably last longer than the brass!
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Jake of All Trades
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


Brass addict, inventor, and scoundrel with a heart


WWW
« Reply #5 on: July 17, 2008, 06:06:28 pm »

*Chants* JB Kwik!  JB Kwik!  Man's finest epoxy to make metals stick!

Say, I ought to go into marketing!  Seriously, though, I've found JB Kwik (the fast-setting version of JB Weld) and absolutely invaluable and unmatched tool in brasscraft. The only thing that surpasses it is actual solder, but of course that means a good deal of heat which can have rather adverse effects on the rest of the project.  Good ol' nuts and bolts are, naturally, the most durable method of junction, but I take it this is a union where these will not work?
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MechanicalDoll
Gunner
**
Austria Austria



« Reply #6 on: July 17, 2008, 06:26:18 pm »

I work on a very small object. Therefore I'd need clockmakers tools for making nuts and bolts, which I haven't :/
Welding could be an option, but I have no experience on it.
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Mr. Boltneck
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


« Reply #7 on: July 17, 2008, 06:53:42 pm »

Actually, for small-scale work in brass (and quite a few other metals and alloys), silver-soldering (also called silver brazing) is an excellent and strong method. Use a small propane torch or a jeweler's torch (not one of those cheap mini-torches - the flame is hot, but too small to provide enough total energy), and be sure to place your work on a firebrick or charcoal block. Clean the area to be joined, apply an appropriate paste or liquid flux (to prevent the surface from oxidizing before the solder can join it) and a few small pieces of solder to the join, then heat the assembly until the solder flows. Remember that the whole object has to be heated somewhat, and the area around the join needs to reach the fusing point of the solder. Try it on scrap, first. It almost takes longer to describe than to execute, and is actually fairly easy.

You may want to use one of the lower-temperature silver alloys for brass. In the US these are usually sold as "medium" and "easy." You can also look for brands like Tix, which are often used for brazing guards and other fittings to knife blades without destroying the temper. If you need to make several joins in sequence, start with the highest-temperature solder, and work down.

Oh, and don't forget eye protection!
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bullis
Guest
« Reply #8 on: July 17, 2008, 06:58:56 pm »

if strenght isnt that important solder used for electronics works well too...
when it comes to glue my vote is pl400 ... i mean it even says it can replace welding in some cases ! :-D and its not 2 component so thats good too...
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sidecar_jon
Snr. Officer
****


« Reply #9 on: July 17, 2008, 07:17:55 pm »

remember with glue, the thinner the joint the better the strength....So use a good epoxy and clamp it as it sets.
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Jake of All Trades
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


Brass addict, inventor, and scoundrel with a heart


WWW
« Reply #10 on: July 17, 2008, 07:37:02 pm »

I work on a very small object. Therefore I'd need clockmakers tools for making nuts and bolts, which I haven't :/
Welding could be an option, but I have no experience on it.
Understandable!  JB Weld hasn't really anything to do with welding, though.  It is simply a 2-part epoxy which is made special for metal work.
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Gazongola
Zeppelin Admiral
******
England England


I am the flashing monocle.


« Reply #11 on: July 18, 2008, 01:37:22 am »

Araldite!!!
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Glass
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States


Creature of the night: 1700-0300.


« Reply #12 on: July 18, 2008, 01:49:46 am »

Understandable!  JB Weld hasn't really anything to do with welding, though.  It is simply a 2-part epoxy which is made special for metal work.

Another vote for JB Weld. However, I've found the quick set isn't as strong as the original. Some things are worth waiting for...

Patrick
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Commander Obadiah
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand


Gatherer of Misguided Inventions


« Reply #13 on: July 18, 2008, 08:06:52 am »

I'm torn between JB and Araldite... Although solder trumps all.

Commander C. Obadiah
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The Steampunk code: 'To delicately dismantle the system from within, if it's not too much trouble'
Maximum Humphries
Officer
***
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #14 on: July 18, 2008, 03:47:05 pm »

...i think the answers solder...
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