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Havelock Oliphant
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Ghostly Airship


« Reply #50 on: August 07, 2008, 07:51:05 pm »

cool.
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Dr cornelius quack
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Arrant Carney. Phmebian Cultural Attache.


« Reply #51 on: August 07, 2008, 08:19:26 pm »

If we had a dedicated "Glue Thread." We could make that sticky as well.

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Such are the feeble bases on which many a public character rests.

Today, I am two, separate Gorillas.
Jakoby T Simmeon
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It has a button on it! I want to push it!


« Reply #52 on: August 09, 2008, 05:03:17 pm »

If we had a dedicated "Glue Thread." We could make that sticky as well.



I believe that thread would wind up with nothing but a lot of cut and paste.

Good on you Mr. Spaceman! Quite a fine bit of work.
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Adventurer - Contraptionist - Scientist - Slightly Mad
Michael Bend Esq.
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« Reply #53 on: August 11, 2008, 02:41:39 pm »

How to make a steam engine without a lathe...
http://www.royuk.co.uk/steam_engines.htm#First%20Steam%20Engine
I've been following this design for about 4 months and hope to complete it sometime next year...


And another one:
http://www.btinternet.com/~jhpart/steam2.htm
Less pictures, more words here, and so much more detailed instructions and (possibly) more complex too.
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If you're not scared or angry at the thought of a human brain being controlled remotely, then it could be this prototype of mine is finally starting to work.
  - John Alejandro King
Ambie
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You don't learn much when everything goes right.


« Reply #54 on: August 13, 2008, 02:12:06 pm »

Here be a link to a short introductory tutorial on how to use a file for wood or metal work:

http://www.accuratebuilding.com/publications/recipes/tools/how_to_file_surface_edges.pdf


And a link to an example of how to build a simple holder to organise your small files for ready use at yer bench (it is written from a jeweler's perspective). 

http://www.lapidaryjournal.com/stepbystep/apr02files.cfm
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A.G.Morgan
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« Reply #55 on: August 21, 2008, 04:31:09 am »

How to make a steam engine without a lathe...
http://www.royuk.co.uk/steam_engines.htm#First%20Steam%20Engine
I've been following this design for about 4 months and hope to complete it sometime next year...


What kinda output are you expecting for it? Got any applications in mind?
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Rando
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Utilitarian Fabrication Domination


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« Reply #56 on: August 28, 2008, 04:15:27 pm »

While working on my costume pistol i discovered a way to make dials that have resistance as long as the piece (knob) has an axel (stem).    the best part about this is oce you are done it leaves no residue on the axle

1. Go out and purchase some black silicone adhesive.  It comes in a little tube like liquid nails and such.
2. Drill a hole where you want a nob on the device you are making.  Make this hole larger than the axle of the knob you are going to put on.  if need be secure an axle to the knob.
3.  Dab a couple of globs inside the hole the axel is going to go in.  then use a screwdriver to work the silicone against the walls of the hole. then ofcourse clean that screwdriver
4. Wait, do something like learn backgammon or cook bacon.
5.  In a few hours you can push the dial or knob into position and it will have a lot of friction to either pull out or rotate.
6.  Show off your new doodad.  Exquisite!


I used this to apply an Aether regulator to my Noiseless Vanquisher (eNVy) assassination pistol and instead of an axle on the knob i used a fuse to give it that much cooler of an effect so basically you can now pull the knob out revealing a glass vial with metal ends.
« Last Edit: August 28, 2008, 05:57:31 pm by Rando » Logged

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JingleJoe
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« Reply #57 on: August 28, 2008, 05:21:33 pm »

While working on my costume pistol i discovered a way to make dials that have resistance as long as the piece (knob) has an axel (stem).  Go out and purchase some black silicone adhesive.  then just dab a couple of globs inside the hole the axel is going to go in.  in a few hours you can push the dial or knob into position and it will have a lot of friction to either pull out or rotate.

This will allow you to drill a hole slightly larger than your axel into anything like wood or plastic and then add to it an actually turning and secure knob
Could you put this in the form of step by step instructions Smiley?
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Providing weird sound contraptions and time machines since 2064.
Kirsty
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« Reply #58 on: August 31, 2008, 06:11:42 pm »

How to make Gear stencils for wall/home decorations:

Step 1.
Firstly go find a picture of a gear, or if you have photoshop or similar, download some gear brushes and put them the size you want onto a white background (making sure the gear is in a colour you can see for cutting out)
Now I used these brushes for my gears: http://ewark.deviantart.com/art/Gearing-Brushes-89417697 & http://redheadstock.deviantart.com/art/Gears-Vectors-Brushes-92472909

Step 2.
So after creating a stamp like image of the gears I wanted, I then printed them off, and stuck them on some cereal box cardboard, (yes, the middle will fall out, so cut it out AS a circle because you will need it when you are spraying the stencil on the surface) like so:

Step 3.
Next, you will need to get either a paint in desired colour, or spray paint (which I find easier). I bought plasti kote spray in the colour 'Brass', I purchased this from B&Q (but I'm sure you can get it from any DIY store/online) and it cost me £2.98, but you can buy bigger cans, I bought the smaller version as I do not need loads of it for my wall.

This is what the spray looks like:

& also the actual website with colour charts here: http://www.plasti-kote.co.uk/Product/pcode---4427/pccode---6751#colour_chart

Step 4.
Now I practised using the spray and my stencils on paper first, I did this in a room with all windows open as the stuff stinks, make sure to shake the tin for a minute before first use, and keep shaking it every 10 seconds afterwards.

Here are my finished results on paper:



Finished!
Please note, these ARE on paper, and I have not yet actually done it on my wall, but when I have done I will upload pictures, the paper was a bit wobbly so use blue tac to stick stencil down, as you can see my first attempts were a little wonky!! But I will upload some photos after I have done this in my room!
Enjoy Smiley
« Last Edit: August 31, 2008, 06:14:42 pm by Kirsty » Logged
JingleJoe
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« Reply #59 on: August 31, 2008, 11:16:15 pm »

I added the gear generator to your how-to kirsty Smiley you may find it useful also Wink
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Kirsty
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« Reply #60 on: September 01, 2008, 01:46:14 pm »

thanks that's really helpful! Smiley
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K. D. R. Tempus
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What could possibly go wrong?


« Reply #61 on: September 10, 2008, 07:48:49 pm »

This seems to be the appropriate thread...

Where could I go to learn basic electronics/circuitry, enough so I could wire my sonic screwdriver (or whatever) for LEDs and/or sound? I am a complete ignoramous on this subject.

Thanks!
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'Arthur, you have no historical perspective. Science in those days worked in broad strokes. They got right to the point. Nowadays, it's all just molecule, molecule, molecule. Nothing ever happens big.' ~The Tick
Zwack
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And introducing the wonderful Irish (Mrs Z).


« Reply #62 on: September 10, 2008, 08:08:41 pm »

Go to your local (decent) toy store or RadioShack and look for a relatively simple electronics kit (something like "50 electronic projects" is ideal).

For what you are looking at relatively simple circuits are all you'll need...

Power supply (battery), load resistor and led(s) hooked up properly will provide you with a simple light.  Add a switch in and you're set.

If you want them to flash then the circuit is WAY more complicated.... about half a dozen components from memory for a simple flashing lights circuit.  Sound can be done in multiple ways depending on what you want... simplest is to put a buzzer in, more complicated is to build another simple circuit that produces varying notes... 

Any simple electronics kit will have the basic circuits, you can practice with them until you achieve the effects you want... then you will probably want to learn to solder so that you can produce smaller (circuit board less) versions. 

Something like this http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2102913&cp=2032062.2032398&parentPage=family probably covers more than you need...

I hope that this helps,

Z.
« Last Edit: September 10, 2008, 11:06:26 pm by Zwack » Logged

"At least those oddballs are interesting" - My Wife.
I'm British but living in America.  This might explain my spelling.
K. D. R. Tempus
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What could possibly go wrong?


« Reply #63 on: September 10, 2008, 10:44:16 pm »

Thanks, Zwak, that's a great idea. Unfortunately, I live behind the Redwood Curtain in far Northern Calif. Our only toy store, KB Toys, closed months ago. I'll see what I can find online.

Thanks again!
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Rando
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Utilitarian Fabrication Domination


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« Reply #64 on: September 11, 2008, 02:30:54 pm »

Actually a introduction to circuitry kit you can purchase possibly on the intertubes can provide you with a on and off blinking LED, and since the load of an LED is so load try hooking up a series or paralell of them to blink on and get a voltage tester to see where the current is on the off blinks so that you can set up another circuit of offbeat leds.  The sound would be harder to reproduce but I remember all scouts in the electronics merit badge class had to purchase them and construct them (so its doable for a 13 year old).
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Zwack
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And introducing the wonderful Irish (Mrs Z).


« Reply #65 on: September 11, 2008, 03:11:47 pm »

OR there's these...

http://www.mrollins.com/flash3b.html  Just use LEDs with built-in flashers... Smiley

http://www.mrollins.com/circuit.html   All sorts of options, all drawn as construction drawings rather than schematics.

http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/Bill_Bowden/page5.htm Electronic schematics probably aren't much help to you...

http://www.reprise.com/host/circuits/transistor_flasher.asp Fairly straightforward circuit (8 components)

http://www.reprise.com/host/circuits/default.asp Looks like a combination of introduction and simple circuits...

http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/Bill_Bowden/ Another comprehensive resource doesn't look like it's too useful for the beginner.

Z.
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Dr. Mors
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« Reply #66 on: September 17, 2008, 08:24:25 pm »

Unfortunately, I live behind the Redwood Curtain in far Northern Calif.

I dont know where exactly you are behind the redwood curtain but theres a radio shack in garberville and one in eureka.  I used to live up there but now im closer to civilization. 
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Ad Majorem Mors Gloriam
K. D. R. Tempus
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What could possibly go wrong?


« Reply #67 on: November 01, 2008, 12:23:12 am »

Yay! We're back!

Zwak, I'm the proud owner of one of those 50 project electronics kits (Eureka store). Unfortunately, I'm hip-deep (emphasis on the 'eep') in crochet projects and will have to wait to play with it.

I really came here to ask another different noob question: how do I keep my brass and copper do-hickeys from corroding and/or changing color? Or do i have to polish my knob incessantly -- because I don't have a knob and wouldn't know what to do with it if I did. Wait, what was the question?

Happy Hollow-weenies, everyone, and thanks to our luscious hosts for getting us back in business!
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JingleJoe
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« Reply #68 on: November 01, 2008, 01:45:29 am »


I really came here to ask another different noob question: how do I keep my brass and copper do-hickeys from corroding and/or changing color? Or do i have to polish my knob incessantly
Polishing is fun! The msell of brasso, seeing everything come up all shiney after your hard work Cheesy Thats the only way in my book but I suppose you could varnish them or coat them in something, but I don't know what would work.
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Zwack
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And introducing the wonderful Irish (Mrs Z).


« Reply #69 on: November 01, 2008, 03:03:19 pm »

Rejuvenation lacquer their brass finish light fixtures.  So I would guess that a clear lacquer will stop the corrosion while it remains intact.  If it has holes in the finish (either through poor application, or wear) then you will end up with a spotty finish, but that's what I would do if I didn't want to polish brass.

Z.
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Zwack
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And introducing the wonderful Irish (Mrs Z).


« Reply #70 on: November 01, 2008, 06:49:49 pm »

I should also link to the "basic leather carving" tutorial that I put up on Spare Goggles.

It shows how you carve leather, and then an attempt to do something very similar using just a spoon handle and a utility knife.

Z.

http://www.mutant.net/bg/  I need to work on the host as it's a bit slow... Sorry.

  
« Last Edit: December 01, 2009, 03:27:25 pm by Zwack » Logged
nathaniel
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« Reply #71 on: November 03, 2008, 07:01:06 am »

so i recently made some flourescent fluid from highlighters as per the howtoon pg 1
ive found that papermate intro highlighters work exetremely well and the green is deep and glowy
pics to come shortly
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PHIRZCOL
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« Reply #72 on: November 03, 2008, 07:29:41 am »

Keyboard instructible http://www.instructables.com/id/ELEBCUMFMZA9QQ6/
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A.G.Morgan
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« Reply #73 on: November 08, 2008, 04:51:44 am »

Alright, new question.

In many of the homemade steam engines I've seen, copper tubing is a major component of most of the systems. Sadly in looking for materials to build my own, I find that copper is extremely expensive.

What are the benefits of using copper, and what applications is it best suited to in a steam system? What parts that would work better or as well using steel pipe?

And will a propane torch cut through copper tubing?
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JingleJoe
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« Reply #74 on: November 08, 2008, 08:36:07 pm »

A hack saw cuts copper pipe better Wink
Also, the price of copper pipe is ridiculous, I think it is mainly used for it's good heat conduction, but you can get it for free! Just go for a big trek everywhere you can looking for skips, ask other humans if they've seen any work on houses being done and you will find skips and copper pipes in a few of them!
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