The Steampunk Forum at Brass Goggles
October 18, 2017, 03:11:14 am *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Support BrassGoggles! Donate once or $3/mo.
 See details here.
 
   Home   Blog Help Rules Login Register  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Titles and terms of address  (Read 2728 times)
The Grand Duchess
Snr. Officer
****
Patior Sed Supervivo


« on: March 20, 2007, 12:35:49 pm »

http://www.hmsrichmond.org/avast/titles02.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nobility

http://www.heraldica.org/topics/odegard/titlefaq.htm
http://www.amazon.com/Everyday-Life-1800s-Students-Historians/dp/1582970637/ref=pd_lpo_k2_dp_k2a_3_txt/104-1699648-3506364

For those of you interested in the differences between royalty, nobility, and gentry.

It's also a good idea to consult a real-time etiquette book- I found much of the info here to limited.  For instance, a duke or duchess, in conversation, may be called 'Your Grace'. One calls a person 'Sir' or 'Lady' before that person's name if that person is a member of the nobility.  The gentry don't have titles, no matter how much land they own.

This is what happens from reading tons of Jane Austen, Arthur Conan Doyle and Charles Dickens in high school.
« Last Edit: March 20, 2007, 12:41:07 pm by The Grand Duchess » Logged

A true alternative subculture is one that not only questions the social status quo but poses viable solutions to some of the perceived underlying problems. Difference from the norm is not the same as superiority to the mainstream unless it can be  argued that the difference is positing a better way.
OHebel Wring
Snr. Officer
****
The world is only 80 days away.


WWW
« Reply #1 on: March 20, 2007, 12:36:38 pm »

and are we to be taking hints from this posting, your grace?


 Grin
Logged

β€œThe world is full of obvious things which nobody by any chance ever observes. β€œ
-Sherlock Holmes
Lazaras
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


Have Wierd; Will Travel.


WWW
« Reply #2 on: March 20, 2007, 01:11:40 pm »

As always, informative and insightful Duchess. thank you.
Logged

Cheapie Theatre
Want something to read? Got ten minutes to kill? Here you go!
Ninepins Cutter
Gunner
**
United States United States


« Reply #3 on: March 20, 2007, 01:19:52 pm »

'Ere, we low class blokes don' go in for that muck.

'Course, that *might* explain the clouts on the noggin, too.
Logged

Is eram  igneus ut ego supervenio - Family Motto
Ultimate Antihero
Guest
« Reply #4 on: March 20, 2007, 01:33:41 pm »

Ah, most thankful, Your Grace. I was thinking of inquiring for such information, actually.
Logged
OHebel Wring
Snr. Officer
****
The world is only 80 days away.


WWW
« Reply #5 on: March 20, 2007, 01:42:39 pm »

I will now be addressed as "Raugraf OHebel Wring".

Logged
The Grand Duchess
Snr. Officer
****
Patior Sed Supervivo


« Reply #6 on: March 20, 2007, 05:32:53 pm »

and are we to be taking hints from this posting, your grace?


 Grin

Not at all.

 what I was thinking about was how many people in RPGs have titled characters.  Even though I myself am not paticipating, I thought it might be of use.  Also with story-writing, picking a forum name, and so on.
Logged
The Grand Duchess
Snr. Officer
****
Patior Sed Supervivo


« Reply #7 on: March 20, 2007, 05:34:11 pm »

'Ere, we low class blokes don' go in for that muck.

'Course, that *might* explain the clouts on the noggin, too.

Thank you for making cola fly out of my nose.  I needed that shower, anyway. Grin
Logged
OHebel Wring
Snr. Officer
****
The world is only 80 days away.


WWW
« Reply #8 on: March 20, 2007, 05:41:32 pm »

and none of the postings told us how to title a GRAND duchess.

is it, your graciest?



your gracier than regular graces




your grace-pluss



 Shocked
Logged
The Grand Duchess
Snr. Officer
****
Patior Sed Supervivo


« Reply #9 on: March 21, 2007, 02:04:28 am »

'Duchess' will be fine.  Or if you want to be polite, 'Your Grace'.
Logged
Lazaras
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


Have Wierd; Will Travel.


WWW
« Reply #10 on: March 21, 2007, 02:06:40 am »

*soft smile*

Always good to know how to address people in a proper manner Duchess.
Logged
Dr von Zarkov
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


<Maddest Scientist>


« Reply #11 on: March 21, 2007, 04:56:54 pm »

Within the Royal Household, where this correspondent has been entertained, the Regent (Queen Elizabeth) is generally addressed as "Ma'am" or "Mum".
Logged

"The fact that I wear the protective coloration of sedate citizenship is a ruse of the fox β€” I learned it long ago."
– Loren Eiseley
Luminous Grey
Gunner
**
United States United States

The sky outside is...


« Reply #12 on: March 21, 2007, 09:11:35 pm »

Though the gentry don't normally have titles, is it alright still to address them as 'Sir' or 'Lady' out of politeness/respect?
Logged

So I like to get high off the dust on the 170-year-old books in the library. What of it?
Proud Member of P.I.R.A.T.E.S.
The Grand Duchess
Snr. Officer
****
Patior Sed Supervivo


« Reply #13 on: March 21, 2007, 09:44:06 pm »

I think- I don't want to swear to it- that this is where calling someone Mr., Master (a young boy), Mrs. and Miss (an unmarried woman of any age)  comes in.  Last names are used unless one knows the person well.  A married woman's name would be 'Mrs. (husband's first name) (husband's last name); hence, Mr. and Mrs. Harold Smith.  If a woman divorced (which would have been scandalous), it became Mrs. (her first name) (husband's last name), as in, Mrs. Jane Smith.  A widow retained her husband's first and last name. Unmarried women used their first names and their father's last name, as in Miss Jane McGill.

In English, technically, women don't 'have' last names.  They have their father's family name or their husband's last name.  That's one of the reasons some feminists made up new names or used different spellings of their last names or took their mother's maiden names.  Why? Because during the nineteenth century women were property.  They could not buy or sell land, take a job, or go where they pleased without permission from their husbands or fathers, except in those cases where they were willing to gain an unsavory reputation.  They could also be locked up in their homes for disobeying the eldest male, and could not control their own incomes.  If there was a divorce, their husbands retained custody and they could be kept from having their children.  Their fathers were also under no obligation to allow them to marry or be educated- that's why men still out of tradition, often ask a girl's father for his daughter's hand in marriage.

Tihs is why, in fact, it's fantasy in steampunk for women running around on their own to be seen as acceptable.  In the real 19th century, women without men were morally suspect and seen for the most part as disgusting abberations.  Some women married just to get away from their fathers, or pretended to have been married, because a woman who could claim to be a widow was able to manage her own affairs.  That's why so many courtesans had 'keepers' and often had 'Mrs.' as part of their names, and why so many feminists got married despite not living with their husbands.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.073 seconds with 16 queries.