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Author Topic: ferrofluid machine  (Read 2853 times)
1helios1
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« on: January 08, 2008, 08:57:11 am »

http://jmagus.deviantart.com/art/ferrofluid-machine-74088592

my first steampunk creation. though not my only. I am very proud of it, though it has many flaws I would like to correct. criticism is welcome, though it will be promptly disregarded
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Otto Von Pifka
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goggles? they're here somewhere.....


« Reply #1 on: January 08, 2008, 09:18:04 am »

neato!

odd thing, first try at looking and my spyware filter threw a fit. I told it I was sorry and would never look there again....

second look it didn't even look up from the newspaper...strange.

I know, but I just HAD to go look... Grin
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johnny99
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« Reply #2 on: January 08, 2008, 09:23:10 am »

     Very cool.  An Idea might be to put a slowly pulsing electromagnetic coil behind it.
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« Reply #3 on: January 08, 2008, 07:16:42 pm »

curses, I've been wanting to be the first to sport a ferrofluid project and you have beat me to it. DRATS!
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« Reply #4 on: January 08, 2008, 08:35:26 pm »

That is very impressive looking!  Is it relatively static?  Or can you dynamically manipulate the electromagnetic field to change the shape of the fluid?
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1helios1
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« Reply #5 on: January 08, 2008, 09:18:10 pm »

That is very impressive looking!  Is it relatively static?  Or can you dynamically manipulate the electromagnetic field to change the shape of the fluid?

unfortunately, no. it was my original intention but i could not find a good way of doing it.
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akumabito
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« Reply #6 on: January 08, 2008, 09:49:25 pm »

I can't help but think the ferrofluid machine needs to be hooked up to the output of a theremin... funk it up!
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JingleJoe
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« Reply #7 on: January 09, 2008, 04:39:08 am »

ferrofluid rocks!! woo a very very very cool little doohicky you have there Smiley
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The Kilted Commodore
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« Reply #8 on: January 09, 2008, 07:45:45 am »

In regards to manipulating the magnetic field, though I am no scientist, I would imagine that building some sort of electromagnet, where the spinning of the magnet creates electricity (or vice versa.. its been awhile) with a setup to control the rate of spin, or voltage, would affect the magnetic field produced?

Once again, I am no scientist, and electromagnetism is far from being my specialty.  That would be in the fields of the visual arts, painting, lithography, the like.
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1helios1
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« Reply #9 on: January 09, 2008, 08:25:58 am »

In regards to manipulating the magnetic field, though I am no scientist, I would imagine that building some sort of electromagnet, where the spinning of the magnet creates electricity (or vice versa.. its been awhile) with a setup to control the rate of spin, or voltage, would affect the magnetic field produced?

Once again, I am no scientist, and electromagnetism is far from being my specialty.  That would be in the fields of the visual arts, painting, lithography, the like.

some sort of setup with an electro magnet would be quite doable, but the problem is i could not rig up anything that looked nearly as impressive as what i could do with that rare earth magnet
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Prof. Friedrich VonHart, PhD
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« Reply #10 on: January 09, 2008, 01:49:20 pm »

An electromagnet is nothing more than a coil of wire with a current flowing through it. Simply coil up some (clear) insulated copper wire, and hook up to a battery and possibly a potentiometer to cary the current, and you've got yourself a fancy looking electromagnet. Or you could use magnet wire, which has a very thin coating on it so that the insulation is not necessary.

check this out:
http://www.brassgoggles.co.uk/bg-forum/index.php?topic=5472.0

The coil of wire in the middle (the spinning part) is nothing more than an electromagnet. I imagine a large coil of copper wire wrapped around the section where the magnet ascends would look rather nice.
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1helios1
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« Reply #11 on: January 09, 2008, 08:25:26 pm »

yeah, but the electromagnets i made were not as strong as i would have liked. perhaps in the future i might try again.
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sidecar_jon
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« Reply #12 on: January 09, 2008, 08:36:36 pm »

In regards to manipulating the magnetic field, though I am no scientist, I would imagine that building some sort of electromagnet, where the spinning of the magnet creates electricity (or vice versa.. its been awhile) with a setup to control the rate of spin, or voltage, would affect the magnetic field produced?

Once again, I am no scientist, and electromagnetism is far from being my specialty.  That would be in the fields of the visual arts, painting, lithography, the like.

some sort of setup with an electro magnet would be quite doable, but the problem is i could not rig up anything that looked nearly as impressive as what i could do with that rare earth magnet

Just an idea from a non electrical person. but what about the innards out of a big stereo speaker?...they are coil controlled....in fact could be sound controlled!
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1helios1
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« Reply #13 on: January 09, 2008, 08:38:05 pm »

In regards to manipulating the magnetic field, though I am no scientist, I would imagine that building some sort of electromagnet, where the spinning of the magnet creates electricity (or vice versa.. its been awhile) with a setup to control the rate of spin, or voltage, would affect the magnetic field produced?

Once again, I am no scientist, and electromagnetism is far from being my specialty.  That would be in the fields of the visual arts, painting, lithography, the like.

some sort of setup with an electro magnet would be quite doable, but the problem is i could not rig up anything that looked nearly as impressive as what i could do with that rare earth magnet

im going to have to think about that

Just an idea from a non electrical person. but what about the innards out of a big stereo speaker?...they are coil controlled....in fact could be sound controlled!
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Prof. Friedrich VonHart, PhD
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« Reply #14 on: January 09, 2008, 09:36:14 pm »

The coils on speakers do not produce a very strong current. They rely on a strong permanent magnet and repulsive forces to drive the speaker. If you want more power, use a bigger battery. Or add an iron core to your electromagnet coil, power will be more directed.
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The Kilted Commodore
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« Reply #15 on: January 10, 2008, 07:30:00 am »

Professor, I do believe you have gotten to the heart of what it was I was thinking of.  Both the Iron core, and the coil electromagnet.  However, I find myself wondering whether or not, with sufficient power, and the proper parts, one could not create a sort of manual toggle to control the amount of current the electromagnet was running on, thus affecting the magnetic field?  After all, the ferrofluid is what is being manipulated, and to do this, one must manipulate the magnetic fields.  Whether or not an electromagnet is a viable alternative to a rare earth (or even your standard iron) magnet is not the issue.  I merely made the suggestion, believing that the observer has a greater chance of influencing and controlling the magnetic fields produced by such a device.
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Prof. Friedrich VonHart, PhD
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« Reply #16 on: January 10, 2008, 01:51:14 pm »

All you really need is a constant voltage source and a potentiometer. V=IR (V is voltage, I is current, R is resistance). If voltage is constant and you vary resistance with a potentiometer (a component which is nothing more than a variable resistor), you should get variations in current. Potentiometers come in many flavors, including a slide or a knob. I'm sure you could also wire up a bunch of resistors in small auxiliary circuits which were engaged by a series of toggle switches of you would prefer that. That'd give you incremental change in current rather than a continuously variable one.
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