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Author Topic: How do you describe Steampunk clothes?  (Read 160 times)
Kleven
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« on: January 02, 2018, 10:55:04 am »

I type in 'steampunk girls' or 'steampunk boys' and I see various outfits, but these differ from victorian outfits or edwardian outfits. Are there terms for the vests and puffy shirts?
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Kensington Locke
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« Reply #1 on: January 02, 2018, 03:18:00 pm »

I'm no clothing expert, but take yourself over to Steampunk Emporium.  It's an online clothing store.  No, I ain't shilling for them,

Browse around.  Look at the stuff and what they call it.  Read the blurbs explaining the origin.

It's not just a shop, it's a museum. Smiley
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #2 on: January 02, 2018, 06:45:43 pm »

So what makes clothing Steampunk, I guess is what you would have to think about. Unfortunately, when you type Steampunk you will first see all the commercial stuff with glued cogs and gears, or see all the sexy girls wearing mini bustles. Nothing wrong with that, but I prefer to describe Steampunk clothing as Victorian inspired clothing with a heavy dose of Science Fiction. In fact it does not have to be British Victorian. It can be American (eg Western) or Japanese (eg Meïji Era) or Mexican (eg Revolución Era) or German (eg Franco Prussian War period), or whatever suits your fancy. That means you can look for 19th century style clothing and modify it yourself, for a rather convincing Steampunk look. Otherwise you might find yourself buying really poor quality stuff - with a few gears attached.
« Last Edit: January 02, 2018, 06:51:25 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged

groomporter
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« Reply #3 on: January 02, 2018, 08:27:30 pm »

I type in 'steampunk girls' or 'steampunk boys' and I see various outfits, but these differ from victorian outfits or edwardian outfits. Are there terms for the vests and puffy shirts?

Another term for the vests would be waistcoats, but as  J. Wilhelm implied your clothing can be as historically accurate as you want, or not at all. Personally I tend to go with what might pass for a semi-accurate Victorian look and then use removable accessories to make it "steamed" like a raygun on my hip, vintage goggles around my neck or on the hat...
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #4 on: January 02, 2018, 09:59:48 pm »

I type in 'steampunk girls' or 'steampunk boys' and I see various outfits, but these differ from victorian outfits or edwardian outfits. Are there terms for the vests and puffy shirts?

Another term for the vests would be waistcoats, but as  J. Wilhelm implied your clothing can be as historically accurate as you want, or not at all. Personally I tend to go with what might pass for a semi-accurate Victorian look and then use removable accessories to make it "steamed" like a raygun on my hip, vintage goggles around my neck or on the hat...

In it can be so inexpensive too, thanks to the likes of Goodwill and other second hand stores. Sometimes not looking for things, but "stumbling on them" is the best approach. Looking for a specific item can be so hard, when you realise that you're being too specific. "Building a look up" from found items is much easier and yields better results.

When I was looking for Lederhosen I just stopped looking after a while, and opened my mind to other fabrics. Then I stumbled onto a new pair of anachronistic black denim shorts. Then dressed up the look with a real black suede embroidered Lederhosen harness that I got for $15 (absolutely beautiful). These are factory rejects or replacement items. Then I got a black felt Trilby hat for a couple of dollars and made it look like a Bavarian hat and then morphed into a US Army style by applying proper gold rope and hand made military insignia matching the historical Cavalry garments. Better yet the garments are so durable, that they can be worn for every day occasions (the cloak coat and the suede gaiters for example).

The hand sewn finishes added a real authentic feel you can't get from "Steampunk" shops. Much easier than paying hundreds of dollars for an ill fitting authentic leather set, and infinitely better than a cheap costume imitation from one of those costume websites, which I wouldn't get caught wearing at a Halloween party, much less a Steampunk meeting.

That is not to say that there aren't good quality expensive novelty items out there, but if found they won't match the ideas you have in your mind. Not everybody wants a $400 Quasi-Regency-Era or 17Th. C. brocade tail coat, though they may be very impressive. You have to adapt to their ideas, and pay dearly for them.
« Last Edit: January 02, 2018, 10:45:19 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Kleven
Swab

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« Reply #5 on: January 19, 2018, 09:06:05 am »

cool. thanks guys.
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