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Author Topic: How do you describe Steampunk clothes?  (Read 551 times)
Kleven
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« on: January 02, 2018, 10:55:04 am »

I type in 'steampunk girls' or 'steampunk boys' and I see various outfits, but these differ from victorian outfits or edwardian outfits. Are there terms for the vests and puffy shirts?
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Kensington Locke
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« Reply #1 on: January 02, 2018, 03:18:00 pm »

I'm no clothing expert, but take yourself over to Steampunk Emporium.  It's an online clothing store.  No, I ain't shilling for them,

Browse around.  Look at the stuff and what they call it.  Read the blurbs explaining the origin.

It's not just a shop, it's a museum. Smiley
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #2 on: January 02, 2018, 06:45:43 pm »

So what makes clothing Steampunk, I guess is what you would have to think about. Unfortunately, when you type Steampunk you will first see all the commercial stuff with glued cogs and gears, or see all the sexy girls wearing mini bustles. Nothing wrong with that, but I prefer to describe Steampunk clothing as Victorian inspired clothing with a heavy dose of Science Fiction. In fact it does not have to be British Victorian. It can be American (eg Western) or Japanese (eg Meïji Era) or Mexican (eg Revolución Era) or German (eg Franco Prussian War period), or whatever suits your fancy. That means you can look for 19th century style clothing and modify it yourself, for a rather convincing Steampunk look. Otherwise you might find yourself buying really poor quality stuff - with a few gears attached.
« Last Edit: January 02, 2018, 06:51:25 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged

groomporter
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« Reply #3 on: January 02, 2018, 08:27:30 pm »

I type in 'steampunk girls' or 'steampunk boys' and I see various outfits, but these differ from victorian outfits or edwardian outfits. Are there terms for the vests and puffy shirts?

Another term for the vests would be waistcoats, but as  J. Wilhelm implied your clothing can be as historically accurate as you want, or not at all. Personally I tend to go with what might pass for a semi-accurate Victorian look and then use removable accessories to make it "steamed" like a raygun on my hip, vintage goggles around my neck or on the hat...
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« Reply #4 on: January 02, 2018, 09:59:48 pm »

I type in 'steampunk girls' or 'steampunk boys' and I see various outfits, but these differ from victorian outfits or edwardian outfits. Are there terms for the vests and puffy shirts?

Another term for the vests would be waistcoats, but as  J. Wilhelm implied your clothing can be as historically accurate as you want, or not at all. Personally I tend to go with what might pass for a semi-accurate Victorian look and then use removable accessories to make it "steamed" like a raygun on my hip, vintage goggles around my neck or on the hat...

In it can be so inexpensive too, thanks to the likes of Goodwill and other second hand stores. Sometimes not looking for things, but "stumbling on them" is the best approach. Looking for a specific item can be so hard, when you realise that you're being too specific. "Building a look up" from found items is much easier and yields better results.

When I was looking for Lederhosen I just stopped looking after a while, and opened my mind to other fabrics. Then I stumbled onto a new pair of anachronistic black denim shorts. Then dressed up the look with a real black suede embroidered Lederhosen harness that I got for $15 (absolutely beautiful). These are factory rejects or replacement items. Then I got a black felt Trilby hat for a couple of dollars and made it look like a Bavarian hat and then morphed into a US Army style by applying proper gold rope and hand made military insignia matching the historical Cavalry garments. Better yet the garments are so durable, that they can be worn for every day occasions (the cloak coat and the suede gaiters for example).

The hand sewn finishes added a real authentic feel you can't get from "Steampunk" shops. Much easier than paying hundreds of dollars for an ill fitting authentic leather set, and infinitely better than a cheap costume imitation from one of those costume websites, which I wouldn't get caught wearing at a Halloween party, much less a Steampunk meeting.

That is not to say that there aren't good quality expensive novelty items out there, but if found they won't match the ideas you have in your mind. Not everybody wants a $400 Quasi-Regency-Era or 17Th. C. brocade tail coat, though they may be very impressive. You have to adapt to their ideas, and pay dearly for them.
« Last Edit: January 02, 2018, 10:45:19 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Kleven
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« Reply #5 on: January 19, 2018, 09:06:05 am »

cool. thanks guys.
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Crescat Scientia
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« Reply #6 on: January 25, 2018, 05:05:54 am »

If one is looking for garments of the nineteenth century, Victorian or Edwardian are reasonable search terms to add to the clothing you are looking for.

Apart from that, there are decided vocabulary words which may help, such as spats, gaiters, ulster overcoat, inverness coat, burnoose, celluloid collar, waistcoat, morning coat, tailcoat, tea gown, kinsale cloak, top hat, trilby, shako, kepi, etc. depending on what you are looking for.

Vintage Dancer .com gathers and has links to various useful historic type clothing sales sites.
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« Reply #7 on: February 03, 2018, 07:26:13 am »

I have little to add to the excellent advice above, except to say that 'boys' and 'girls' included in your search terms may not help your results.  I just compared a search for 'steampunk boys' with 'steampunk gentlemen'. Very different results.

Unless, of course, your intention is to find clothes and accessories for children.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #8 on: February 05, 2018, 03:42:38 am »

I type in 'steampunk girls' or 'steampunk boys' and I see various outfits, but these differ from victorian outfits or edwardian outfits. Are there terms for the vests and puffy shirts?


I just realised that I did not answer your question directly. Perhaps a good approach is to make a list of keywords.

While Steampunk is not a re-enactment of the past, we do ofter wear clothing that could be accurate enough to be worn in re-enactment.

A great place to gawk at period clothing is the Arizona Historical Research Association (AzRA) page for reproduction clothing:

http://ushist.com

They have sections for military and civilian clothing.

You will find examples of garments for women (bustles, crinolines, petty coats, bloomers corsets and camisoles, to name a few), and for men (frock coat, great coat, tail coat, trousers, waist coats (vests), spats, etc. ), children (pinafore, breeches), plus all the military uniform terms as well (frock coat, shell jacket, fatigue blouse, etc.). All of this of course, is on the American side of things, but you can get a start.

Perhaps just look around and start looking for those keywords around the web. There's also online guides for period clothing.
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bicyclebuilder
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« Reply #9 on: February 05, 2018, 01:46:35 pm »

You have seen quite a few tips here in this thread, but I want to add my 2ct.

A puffy shirt is basically just a regular shirt with puffy add-ons. Imagine a plain long sleeve buttoned shirt with crocheted or lace placemats.

Also, according to Wikipedia: "A tailcoat is a coat with the front of the skirt cut away, so as to leave only the rear section of the skirt, known as the tails.". Basically, it's just that. A regular coat with the front cut off.

Although it's tempting to buy off the shelf clothes, it's sometimes easier than it looks. With a little handy sewing, a regular shirt or coat can look Steampunk.

I myself have made the mistake to make my first Steampunk/Victorian attire from scratch. A lot of work that could have been prevented with some creative thinking and a bit of alteration.


My favorite search engine for Steampunk (and creative stuff ingeneral) is Pintrest. If you find something you like, you can scroll down for more ideas like the one you've liked.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #10 on: February 09, 2018, 10:39:40 pm »

You have seen quite a few tips here in this thread, but I want to add my 2ct.

A puffy shirt is basically just a regular shirt with puffy add-ons. Imagine a plain long sleeve buttoned shirt with crocheted or lace placemats.

Also, according to Wikipedia: "A tailcoat is a coat with the front of the skirt cut away, so as to leave only the rear section of the skirt, known as the tails.". Basically, it's just that. A regular coat with the front cut off.

Although it's tempting to buy off the shelf clothes, it's sometimes easier than it looks. With a little handy sewing, a regular shirt or coat can look Steampunk.

I myself have made the mistake to make my first Steampunk/Victorian attire from scratch. A lot of work that could have been prevented with some creative thinking and a bit of alteration.


My favorite search engine for Steampunk (and creative stuff ingeneral) is Pintrest. If you find something you like, you can scroll down for more ideas like the one you've liked.


Good point

One tip for shirts is that Western "Bib Shirts" are extremely easy to make. Basically just any button-down shirt with a piece of fabric laid on top with buttons. You can even cheat and use snap buttons, which makes the project extremely easy.

For coats, Mr. Josecou started a coat modification thread:
http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,49038.0.html

The other tip is for hats. Look at this thread - which directs you to other hat threads in the Anatomical (where most clothing topics are posted):
http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,49523.0.html)


Most felt hats have something in common. It's very easy to buy a felt hat and convert it to another type of hat. Mr. Groomporter had posted this video elsewhere in Brassgoggles:

Historical hats


Cheers,
JW

« Last Edit: February 09, 2018, 10:41:43 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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