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Author Topic: Steamy projects for 2018?  (Read 2719 times)
Miranda.T
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #25 on: January 15, 2018, 08:51:58 pm »

I might add one more: build a model of a properly Gothic, or Neo-Gothic, structure, rather than a Gothic-decorated structure which is a simple set of boxes in actual construction, which is commonly used in geming terrain.

I love Gothic architecture - please do post pictures as and when!

My only project this year is actually more Dieselpunk but 'retro-fitted' as to be more Steampunk.
Imagine a WW2 Russian soldier at Stalingrad as imagined should WW2 have been pre-WW1.
It's a uniform with all the accessories (helmet, Telogreika jacket, Harovari trousers, boots, belts, ammo packs, PPSh-41...) but altered to look more Victorian/Edwardian than the period that followed which was not named for a monarch. Basically more 'bling and brass'.

As some people will know my 'maker skills' are limited by arthritis and other health issues but I still try.  Wink

I can sympathise; my mother suffered from arthritis. I hope that despite this hurdle your build goes well.

(snip)

In short, the rich idiot ruined all of the original character of the house, and all of the expensive restorations that had been done just a few years before. Gone is everything that made the house appealing.

So if you do go the the effort to restore a historic house, I advise you to put something in the deed to prevent subsequent owners from ruining it.

Cultural vandals like that should be burried in their own concrete. Just up to their ankles, you understand; that will keep them still whilst being pelted with rotten tomatoes.

I've got a couple oak boxes that I found that I've been toying with turning into a "campaign furniture" inspired idea with screw-on legs that get stored inside the box along with a minibar and a selection of games.

The concept is great, but addition of minibar and games is genius  Wink

Yours,
Miranda.
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James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #26 on: January 15, 2018, 10:07:48 pm »

I have one, big, project in mind.  I've had it in mind for several years and there's no real guarantee it will come to fruition this year either, but fingers crossed. 

I want to restore a Victorian or Edwardian house to something like it's 1905 appearance. 

It brings to mind something that happened in a town where I used to live.

There was an old house on Main Street, on a corner about two blocks from the business district. It was probably early 20th century, which is a respectable age for a house in a small midwestern town. It had large cast-concrete Roman style pillars out from, and if you mentioned "the house with the pillars" to anyone in town, they knew what your were talking about.

So in the late 80's, someone buys the house, which is a little run down at that point, and renovate it. They take out the old radiators and put in central air, and modernize the kitchen and bathrooms, but everything else is restored to a beautiful period look. Even the back yard has a turn-of-the century style flower garden. On July Fourth, the owner lines his sidewalk with little American flags. The home is featured in a local tour of homes.

Then the owner sells the house and moves to another town. Real estate is booming. The new seller splits off the back yard, which has a facing on the side street, and sells it to a builder who builds a new house on it. Gone is the beautiful back yard.

Then a young landscape company owner, who got rich quick in the housing boom buys the house. Within a week he hires a window contractor to remove those ugly old fashioned leaded windows and install nice new insulated fiberglass windows. He has those outdated roman columns removed, and and replaced with nice modern rectangular pillars. That ratty old wood lattice front porch was ripped out and replaced with a neat, clean, poured concrete block.

In short, the rich idiot ruined all of the original character of the house, and all of the expensive restorations that had been done just a few years before. Gone is everything that made the house appealing.

So if you do go the the effort to restore a historic house, I advise you to put something in the deed to prevent subsequent owners from ruining it.

That's almost criminal (I say 'almost' because there's always the argument that the owner can do pretty much as they please).  I'm not sure there is anything you can put into a house sale contract dictating what the new owner can/ can't do with the property, in the UK at least.  At least, not on the scale of an individual property- there are of course covenants and such like that control what colour you can paint a front door and prohibiting replacing windows with that awful uPVC stuff, but those are almost exclusively in localities like Conservation Areas and the like, or the building has to be Listed. 
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J. Wilhelm
╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
Board Moderator
Immortal
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United States United States


Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


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« Reply #27 on: January 16, 2018, 12:20:35 am »

I have one, big, project in mind.  I've had it in mind for several years and there's no real guarantee it will come to fruition this year either, but fingers crossed.  

I want to restore a Victorian or Edwardian house to something like it's 1905 appearance.  

It brings to mind something that happened in a town where I used to live.

There was an old house on Main Street, on a corner about two blocks from the business district. It was probably early 20th century, which is a respectable age for a house in a small midwestern town. It had large cast-concrete Roman style pillars out from, and if you mentioned "the house with the pillars" to anyone in town, they knew what your were talking about.

So in the late 80's, someone buys the house, which is a little run down at that point, and renovate it. They take out the old radiators and put in central air, and modernize the kitchen and bathrooms, but everything else is restored to a beautiful period look. Even the back yard has a turn-of-the century style flower garden. On July Fourth, the owner lines his sidewalk with little American flags. The home is featured in a local tour of homes.

Then the owner sells the house and moves to another town. Real estate is booming. The new seller splits off the back yard, which has a facing on the side street, and sells it to a builder who builds a new house on it. Gone is the beautiful back yard.

Then a young landscape company owner, who got rich quick in the housing boom buys the house. Within a week he hires a window contractor to remove those ugly old fashioned leaded windows and install nice new insulated fiberglass windows. He has those outdated roman columns removed, and and replaced with nice modern rectangular pillars. That ratty old wood lattice front porch was ripped out and replaced with a neat, clean, poured concrete block.

In short, the rich idiot ruined all of the original character of the house, and all of the expensive restorations that had been done just a few years before. Gone is everything that made the house appealing.

So if you do go the the effort to restore a historic house, I advise you to put something in the deed to prevent subsequent owners from ruining it.

That's almost criminal (I say 'almost' because there's always the argument that the owner can do pretty much as they please).  I'm not sure there is anything you can put into a house sale contract dictating what the new owner can/ can't do with the property, in the UK at least.  At least, not on the scale of an individual property- there are of course covenants and such like that control what colour you can paint a front door and prohibiting replacing windows with that awful uPVC stuff, but those are almost exclusively in localities like Conservation Areas and the like, or the building has to be Listed.  

My understanding is that the United States is a lot more nebulous than the UK in terms of building conservation. I'm part due to obvious reasons. Buildings in the US tend not to exceed the 200 year mark of age. A predominance of wood construction insures that houses will not last as long as masonry buildings, which writes off most residential buildings.

Also the attitude toward conservation will change greatly with geography. I imagine that the East and North East of the US will see a greater number of older conservable masonry buildings,due to historical reasons.

In Central Texas you will see a good number of Victorian Era homes and commercial buildings made from masonry, due to the availability of local limestone, and once they get the "Historical" status they are protected, according to regulations presumably set by the State as opposed to the city or county (the norm for residential permits). But otherwise a Victorian home is at risk of being renovated outside of the Victorian style.
« Last Edit: January 16, 2018, 12:23:13 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged

Synistor 303
Officer
***
Australia Australia


Zenyna Ironbracker


« Reply #28 on: January 16, 2018, 12:45:25 am »

I have one, big, project in mind.  I've had it in mind for several years and there's no real guarantee it will come to fruition this year either, but fingers crossed. 

I want to restore a Victorian or Edwardian house to something like it's 1905 appearance. 

It brings to mind something that happened in a town where I used to live.

There was an old house on Main Street, on a corner about two blocks from the business district. It was probably early 20th century, which is a respectable age for a house in a small midwestern town. It had large cast-concrete Roman style pillars out from, and if you mentioned "the house with the pillars" to anyone in town, they knew what your were talking about.

So in the late 80's, someone buys the house, which is a little run down at that point, and renovate it. They take out the old radiators and put in central air, and modernize the kitchen and bathrooms, but everything else is restored to a beautiful period look. Even the back yard has a turn-of-the century style flower garden. On July Fourth, the owner lines his sidewalk with little American flags. The home is featured in a local tour of homes.

Then the owner sells the house and moves to another town. Real estate is booming. The new seller splits off the back yard, which has a facing on the side street, and sells it to a builder who builds a new house on it. Gone is the beautiful back yard.

Then a young landscape company owner, who got rich quick in the housing boom buys the house. Within a week he hires a window contractor to remove those ugly old fashioned leaded windows and install nice new insulated fiberglass windows. He has those outdated roman columns removed, and and replaced with nice modern rectangular pillars. That ratty old wood lattice front porch was ripped out and replaced with a neat, clean, poured concrete block.

In short, the rich idiot ruined all of the original character of the house, and all of the expensive restorations that had been done just a few years before. Gone is everything that made the house appealing.

So if you do go the the effort to restore a historic house, I advise you to put something in the deed to prevent subsequent owners from ruining it.

Our house IS a 1980s house... Lowest common denominator building as far as we have seen. Low ceilings, the thinnest shortest skirting boards and the cheapest pine flooring. Built as fast as possible without a good bit of truely straigt wall. And it was beige - the carpet, the walls, the tiles, the kitchen cupboards, the skirting boards - the ceilings (beige due to old age). Bleh! We bought the house for the huge trees in the garden and we have renovated and put in lots of non-existent features. It looks much better now.
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Banfili
Zeppelin Captain
*****
Australia Australia



« Reply #29 on: January 16, 2018, 12:55:26 pm »

My house is 1967/8 weatherboard cottage, originally two bedrooms, but now with huge third triple-size bedroom out the back - the then owners had boarders.

I have already replaced the bathroom with a shower room, put an additional shower in the laundry (utility room), added a large deck, with ramp, out the back and built in the front verandah to make a sunroom. Nothing changes it from a weatherboard bungalow, though!!

I have started to remove the carpet - this is going to be an ongoing job for the next couple of months, as I cut it out bit by bit. Have discovered that the underlay is rubber backed with hessian, so have decided to leave that on the floor as a sort of weird floor covering, until I can afford to either seal and varnish the boards, or put down vinyl. The wooden bits from the carpet edge come up reasonably well with a pry bar, but I think the floorboards are hardwood - the nails stick a bit, and there are some small splits, so I don't think the carpet layers drilled holes first.
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Synistor 303
Officer
***
Australia Australia


Zenyna Ironbracker


« Reply #30 on: January 17, 2018, 12:30:35 am »

My house is 1967/8 weatherboard cottage, originally two bedrooms, but now with huge third triple-size bedroom out the back - the then owners had boarders.

I have already replaced the bathroom with a shower room, put an additional shower in the laundry (utility room), added a large deck, with ramp, out the back and built in the front verandah to make a sunroom. Nothing changes it from a weatherboard bungalow, though!!

I have started to remove the carpet - this is going to be an ongoing job for the next couple of months, as I cut it out bit by bit. Have discovered that the underlay is rubber backed with hessian, so have decided to leave that on the floor as a sort of weird floor covering, until I can afford to either seal and varnish the boards, or put down vinyl. The wooden bits from the carpet edge come up reasonably well with a pry bar, but I think the floorboards are hardwood - the nails stick a bit, and there are some small splits, so I don't think the carpet layers drilled holes first.

We were obliged to lay hardwood floorboards over the top of the existing pine floorboards as they were in a pretty bad way (never intended to be seen, so 'building quality' timber used). I then sanded and used a hard wax to finish the new timber (Tassie Oak). The hard wax had a dark tint in it, so the boards are dark, not too shiny and just lovely to walk on. The wax was fairly expensive, but it was a one coat finish, so actually worked out cheaper than a stain followed by 3 layers of poly (and easier on me too!). Also, there was very little smell, (and not a toxic smell) so we didn't have to move out for a week while the floor 'cured'. The wax could be walked on after 48 hours and furniture back in 12 hours after that. It's a dream to look after and looks like a beautiful old floor with a deep polish. We love it.

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Drew P
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


« Reply #31 on: January 20, 2018, 03:00:03 pm »

Would you mind posting up some pics of your waxed floor, please?

This sounds like a fantastic alternative so that I, too, can do it myself.
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Never ask 'Why?'
Always ask 'Why not!?'
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #32 on: January 23, 2018, 08:33:46 am »


Having recently discovered my home is  somewhat older than I thought, of the  pre war  interbellum era,  I have been researching  the original owner and use of the property.   For the most part  it was used as a dwelling and a corner shop  "dairy" as there are called in NZ.  Prior to that it may have been  the depot of the engineering firm owned by the  owners husband.   It was usual for married women of the time to own  property   independently, let alone have a dwelling built. There is still some mystery  to be found there. I haven't located any photos of the yet,  of the property
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Synistor 303
Officer
***
Australia Australia


Zenyna Ironbracker


« Reply #33 on: January 27, 2018, 06:02:59 am »

Would you mind posting up some pics of your waxed floor, please?

This sounds like a fantastic alternative so that I, too, can do it myself.


This gives a good idea of the shine. It actually improves with time.

Showing colour in sun and shade.

Probably a more 'true' idea of the colour (which is dark).
Upkeep - we sweep it. If there is something icky (we have two dogs and two grandkids) we mop it with whatever floor wash is at hand. It is now 4 years old and well used with little to no wear.
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Banfili
Zeppelin Captain
*****
Australia Australia



« Reply #34 on: January 27, 2018, 12:49:24 pm »

Well, the office sort has started for real! Got through quite a bit today. I have installed the portable air conditioner in the room, which made working in here today bearable! Just really making space & tidying up so far - the real work starts tomorrow. Uni starts next week, so a lot has to be done yet!

Lovely floor, Synistor, I would like mine to look like that, but not much chance of it in the immediate future.
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