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Author Topic: Steampunk Makeup, Hair, Tatoos and Other Finishing Touches  (Read 287 times)
J. Wilhelm
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« on: November 17, 2017, 10:10:17 pm »

Is there such a thing as Steampunk makeup? I don't remember if we have such a thread. I don't think we have a thread exclusively dedicated to finishing touches such as jewelry, hair face or body makeup (ie tattoos, scars, and the like). I'm thinking I might as well start a new thread dedicated to this, as I can't find a recent thread dedicated to bodily embellishments. The purpose would be to share any tips and opinions - whether it is ideas to fit a character, or historical trivia, costuming accessories, etc. Basically all the small finishing touches.


I'm wondering because at the moment I'm having a hard time developing the face makeup of my androgynous character, the Luftschiffengel ("Airship Angel"), Lt. Gen. J. W. Bahlmann, who is basically an original character who I have made to be an ancestor to, and is very loosely based on the Guild characters of the anime Last Exile who exist far, far in the future of humanity.


So I'll start the thread with a post below as soon as I get a break from work (I realize that a Friday evening will be generally a very slow day at Brassgoggles...). Or feel free to start posting right away regardless of the particular subject.

Your humble servant,

JW
« Last Edit: November 17, 2017, 10:12:22 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged

J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #1 on: November 18, 2017, 12:53:49 am »

What I’m trying to do:

I need some ideas to put the finishing touches on my character. So far I have a fairly complete uniform, but I will need to additional makeup to finish the character. The project is dead simple, but if I just follow the look from the anime that inspired me to create this character, I’ll just end up with white hair, pointy ears, “whiteface” paint and two yellow smudges in the corner of my eyes. Good for the anime. Bad for my novel. What I’m looking for is some perhaps pointers or new ideas. The character’s background is well developed by now, and what I need is a “look.”


~~~

My character, Lt. Ge. Julin Wodinaz Bahlmann


~~~


I love the Guilders’ elven androgyny, which inspired me while writing at the Queer geer, but in reality I’m creating the face for my historical character Lt. Gen. Julin Wodinaz Bahlmann. Basically an otherwise normal human being, who vaguely resembles an elf in the JRR Tolkien sense of the word, but rather than being a magic or nature oriented creature, this is a technically savvy and mechanically oriented human being. Because of the origin of my original character, namely Bahlmann is of Austrian *and* Hungarian (or entirely of Hungarian) descent, he may in fact (most likely) have some darkness/swarthiness on his skin, as opposed to a perfectly pale German complexion.

I have a rather swarthy appearance, as I have a rather complex ethnic background, and I have started to play with 3 golden shades of eyeshadow and eyeliner so as to try to emulate the yellow eye makeup of the Last Exile characters. I picked gold as a better alternative to the yellow “cake” at the corner of the eyes. I imagine the purpose of the yellow spots was to “elongate” the eyes, or give a bird-like appearance, but without interviewing the graphic novel's designer, Renji “Range” Murata, I am free to assume anything on my own.

As I discovered, this being my first time applying makeup, I have a couple of peculiar problems.

Firstly I have a rather pronounced and low hanging Epichantic fold. In other words, my eyes are very “Asian,” though I have no Asian ancestors that I know of. I’m assuming, based on photographs of my French great grandparents, that it came from the French Catholic/Jewish sides of my family, and I used to be complimented on the shape of my eyes when I was a small lad.


My French great grand parents circa 1890. Mr. Albert Levy and Mrs. Alfonsine, nee Guerrier, newlyweds



The second problem is that the fold of skin and the skin around the eyes is oily. I can wipe the skin clean with alcohol, but even then, there was a limited efficacy to the eyeliner pencils and crayons... Because -even worse- the skin around the eyes is *extremely* thin, making it almost impossible to drag a crayon or pencil and expect a well defined straight line, like I get if I draw a line on my forearm.  Undecided I bought a nice gold colour retractable pencil by NYX (almost like an ultra-thin hard lipstick in consistency), and a black pencil, also by NYX. Again, the black pencil only looks great on my forearm, but I don’t need it there Tongue The gold crayon is considerably more effective near the lash line, but rather blunt as you can’t sharpen it. It does work to make bigger features though, and I find easy to “shape” using a Q-tip with makeup remover (or hair conditioner as I found out).

So I turned to liquid eyeliner instead of pencils and I found a Master Precise - metallic "stellar sand" colour plus a traditional black liquid eyeliner pen from Maybelline. More difficult to apply these ultra-sharp pens will give me precise lines without effort as soon as I master a steady hand (!) Currently looking at tutorials online, which I found useful. In the mean time scouring the Pinterest boards looking for metallic eye makeup ideas.


The last thing that happened yesterday, is that per chance I found an inexpensive rose-gold coloured liquid eyeshadow by E. L. F. (rather appropriate name) . I found this product to be the easiest and nicest looking of all the others. While it doesn’t give the strong antique gold tone of the NYX crayon, it does give you a very blendable and definitely golden tone. The colour is basically pink with golden fleck. So it disappears and vanishes into the eye lid rather easily. When the eye is open the shadow concentrates” in colour giving me a strongly defined “eyeliner effect,” neatly defined because of the epicanthic fold. When I close my eyes you can see a much lighter vanishing shade… So this is where I’m at. I just need some ideas thrown in my direction. Now I need to do the rest. My plans are to possibly use several metallic shades Since I have 3 shades so far, a silver-ish barely brown liquid eyeliner, an old gold retractable crayon and a rose gold liquid eye shadow. Grin Any opinions welcome, as I'm just having fun...


My eye with Rose Gold liquid shadow by ELF


Rose Gold liquid eye shadow (top), gold crayon (middle), "stellar sand" liquid eyeliner (bottom)


I'm not necessarily looking for this as the application seems a bit crude, but this called my attention on Pinterest



~~~


The concept for Guilders according to Last Exile. Last heir to the position of Maestro, Keeper of the Guild, Lord Dio Eraclea (Version 1) and Master Dio (Version 2).






Manipulation by artist Mezamero from DeviantArt of a real portrait to match the physical appearance of a Guilder (Maestro Dio, Version 2), this gives a much more realistic look of the look envisioned by the creators of Last Exile.


From Mezamero at DeviantArt https://mezamero.deviantart.com/
Original portrait of MeanGenie at DeviantArt  https://meangenie.deviantart.com/art/4-109287173




~~~

** NOTES
Origin, Physical Appearance and Religion of Guilders according to my concept and the anime's concept.

As a quick recap, Bahlmann comes from my tentative novel The Valkyrie and the Eagle . Ze (as opposed to "he") is meant to be one of the ancestors of the genetically engineered race of Guild members in the Last Exile animé franchise, though I won't explicitly state that origin in my novel. I consider my character an original character because it completely precedes the existence of the animated characters, by many centuries. In my novel, the Guild is known as the Guild of Icarus, and the Guild is created sometime in the 1870s.

CLICK SPOILER FOR DETAILS

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Cheers,
JW







« Last Edit: November 20, 2017, 08:26:06 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Miranda.T
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« Reply #2 on: November 18, 2017, 02:38:18 pm »

Dear Admiral Wilhelm,
Playing with makeup is fun  Cheesy And there is the key point - is does take a lot of experimentation or 'playing' to find what really works best for you. It is so dependent, for example, on the shape of the eyes and their separation relative to the size of the face - the latter changes if you go from dark at the inner corner to light on the outside or vice verse. Basically, any colour scheme is supposed, with the shape of the eye and face, to give the impression of the 'wide eyed' look. There are indeed plenty of tutorials online so do look to those; I must admit I'm no expert on that, I just know what works (or I hope works) for my face but that's about it.

Definitely liquid eyeliner for the top lid (I always find a pencil just pulls too much). One thing I find that helps with applying it is to always work from the corners (both outer and inner) in to the middle. You may find a pencil works under the lower lid, though. However, I find that unless you do have naturally very wide eyes a full dark line under the lower lid tends to be counterproductive and make the eyes look smaller; a 1/3 line from the outer corner (or even just extending the eyeshadow colour here) can be more flattering. You haven't mentioned mascara; eyeliner allways looks a little ineffectual without some mascara to define the lashes.

Colours for the eyes... of course the classic 'go to' colors for Steampunk are shades of brown and, as you are using, gold. I feel brown mascara and eyeliner works better than black (it gives a rather softer tone). Of course more generally the usual rules apply for matching makeup to clothes colour, so depending on what's worn that could be purples, greens, blues, deep reds... Probably not so much use for pastels or baby-doll pinks, though!

I always tend to go for quite deep lipstick colours as I feel with all the other visual distractions of a steamy outfit going on they need a some bold colouring or otherwise they get 'lost' in the whole ensemble, but that's just a matter of personal taste.

Jewellery... so much choice! There are of course all the custom made pieces one finds at the Steampunk trade stalls, and many of those are wonderfully designed, but anything that's Victoriana will of course fit (which is very much back in fashion for costume jewellery, particularly around Christmas) and plenty of the Goth designs are fine too. I think it's a case of more is more, so for example if you can't decide between which of three necklaces to wear, well, wear them all! I also feel broaches and badges always work well, maybe because they are not in fashion for normal wear.

Yours,
Miranda.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #3 on: November 18, 2017, 11:29:24 pm »

Dear Admiral Wilhelm,
Playing with makeup is fun  Cheesy And there is the key point - is does take a lot of experimentation or 'playing' to find what really works best for you. It is so dependent, for example, on the shape of the eyes and their separation relative to the size of the face - the latter changes if you go from dark at the inner corner to light on the outside or vice verse. Basically, any colour scheme is supposed, with the shape of the eye and face, to give the impression of the 'wide eyed' look. There are indeed plenty of tutorials online so do look to those; I must admit I'm no expert on that, I just know what works (or I hope works) for my face but that's about it.

Definitely liquid eyeliner for the top lid (I always find a pencil just pulls too much). One thing I find that helps with applying it is to always work from the corners (both outer and inner) in to the middle. You may find a pencil works under the lower lid, though. However, I find that unless you do have naturally very wide eyes a full dark line under the lower lid tends to be counterproductive and make the eyes look smaller; a 1/3 line from the outer corner (or even just extending the eyeshadow colour here) can be more flattering. You haven't mentioned mascara; eyeliner allways looks a little ineffectual without some mascara to define the lashes.

Colours for the eyes... of course the classic 'go to' colors for Steampunk are shades of brown and, as you are using, gold. I feel brown mascara and eyeliner works better than black (it gives a rather softer tone). Of course more generally the usual rules apply for matching makeup to clothes colour, so depending on what's worn that could be purples, greens, blues, deep reds... Probably not so much use for pastels or baby-doll pinks, though!

I always tend to go for quite deep lipstick colours as I feel with all the other visual distractions of a steamy outfit going on they need a some bold colouring or otherwise they get 'lost' in the whole ensemble, but that's just a matter of personal taste.

Jewellery... so much choice! There are of course all the custom made pieces one finds at the Steampunk trade stalls, and many of those are wonderfully designed, but anything that's Victoriana will of course fit (which is very much back in fashion for costume jewellery, particularly around Christmas) and plenty of the Goth designs are fine too. I think it's a case of more is more, so for example if you can't decide between which of three necklaces to wear, well, wear them all! I also feel broaches and badges always work well, maybe because they are not in fashion for normal wear.



Dear Miranda, thank you for the tips. Indeed I heard that using liner on the whole lower lash line will close the eyes. And given the epicanthic fold I can't do very thick lines on the upper lash line either... I was thinking of using a lighter shade on the bottom 1/3 as you suggest, basically following my own lashes. The black eyeliner really contrasts too much though it could be used exclusively on the upper lash, and very thin.

I'm experimenting because the "stellar sand" has a more silver than gold tone. Both the sand and the black are only suitable for thin lines. The crayon fills much better but applies better well outside the eye. So my thoughts are to use the gold crayon to do the corner "smudges first, and then blend the rose gold shadow (which blends much easier than the crayon). I might look for copper shadow instead of the rose gold.

The gold was to emulate the yellow used I  the animated characters, as somehow I think it'd be more interesting. The champagne corset in the uniform I thought ties to the color on the eyes. The mascara coupling with the liner makes sense. I'll look at it later.

I'm not sure about the lipstick just yet. I'm inclined toward pinkish colours and making the bottom lip lighter. This in observation of my own natural colours. I realised that the pink tones just blend much better into the skin, though my skin tone is not pink at all except for the cheeks.
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« Reply #4 on: November 19, 2017, 05:12:22 am »

not much use for the eyes but a long time ago a did a fake dueling scar with a piece of red thread and some super glue. a dab of glue on the end of the thread and touch it to where you want the scar to start and then pull it somewhat tight to the direction you want it to run, then a dab of glue where you want it to end. cut off the excess string and you get a thin red scar with a dent an some puckers around it. luckily I had oily skin at the time and it picked loose a while later with only major effort Roll Eyes  I didn't think of it then but that brush on clear bandage might have worked better even if to just fix the thread itself down in the middle. that and a monocle and its off to the races.
I'd seen my sister doing makeup on others and she seemed to use art paint brushes to apply a lot of it, may not be much use applying it to yourself. heck I used to buy those big poofy blush brushes in bulk at the dollar store to do drybrushing on builds, and just throw them away before they fell apart.

what if you use a darker color like a bit of blue above the metallics to highlight them? more like mr spock on  star trek, but way more subtle? I'm talking just under and even in the eyebrow itself.
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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #5 on: November 19, 2017, 09:35:40 am »



  "the natural look"  can take longer to apply and use more make up.  Though Mr Wilhelm , I suspect this is what you are  aiming for.  Its a matter of finding the right foundation base then layering and  blending the colors over the top.  Inspiration and tutorials can be found in fashion magazines, books, on line and YouTube.  Explore  the Retro and vintage looks. Steampunk is set in the victorian and edwardian era, eyes appeared less dramatic, cheeks and lips were rouged.  The Silent Movie  make up  could  be worth  researching here, mens and womens.

 The other options are having a make over at the local beauty counter and having a good  chat with the sales lady about it, thy really know their stuff.  Then there is  volunteering to be a model  at the  make up artistry  classes  in the community , they do the different era and look, including wounds  and scars , one can learn a lot from that.

 I have the Epichantic  folds in a milder form , probably for the same reason you do. There is good advice out there  about dealing with that dilemma,  shading and blending  eye shadow in the creases and  and mounds  of the upper lid can do wonders.




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Miranda.T
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« Reply #6 on: November 19, 2017, 12:52:03 pm »

(snip)

I might look for copper shadow instead of the rose gold.

(snip)

Ohh, a metallic copper eyeshadow sounds just the ticket. In the run-up to Christmas there should be plenty of these 'party' colourings (for want of a better word) in the shops.

not much use for the eyes but a long time ago a did a fake dueling scar with a piece of red thread and some super glue. a dab of glue on the end of the thread and touch it to where you want the scar to start and then pull it somewhat tight to the direction you want it to run, then a dab of glue where you want it to end. cut off the excess string and you get a thin red scar with a dent an some puckers around it. luckily I had oily skin at the time and it picked loose a while later with only major effort Roll Eyes  I didn't think of it then but that brush on clear bandage might have worked better even if to just fix the thread itself down in the middle. that and a monocle and its off to the races.
I'd seen my sister doing makeup on others and she seemed to use art paint brushes to apply a lot of it, may not be much use applying it to yourself. heck I used to buy those big poofy blush brushes in bulk at the dollar store to do drybrushing on builds, and just throw them away before they fell apart.


If you want to make a more extensive scar (open wound type), crinkled tissue paper and/or cling film coated and adhered with liquid latex works well. You can colour it with normal cosmetics (colouring from lipsitck pots work very well) and, if needed, bulk it out with solid mouldable latex. We used this quite a few years ago for Zombie outfits to a Halloween party, and that's when I discovered I have a latex allergy. On removing the fake angry red skin patches I found underneath I had real angry red skin patches...

Oh, and a selection of good makeup brushes and applicators definitely does make all the difference.



  "the natural look"  can take longer to apply and use more make up.  Though Mr Wilhelm , I suspect this is what you are  aiming for.  Its a matter of finding the right foundation base then layering and  blending the colors over the top.  Inspiration and tutorials can be found in fashion magazines, books, on line and YouTube.  Explore  the Retro and vintage looks. Steampunk is set in the victorian and edwardian era, eyes appeared less dramatic, cheeks and lips were rouged.  The Silent Movie  make up  could  be worth  researching here, mens and womens.


Absolutely; trying to achieve the flawless 'as though not wearing makeup' look is probably the hardest type of makeup scheme to perfect. Another set of tuorials to look up there could be bridal ones, as those looks tend to be more subtle.

Yours,
Miranda.
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Cora Courcelle
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« Reply #7 on: November 19, 2017, 07:19:42 pm »

Even on the eyelids you need foundation before you start applying anything else.  It smooths things out and makes a good base as well as helping to stop the eye shadow 'clumping' into the natural folds.  You don't need much and you need one that matches your skin - and that's NOT the skin on your hand, which is nearly always much darker; (this advice does not necessarily apply to vampires) really you should choose something a smidgeon lighter.  Once the foundation is on you've got more of a blank canvas to work with and just experiment and have fun.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #8 on: November 19, 2017, 07:34:20 pm »

SNIP
what if you use a darker color like a bit of blue above the metallics to highlight them? more like mr spock on  star trek, but way more subtle? I'm talking just under and even in the eyebrow itself.

What I have seen on Pinterest (search for "gold eye makeup") is dark brown as a substrate extending all over the lid and then blending the gold over it. Seems to work well.

 SNIP
 I have the Epichantic  folds in a milder form , probably for the same reason you do. There is good advice out there  about dealing with that dilemma,  shading and blending  eye shadow in the creases and  and mounds  of the upper lid can do wonders.

I agree. You just have to work with it. It's not that much of a dilemma though, it's just tricky. I just start applying colour in "two modes" that is basically eyes open and eyes closed, and then blend. Based on my observation the blending of two colours can result in a graduated colour when your eyes are closed and a sharp step in colour when your eyes are open. So the choice of "substrate" colour is important because you need a colour that looks good (like I wrote above, brown and gold). Namely when the eyelid is open the lower colour next to the lash line is so thin that it looks like a sharp thick line made with eyeliner. (see picture above - the rose gold almost is invisible on the eyelid as it just vanished into a pink tone, but when the eye lid opens, the pink subsides and gold suddenly appears concentrated on the lash line - most of the eyelid is folded. What you will see above that and below the eyebrow is a shade of brown. The eye lids are "bimodal. "

(snip)

I might look for copper shadow instead of the rose gold.

(snip)

Ohh, a metallic copper eyeshadow sounds just the ticket. In the run-up to Christmas there should be plenty of these 'party' colourings (for want of a better word) in the shops.

 "the natural look"  can take longer to apply and use more make up.  Though Mr Wilhelm , I suspect this is what you are  aiming for.  Its a matter of finding the right foundation base then layering and  blending the colors over the top.  Inspiration and tutorials can be found in fashion magazines, books, on line and YouTube.  Explore  the Retro and vintage looks. Steampunk is set in the victorian and edwardian era, eyes appeared less dramatic, cheeks and lips were rouged.  The Silent Movie  make up  could  be worth  researching here, mens and womens.

Absolutely; trying to achieve the flawless 'as though not wearing makeup' look is probably the hardest type of makeup scheme to perfect. Another set of tuorials to look up there could be bridal ones, as those looks tend to be more subtle.

Yours,
Miranda.

That is a good pair of ideas. Bridal make-up is far more subtle. And historical concepts of beauty have changed greatly over time, though I don't know how that would play into this ancient group of people, as I'm thinking those markings worn by the Engelfolk are very much a "tribal" type of marking, which will set them apart from regular people. Much speculation has been made in recent years on the subject of what ancient Germanic peoples actually looked like, as far as body tattoos and hair etc. Maybe some research into that? If anything were looking at a folkloric look. There are original pictures on folkloric looks from the 19th C. Maybe blend tribal with 19th C trachten?

« Last Edit: November 19, 2017, 07:43:17 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #9 on: November 19, 2017, 07:35:54 pm »

Even on the eyelids you need foundation before you start applying anything else.  It smooths things out and makes a good base as well as helping to stop the eye shadow 'clumping' into the natural folds.  You don't need much and you need one that matches your skin - and that's NOT the skin on your hand, which is nearly always much darker; (this advice does not necessarily apply to vampires) really you should choose something a smidgeon lighter.  Once the foundation is on you've got more of a blank canvas to work with and just experiment and have fun.

What about the so called "primer" for eyeshadow?

(snip)

I might look for copper shadow instead of the rose gold.

(snip)

Ohh, a metallic copper eyeshadow sounds just the ticket. In the run-up to Christmas there should be plenty of these 'party' colourings (for want of a better word) in the shops.

SNIP

I forgot to tell you that yesterday, I found 3 metallic colours in liquid form from E. L. F.  They have copper, the rose gold and pure gold. I purchased the gold as well (pictures will follow  soon). To be honest there was not much difference between the rose gold and the copper, save the rose gold is more red and copper is more orange. So I refrained from getting the copper. Apparently this liquid form of eyeshadow is new. It just came out.

At just $4 per vial, that is a very good deal, and the versatility of the liquid is unmatched by pens. The gold is substantially lighter than the gold crayon show above. Basically the ELF shade looks like " new gold" almost champagne, as opposed to "antique gold" in the NYX crayon.

An actual piece of copper next to the rose gold and the gold Elf shadows.
We can just say that the gold tone is "brass powder"  Wink Grin
I'll do a test using rose gold and blending into gold


« Last Edit: November 19, 2017, 08:26:07 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #10 on: November 20, 2017, 01:37:21 am »

Saw this, thought of you.

http://www.steampunkfashionguide.com/p/steampunk-makeup.html
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« Reply #11 on: November 20, 2017, 02:10:05 am »



Thank you. Indeed. Makeup is around us, and we do it without thinking, yet I don't see many people talking about it (at least not recently) . It's like we expect it, or take it for granted.

SNIP
what if you use a darker color like a bit of blue above the metallics to highlight them? more like mr spock on  star trek, but way more subtle? I'm talking just under and even in the eyebrow itself.


What I have seen on Pinterest (search for "gold eye makeup") is dark brown as a substrate extending all over the lid and then blending the gold over it. Seems to work well.

SNIP


Here's one example from Pinterest:



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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #12 on: November 20, 2017, 05:17:42 am »

A very entertaining history of cosmetics in ancient Rome

I was scourging the Internet on the subject, when I stumbled on this article:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cosmetics_in_Ancient_Rome

Quote
Cosmetics in Ancient Rome
 
There have been many artifacts and ancient Egyptian renderings of Egyptian cosmetic use long before Rome was a proper civilization. As such we can say with certainty that cosmetics originated in Egypt not Rome. Cosmetics, first used in Ancient Rome for ritual purposes,[1] were part of daily life for women, especially prostitutes and the wealthy. Some fashionable cosmetics, such as those imported from China, Germany and Gaul, were so expensive that the Lex Oppia tried to limit their use in 189 BCE.[2] These “designer brands” spawned cheap knock-offs that were sold to poorer women.[3] Working-class women could afford the cheaper varieties, but may not have had the time (or slaves) to apply the makeup[4] as the use of makeup was a time-consuming affair because cosmetics needed to be reapplied several times a day due to weather conditions and poor composition.

Cosmetics were applied in private, usually in a small room where men did not enter. Cosmetae, female slaves that adorned their mistresses, were especially praised for their skills.[6] They would beautify their mistresses with cultus, the Latin word encompassing makeup, perfume and jewelry.[7]
Scent was also an important factor of beauty. Women who smelled good were presumed to be healthy. Due to the stench of many of the ingredients used in cosmetics at the time, women often drenched themselves in copious amounts of perfume.

Christian women tended to avoid cosmetics with the belief that they should praise what God gave them.[9] Some men, especially cross-dressers, did use cosmetics, although it was viewed as effeminate and improper.

All cosmetic ingredients were also used as medicines to treat various ailments. Lead, although known to be poisonous, was still widely used.[7]

But now I read about the attitude of men toward cosmetics...  Roll Eyes

Quote
Men's attitudes toward cosmetics

Roman attitudes towards cosmetics evolved with the expansion of the empire. The assortment of cosmetics available increased as trade borders expanded and the resulting influx of wealth granted women additional slaves and time to spend on beauty. Ideas of beauty from conquered peoples, especially the Greeks and Egyptians, greatly influenced the Roman paradigm of beauty.[10] Unlike their eastern trading partners however, the Romans felt that only the “preservation of beauty” was acceptable and not “unnatural embellishment”. Despite exaggerating their makeup to make it appear in the poor lighting of the time, women still wanted to appear natural as a sign of chastity. Artificiality denoted a desire to be seductive, which made men question for whom exactly a woman was trying to appear attractive. This was why men generally viewed the use of cosmetics as deceitful and manipulative.[11] Vestal Virgins did not don makeup because they were supposed to look holy and chaste. Postumia, one of the Vestal Virgins, defied this convention and consequently, was accused of incestum.

Of all the surviving texts mentioning cosmetics (all written by men) Ovid is alone in his approval of their use. The consensus was that women who used cosmetics in excess were immoral and deceptive and were practicing a form of witchcraft. Juvenal wrote that “a woman buys scents and lotions with adultery in mind” and mocked the need for cosmetics, believing that they were ineffective. Use of perfumes was further looked down upon because they were thought to mask the smell of sex and alcohol. Seneca advised virtuous women to avoid cosmetics, as he believed their use to be a part of the decline of morality in Rome. Stoics were also against the use of cosmetics, as they were opposed to the usage of all man-made luxuries. Although there are no surviving texts written by women expounding the attitude of women towards cosmetics, their widespread use indicates that women accepted and enjoyed these products.

Wow. Pretty negative, huh? What a rotten attitude...  Huh There must be something else other that just artificial morality rules... To see why keep on reading....

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Skincare
Pure white skin, a demarcation of the leisure class, was the most important feature of Roman beauty.[7] Native Roman women weren’t naturally fair-skinned and spent their time outside with oils on their faces, requiring whitening makeup to fit their model of beauty.

Women would often prepare their faces with beauty masks prior to applying makeup. One recipe called for the application of sweat from sheep's wool (lanolin) to the face before bedtime,[14] emitting a stench often criticized by men.  Other ingredients included juice, seeds, horns, excrement,[16] honey, plants, placenta, marrow, vinegar, bile, animal urine, sulfur, vinegar, eggs, myrrh, incense, frankincense,[17] ground oyster shells,[18] onions with poultry fat, white lead, and barley with vetch. Bathing in asses’ milk was an expensive treatment that worked like a chemical peel and was used by wealthy women such as Cleopatra VII and Poppaea Sabina.

After their baths, they would then apply face whitener, such as chalk powder,[20] white marl, crocodile dung and white lead.[7] The Roman recognition that lead was poisonous underscored their point of view on how important white skin was. Other ingredients used

Alright... I think I'm starting to see what the real problem was...  Roll Eyes  You come into bed wearing crocodile dung, the cat's urine, vinegar and sulphur, and I might have a problem with that  Grin

~ ~ ~

Now to the relevant part:

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Rouge

Although Romans esteemed pale faces, a light pink on the cheeks was considered to be attractive, signifying good health. Plutarch wrote that too much rouge made a woman look showy, while Martial mocked women, believing that rouge was in danger of melting in the sun.[4] Sources of rouge included Tyrian vermillion,[10] rose and poppy petals, fucus,[23] red chalk, alkanet, and crocodile dung.[24] Red ochre, a more expensive blush, was imported from Belgium and ground against a stone into powder.[17] Despite a widespread knowledge that cinnabar and red lead were poisonous, they were both still used extensively.[7] Cheap alternatives included mulberry juice and wine dregs.

Eye makeup

The ideal eyes, from the Roman perspective, were large with long eyelashes. Pliny the Elder wrote that eyelashes fell out from excessive sex and so it was especially important for women to keep their eyelashes long to prove their chastity.

Kohl was the main ingredient in eye makeup, and was composed of ashes or soot and antimony, with saffron usually added to improve the smell. Kohl was applied using a rounded stick, made of ivory, glass, bone, or wood, that would be dipped in either oil or water first, before being used to apply the kohl.[7] The use of kohl as makeup came from the east. In addition to kohl, charred rose petals[26] and date stones could be used to darken the eyes.

Colored eyeshadow was also applied by women to accentuate their eyes. Green eyeshadow came from poisonous malachite, while blue came from azurite.

The Romans preferred dark eyebrows that almost met in the center. This effect was achieved by darkening their eyebrows with antimony or soot and then extending them inward.[3] Plucking began in the 1st century BCE to tidy their overall look

"Gladiatrice" by Xa-Xa-Xa a/k/a Gueuzav at Deviantart.com
She'll chop your head off but will do it wearing perfect face makeup.
(Note the gladius' hilt, helmet's crest, arm/leg/chest bands all match her eyes and eyeshadow)
https://xa-xa-xa.deviantart.com/art/Gladiatrice-651687544

« Last Edit: November 20, 2017, 06:04:39 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #13 on: November 21, 2017, 01:43:03 pm »

What about the so called "primer" for eyeshadow?



I have always used foundation, but the reviews for the e.l.f. primer do look good and the price is certainly reasonable so I may have a go with it just to see what it's like. By the way, don't forget that you should be replacing mascara and eyeliner every 4 to 6 months or you run the risk of getting an eye infection.  If you ever do get one anyway you should bin the lot as eye make-up is a happy little breeding ground for nasties!  (Another reason not to spend a fortune on make-up).
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« Reply #14 on: November 21, 2017, 08:08:50 pm »

What about the so called "primer" for eyeshadow?



I have always used foundation, but the reviews for the e.l.f. primer do look good and the price is certainly reasonable so I may have a go with it just to see what it's like. By the way, don't forget that you should be replacing mascara and eyeliner every 4 to 6 months or you run the risk of getting an eye infection.  If you ever do get one anyway you should bin the lot as eye make-up is a happy little breeding ground for nasties!  (Another reason not to spend a fortune on make-up).

I'm keenly aware of that as I got a feeling of how exposed the eye is to makeup especially when cleaning it with an oil based makeup remover (as you're supposed to do).

In other news, I found a tutorial about how to apply shadow for people with epicanthic folds.

https://www.bforbunbun.com/tutorial-where-to-apply-contour-eyeshadow-color-on-an-asian-eye/

In summary, most tutorials tell you to apply dark shadow in the crease of the eye to create the illusion of deep set eyes. The problem with that is that the epicanthic fold is well below the contour of the eye socket. Most Western tutorials assume the eye socket and the crease are in the same place. In eyes with an epicanthic fold, the crease either occurs slightly above the lash line in "double lid" eyes - or - in case of a strong epicanthic fold there is no visible crease at all ("mono lid" eyes). I learned this from that Asian blogger I link above. Apparently about 50% of East Asian population have a double lid and 50% have a mono lid.

My eye is closer to the double lid.

"Double lid" eye with light epicanthic fold
Found in about 50% of East Asian population

In either case applying dark shadow to the crease is pointless,because the crease and the "contour line" are not in the same place. The crease is far below the contour line which actually is the edge of the eye socket.

The way to do it is to find the contour of the eye socket (by pressing softly with a Qtip and using the eye socket to apply the dark shadow. The rest of the eyelid, including crease should be light coloured, and you can  blend with your eyes semi-closed. When open, there will be a discontinuity between the upper eyelid's shadow and the light shadow on the area above the lash line and below the crease, if you have a double lid. In other words, you need to plan for a "second eyeliner" layer. You will have a dark faded shade above the crease, abruptly changing to a colour shadow below the crease when your eyes are open. The "second eyeliner" shadow will be above a conventional dark or black eyeliner right on the lash line. But when you close your eyes, the three separate colour shades (dark contour and bright colours on crease and lower lid) will blend softly into one another, fading all the way between the black liner to the brow edge, looking more like what you see in most Western tutorials.

Most tutorials don't mention any of this at all, and just assume you will have a vanishing shade on your eyes when open (see golden shadowed eye two posts above). That is not possible. As a consequence, I see a lot of Asian girls just using eyeliner, or eyeliner plus a very thin colour band of shadow since most of the colour is only visible when the eyes are closed. Many of the types of techniques you see on Pinterest et al, are impossible to wear with an epicanthic fold.

Bottom line, you have to make a choice between the "no eyeshadow look" or faking a crease line.

To be honest, given that I'm looking at making a somewhat "tribal" makeup around the eye, and thus there will be a  lot of colour anyways, and because I practically have no space beween my contour (eye socket) and my brows, I may forgo the upper dark eyeshadow altogether, or just look at doing a really light dark, barely visible contouring above the metallic shadow to accentuate my natural inset. I'll be looking for Elf brand dark brown shadow and the primer you mention to apply and blend around the eye socket, but the shadow will be very thin as my eyes are already very inset (as I grew older my eyes set back into my sockets. I used to have very bulbous eyes when I was a kid).

The problem after mastering the basics is I have develop the eye corners to achieve that Guilder look.


I think this lets me clarify my situation. The pink line is the boundary of the eyelid shadow colour. Above that optionally you'd have a contour line for dark shadow, but there is not much room for that. The yellow line is the boundary of the "tribal" design. The brown lines are the approximate boundaries of the dark eyeshadow to be faded upwards and darkened downwards. The black line is the boundary of the eyeliner:

« Last Edit: November 22, 2017, 07:21:28 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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