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Author Topic: Can anyone help identify this old fan?  (Read 232 times)
Steamworkshop
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« on: September 29, 2017, 03:26:59 pm »

I found this at the flea market.

I've googled "Galvin" and they produced communications equipment from 1927 to 1947 before becoming Motorolla. They produced a lot of comm equipment for the US Army in WWII.

It looks like Galvin took a GE motor and ILG fans to make the part they needed. I can't make out the Galvin part# though. Some if it is scraped away.  I'm guessing it was a cooling fan for a piece of Army comm equipment. It's painted OD green.

Not surprisingly, it works fine and moves a lot of air despite being over 70 years old. It just needs a new cord. I'd like to steam it up a little and use it in my shop. I don't want to touch it till I find out if it's collectible though.

Does anyone know how the fans are attached to the shafts? It looks like some sort of rivet or pressed fitting in the end of the shaft. I took a closeup pic.










« Last Edit: September 29, 2017, 03:32:17 pm by Steamworkshop » Logged

Hektor Plasm
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« Reply #1 on: September 29, 2017, 10:51:31 pm »

Nice find! It looks huge in the first photo.

Sorry I can't throw any light on it - I know your pain though; should I hack this up, or auction it?

I tend to just use it, perhaps after a cleanup, just to put my mind at rest. At least it is happy then, doing it's job - that's how I reconcile it . Smiley.

It would look good with an appropriate paint job - older than it actually is; unless you go... Dieselpunk...  Shocked

(sorry)

HP
 
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Banfili
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« Reply #2 on: September 29, 2017, 11:51:14 pm »

Tut, tut, Hektor, that was a bit naughty!  Grin

It does look like an interesting object, and much smaller than I first thought - mind you, if I had looked more carefully at the background and seen the valve and the roll of solder ...!
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Steamworkshop
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« Reply #3 on: September 30, 2017, 06:04:34 am »

Ha! I'm not above going a bit diesel with it. I do work as a mechanic so...

Maybe a bit of a Diesel/Steam crossover since it's already Diesel.

I'm thinking, polish the fan housings to look like twin turbos then cut some cracks into them. Build a new capacitor cover from brass and copper with a curved glass window looking inside.  Replace the dark green band with a thick copper band. There's a lot that could go on here.

Any ideas about how to remove the fan from the shaft? I'll have to do that to remove the housings. It looks like some sort of round wedge that flares the end of the shaft. like a hammer head. It's not a screw or rivet.

I posted on another forum I frequent that has some military guys but it's not a military forum. None of them seem to know either. Most of them aren't that old. It's probably something only an old tech would recognize anyway unless they're a collector. 
« Last Edit: September 30, 2017, 06:12:55 am by Steamworkshop » Logged
Otto Von Pifka
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« Reply #4 on: October 01, 2017, 04:37:54 am »

looks to me that there is a flat on the shaft in the pics, there may be a set screw holding the fan blade to the shaft
try to look into the exhaust tube and spot a hole in the blade body, where a screw may be hiding.

the shaft end looks too uniform to be a pressed rivet end and while I've seen that sort of thing on fan shafts, I don't think the military would go so cheap a route purchasing equipment like that

looks very much like a conical center hole used to balance the shaft and motor before assembly, which is why something like this can last 70+ years to begin with!

I would try to remove the end guards and see what actually is going on inside the fan shroud. who knows, there might be access to four more screws holding the shroud to the motor casing and the shroud might fit over the blade without any fuss.
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Cmdr. Storm
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« Reply #5 on: October 01, 2017, 08:27:15 am »

This Might sound Nuts but, Check to see if the fan Was Used by the US Navy during WW2. Looks Similar to Units Used on US Navy Subs during the second World War! Hope this Helps.
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Drew P
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« Reply #6 on: October 01, 2017, 01:30:23 pm »

I've got the modern version of that, it was used to ventilate a communications equipment rack in the 90s.
I threw a handle on it and use it on job sites. Blows like crazy and sounds like it, too, but it is a job site so noise is everywhere.
I've never cleaned it so I'll be watching.
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