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Author Topic: Our Steampunk Buildings- "Steamy Steampunk Buildings" spin-off thread  (Read 294 times)
James Harrison
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Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« on: September 24, 2017, 11:22:09 am »

A few weeks ago it was mentioned in the "Steamy Steampunk Buildings" thread that we don't, as such, have a thread dedicated to buildings and structures of our own that we consider steampunk.  I mean drawings, sketches, models and the0 like- even up to sheds, conservatories, outhouses and so on. 

So this is the thread to remedy that. 

As an opening submission, I have recently been drawing up a design that leans very heavily upon this for inspiration. 



What 'this' is, is Watson Fothergill's studio and office in Nottingham city centre, built in the mid-1890s.  Watson Fothergill being a Gothic architect of note who basically built large chunks of Victorian Nottingham. 

After going through two or three iterations I eventually ended up with a drawing I was happy with. 



And yesterday I was able to cut the first material for the 4mm (1:76) scale model I'll be building of it. 
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Persons intending to travel by open carriage should select a seat with their backs to the engine, by which means they will avoid the ashes emitted therefrom, that in travelling generally, but particularly through the tunnels, prove a great annoyance; the carriage farthest from the engine will in consequence be found the most desirable.
Miranda.T
Zeppelin Captain
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United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #1 on: September 26, 2017, 06:32:27 pm »

Very nice; will the model be added to your railway layout? And if so I hope there will be in situ pictures too  Smiley.

Yours,
Miranda.
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J. Wilhelm
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Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


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« Reply #2 on: September 26, 2017, 06:52:24 pm »

My house in Mexico City was not Victorian, and I'd not call it Steampunk, but by virtue of having a 4 storey high rock-lined underground tunnel to the street level garage, it'd already have a "gold mine" or "pirate" Steampunk look to it. The outside of the house also sported a birdcage elevator to bypass the tunnel to the garden level 4 storeys above the street. That could be Steampunk.

Sadly I have no photographs of the house. I only have a view from the street in Google Maps, which I have posted before in this forum. The house was on top of a hill and made up of multi level rooms vaguely resembling Swiss Chalets but made in brick and concrete. Hopefully the whole structure was not damaged in this last earthquake. Back in 2013, a satellite photo of the house, suspiciously showed no flat surface where the tennis court used to be. About 1/2 storey higher than the garden level I mention. Behind it, you see, was a very large retention wall, because the hill continued above our house. We were not at the peak of the hill, thus there's a small possibility that the neighbours' garden above our house may have collapsed onto our tennis court.

From
http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,37460.msg850159.html#msg850159
http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,37460.msg809383.html#msg809383
« Last Edit: September 26, 2017, 06:59:49 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged

James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #3 on: September 26, 2017, 07:00:50 pm »

Very nice; will the model be added to your railway layout? And if so I hope there will be in situ pictures too  Smiley.

Yours,
Miranda.


Eventually, that is the plan.  In the long (very long!) term future. 

My house in Mexico City was not Victorian, and I'd not call it Steampunk, but by virtue of having a 4 storey high rock-lined underground tunnel to the street level garage, it'd already have a "gold mine" or "pirate" Steampunk look to it. The outside of the house also sported a birdcage elevator to bypass the tunnel to the garden level 4 storeys above the street. That could be Steampunk.

Sadly I have no photographs of the house. I only have a view from the street in Google Maps, which I have posted before in this forum. The house was on top of a hill and made up of multi level rooms vaguely resembling Swiss Chalets but made in brick and concrete. Hopefully the whole structure was not damaged in this last earthquake. Back in 2013, a satellite photo of the house, suspiciously showed no flat surface where the tennis court used to be. About 1/2 storey higher than the garden level I mention. Behind it, you see, was a very large retention wall, because the hill continued above our house. We were not at the peak of the hill, thus there's a small possibility that the neighbours' garden above our house may have collapsed onto our tennis court.

From
http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,37460.msg850159.html#msg850159
http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,37460.msg809383.html#msg809383


That's really impressive!
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J. Wilhelm
╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
Board Moderator
Immortal
**
United States United States


Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #4 on: September 26, 2017, 10:21:31 pm »

Very nice; will the model be added to your railway layout? And if so I hope there will be in situ pictures too  Smiley.

Yours,
Miranda.


Eventually, that is the plan.  In the long (very long!) term future.  

My house in Mexico City was not Victorian, and I'd not call it Steampunk, but by virtue of having a 4 storey high rock-lined underground tunnel to the street level garage, it'd already have a "gold mine" or "pirate" Steampunk look to it. The outside of the house also sported a birdcage elevator to bypass the tunnel to the garden level 4 storeys above the street. That could be Steampunk.

Sadly I have no photographs of the house. I only have a view from the street in Google Maps, which I have posted before in this forum. The house was on top of a hill and made up of multi level rooms vaguely resembling Swiss Chalets but made in brick and concrete. Hopefully the whole structure was not damaged in this last earthquake. Back in 2013, a satellite photo of the house, suspiciously showed no flat surface where the tennis court used to be. About 1/2 storey higher than the garden level I mention. Behind it, you see, was a very large retention wall, because the hill continued above our house. We were not at the peak of the hill, thus there's a small possibility that the neighbours' garden above our house may have collapsed onto our tennis court.

From
http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,37460.msg850159.html#msg850159
http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,37460.msg809383.html#msg809383


That's really impressive!


In Mexico, civil engineers and architects are automatically licensed, and they don't need (at least back in the 1970s) a construction permit. My grandfather was a civil engineer and worked as a public works estimator during the day and at night in a private firm also as an estimator. He asked permission from the owner of the private firm, and diverted a number of resources, like trucks, men, I-Beams and pre-tensed concrete foam slabs, for the ceilings, and he got a hold of surplus basalt rock boulders (what you see in the garage), from large public work projects to line the whole tunnel.

The whole house was 1970s "Brady Bunch" type architecture  Grin Massive wall to wall picture windows. 7-mm trapezoidal smoked glass panes over mahogany and aluminium frames (worth a fortune now and impossible to get). He could pull rabbits out of a hat that way because of his contacts. You see he worked as an angineer since 16 years of age, because his father was Mexico's "Civil Engineer General" a presidential appointment office in the Federal Public Works Department in the 1930s.

I imagine the new owner covered the master bedroom windows in brick (see picture above) because she had a flock of small kids and was afraid they'd crash through the glass and fall to the street.
« Last Edit: September 26, 2017, 11:05:17 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
chironex
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The typing jellyfish monster


« Reply #5 on: October 05, 2017, 07:14:10 am »






All free papercrafts from Ravensblight.
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James Harrison
Immortal
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England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #6 on: October 05, 2017, 07:22:23 pm »






All free papercrafts from Ravensblight.

 Shocked 

Very nice.
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