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Author Topic: Seeking Sewing Machine Recommendations for Canvas (cotton duck)  (Read 228 times)
Rushing's Rarities
Zeppelin Captain
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Formerly "superbill22"


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« on: July 28, 2017, 09:13:37 pm »

Hey folks,

First off, I've been away a while, my apologies.

Secondly, and to the point, I'm in the market for a sewing machine and I'd specifically prefer the ability to sew through a few layers of canvas. I was hoping for some recommendations on machines. I understand that people are brand loyal but objective recommendations would be preferable.

As for price range, I'm looking for something $350 usd or less but not opposed to spending a little more for the right features.

Many thanks in advance.
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ForestB
Zeppelin Admiral
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United States United States

Lady of the copper frogs


« Reply #1 on: July 29, 2017, 05:05:37 am »

Well I'm a sucker for a vintage machine myself, both of my sewing machines are older Singers. The reason I like the old ones is the fact that they have all metal gearing and can be found in thrift stores or garage sales for cheap. My 237 Fashion Mate can sew through garment weight leather with the right type of needle, and I found it for thirty dollars at Goodwill.
  As for the newer ones, I would go online and read some reviews to find what sort of bells and whistles you want in a sewing machine....
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Synistor 303
Gunner
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Australia Australia


Zenyna Ironbracker


« Reply #2 on: July 29, 2017, 08:26:51 am »

There are industrial type sewing machines that would sew through canvas - you see them on ebay from time to time. They are used to sew boat sails etc. For home use, it is the needle which is the important bit to get through canvas. If you want the heavy stitching of the sort that shows, I would machine sew using a needle designed for going through canvas then hand sew the bigger stitches. Just go slowly, as the needle will snap if you try to push it through too quickly. I have 3 machines (and an overlocker) all different brands. Just look for a good sturdy machine that is in good condition and a bit older. The older ones tend to be stronger and more reliable because they were build with mostly metal parts and only did a limited number of 'fancy' stitches so fewer bits to go wrong. Big, heavy, old and in good condition.
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river rat
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Gambler. Grave Robber. All around fun guy.


« Reply #3 on: August 03, 2017, 07:03:49 pm »

Totally agree with Synistor. I've snapped a few needles.... : )

I would think any quality sewing machine will work. Use the proper needles. They make heavy duty needles and use a heavy thread. Not the same stuff you would use to sew together light cottons and the like. I have an old Singer. Early 70's. Ive used it to slowly sew some heavy fabrics together. I do have to hand help it go through corners. So I don't stress the machine. I really don't have a brand to offer. Only advice from a power tool owner. I go by this simple rule. "Cheep tools are expensive to use." Buy quality and only buy what you need. Don't pay for expensive hype you'll never use. If you have a price range then go for a machine that's purposely designed for what you want to do. It'll handle all your regular needs as well.

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river rat
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United States United States

Gambler. Grave Robber. All around fun guy.


« Reply #4 on: August 15, 2017, 07:09:51 pm »

I'm biting the bullet here because my old sewing machine has broke down. I'm getting a Singer 4423 heavy duty machine. It's designed to sew multi layers of canvas, jean and leather. My old 1970's Singer bogs down. Even with the right needles it has problems with more than 4 layers of bluejeans material. I'm a cosplayer. Not a real sewer. I've only used two stitches in my entire life. Straight and zig zag.

I've never used this machine so there's no way I can recommend it. And I'm going against my own motto and getting something cheap. Because I can get it quick and need it now.
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Miranda.T
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United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #5 on: August 16, 2017, 12:13:37 pm »

We really put our '80s vintage Toyota machine to the test last year sewing new canvas to extend our trailer tent's canopy. The things we learned from this were to, as noted above, have the right needles, also to have a very strong thread (otherwise it will be breaking every few moments no matter how slow you go) and, if it's a large and heavy piece of material, you need two people to manoeuvre it around - taking as much pull off the needle as possible really helps.

Yours,
Miranda.
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river rat
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United States United States

Gambler. Grave Robber. All around fun guy.


« Reply #6 on: September 23, 2017, 06:54:11 am »

After using the Singer heavy duty 4423 I'd have to say I really like it. It sews very heavy seams. Things my old Singer would not go through.
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