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Author Topic: Futurism In Steampunk  (Read 428 times)
chicar
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« on: July 11, 2017, 10:58:45 pm »

Disclaimer: Not to confuse with retro-futurism in steampunk.  Tongue

The place of art-deco in steampunk have been already discussed here, but what about futurism ?  His invention is found withinn the steam age (or at least my personal opinion on his lenght ).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Futurism
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Futurist_architecture
http://www.art.com/gallery/id--c24103/futurism-prints.htm

What do you think ?
« Last Edit: July 13, 2017, 12:38:12 am by chicar » Logged

The word pagan came from paganus , who mean peasant . Its was a way to significate than christianism was the religion of the elite and paganism the one of the savage worker class.

''Trickster shows us how we trick OURSELVES. Her rampant curiosity backfires, but, then, something NEW is discovered (though usually not what She expected)! This is where creativity comes from—experiment, do something different, maybe even something forbidden, and voila! A breakthrough occurs! Ha! Ha! We are released! The world is created anew! Do something backwards, break your own traditions, the barrier breaks; destroy the world as you know it, let the new in.''
Extract of the Dreamflesh article ''Path of The Sacred Clown''
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #1 on: July 12, 2017, 05:02:11 am »

When you say Futurism, it has a very specific meaning n the context of the Italian (and European) Futurism movements, as opposed to what you or I as denizens of the late 20th C and early 21st C believe about futurism (lower case "f").

A problem I see in Steampunk is that our anachronism is a distillation of the *perception* of contemporary people on what the past meant to them. In other words, I'm very gingerly trying to say - without insulting anyone-  that it is founded often on stereotypes and the lack of knowledge that we modern people have on the past, which greatly influences what artistic genres are recognized into the "mainstream" Steampunk and Dieselpunk movements.

Quite simply the architectural styles of Art Deco in Dieselpunk and Art Nouveau in Steampunk, are better understood than the fine art genre of Impressionism, Italian Modernism or even Cubism. Why? Simply because we contemporary people tend to be very ignorant on the history of fine art and a little bit less ignorant on the history of architecture. How many Steampunks do you know who are fans of impressionism or cubism? But the terms "Art Deco" and "Art Nouveau" resonate a lot more among us. It's because we have been exposed to some styles at some point and not to others. And I wouldn't be surprised if Steampunk is the reason many of us have even heard and begun to understand such terms. To put it bluntly Steampunk is an educational tool for many of us, whether it be art history or actual history.

I have often complained that Classical (e.g. Mozart) and Romantic (e.g. Beethoven) Period music are not appreciated enough among Steampunks, and thus actual 19th. C. music tends to be painfully absent in the "Steampunk music" we play and hear in our circles. I'm afraid this is a function of education and experience in the type of music, plain and simple. Our ranks simply have not been exposed to the musical genre of the period to be able to use it and incorporate it in our anachronisms.

The same applies to trans-Atlantic cultural concepts such as the difference between European and American art, music or architecture. Many people from across the pond may have heard the terms "Ragtime Music" and "Honky Tonk" before, but it is likely that they first understood what the term actually meant by reading about it here at Brassgggles... For people across the Atlantic it less likely that they would have ever heard the title "Prarie School of Architecture," but rather they would be well acquainted to the Arts and Crafts movement. The converse is true for Americans; Arts and Crafts would be a little understood term.

On Ragtime and Honky Tonk
http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,46293.0.html

On Arts and Crafts, Art Nouveau and the difference to Art Deco
http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,43763.0.html

So to answer your question, Italian Futurism is just as valid as any other period movement. But it lies on your hands to expose it and teach your Steampunk colleagues about it.
« Last Edit: July 12, 2017, 05:52:14 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged

RJBowman
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« Reply #2 on: July 12, 2017, 06:36:07 pm »

When people talk about futurism in steampunk, they might be talking about this kind of thing:


https://www.amazon.com/Futuredays-Nineteenth-century-Vision-Year-2000/dp/0863691609
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chicar
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« Reply #3 on: July 13, 2017, 12:37:30 am »

Yay, i was slightly fearing such a confusion. Should have put a disclaimer. Wink
« Last Edit: July 13, 2017, 12:43:38 am by chicar » Logged
RJBowman
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« Reply #4 on: July 13, 2017, 01:37:33 am »

So what sort of futurism were you speaking of? Alvin Toffleresque social change?
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chicar
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Student in Techno-Shamanism and Lyncanthrope

Chicar556
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« Reply #5 on: July 13, 2017, 01:01:05 pm »

Italian futurism, look at the link in my first post.
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RJBowman
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« Reply #6 on: July 13, 2017, 03:49:59 pm »

Italian Futurism was an art movement that seems to be related to cubism and emphasizes depiction of motion.  I don't see much of that in steampunk.
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morozow
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« Reply #7 on: July 13, 2017, 05:58:54 pm »

Futurism may refer to steam-punk in terms of punk.

In any case, Russian futurism. Russian futurism, in contrast to the Italian, was more literary direction. Representatives of Russian futurism was characterized by leftist and anti-bourgeois beliefs.

Its main features:

 - rebellion, anarchy world, the expression of the mass sentiment of the crowd;

- the negation of cultural traditions, an attempt to create art, looking to the future;

- a revolt against the usual norms of poetic speech, the experimentation in the field of rhythm, rhyme, focus on the spoken verse, slogan, poster;

- the quest for emancipation "samovitogo" words, experiments on creation of "intellectual" language.

If there is in the setting of steam-punk opposition of the aristocracy and lower classes. There can be futurism in the Russian form. I think so.
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Sorry for the errors, rudeness and stupidity. It's not me, this online translator. Really convenient?
RJBowman
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« Reply #8 on: July 13, 2017, 07:46:08 pm »

An Italian Futurist Cityscape:


It has a Deco look to it, which is just a few years past the era that Steampunk most often draws from, but the massive urban setting and the airship could appeal to steampunk enthusiasts.

Here's a neat one:

It's biplanes over a town; possibly an aerial bombardment. Suggestive of the first world war.

The shapes in the paintings remind me of this:

Aelita: Queen of Mars.
This was a early Soviet era film. Basically, things had settled down in Russia under the Lenin government. The Soviet government was discovering that there was a benefit to allowing some free enterprise to take place. The someone said "Hey, remember back before the revolution when Russian art didn't suck? Why don't we allow one of the old directors that we forced into exile to come back into Russia to make more movies."

So Yakov Protazanov came back to Russia and made a big-budget science fiction film, in 1924, three years before Fritz Lang made Metropolis. The sets and costumes definitely have that Italian Futurist look to them. The film was popular upon release, but eventually shifts in the Politbureau policies resulted in this film being banned, and it wasn't shown again until after the fall of the Soviet Union. I first saw it circa 1990, when I found a VHS cassette for sale in a drug store in my hometown in Michigan; I didn't know much about the history of the film, but I liked the design of the martians and their city; a sort of proto-Metropolis.

Looking at all of these images makes me think that the Art Deco style was derived from Italian Futurism, with some possible influences from Art Nouveau.
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morozow
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« Reply #9 on: July 14, 2017, 12:53:04 am »

An Italian Futurist Cityscape:


It has a Deco look to it, which is just a few years past the era that Steampunk most often draws from, but the massive urban setting and the airship could appeal to steampunk enthusiasts.

Here's a neat one:

It's biplanes over a town; possibly an aerial bombardment. Suggestive of the first world war.

The shapes in the paintings remind me of this:

Aelita: Queen of Mars.
This was a early Soviet era film. Basically, things had settled down in Russia under the Lenin government. The Soviet government was discovering that there was a benefit to allowing some free enterprise to take place. The someone said "Hey, remember back before the revolution when Russian art didn't suck? Why don't we allow one of the old directors that we forced into exile to come back into Russia to make more movies."

So Yakov Protazanov came back to Russia and made a big-budget science fiction film, in 1924, three years before Fritz Lang made Metropolis. The sets and costumes definitely have that Italian Futurist look to them. The film was popular upon release, but eventually shifts in the Politbureau policies resulted in this film being banned, and it wasn't shown again until after the fall of the Soviet Union. I first saw it circa 1990, when I found a VHS cassette for sale in a drug store in my hometown in Michigan; I didn't know much about the history of the film, but I liked the design of the martians and their city; a sort of proto-Metropolis.

Looking at all of these images makes me think that the Art Deco style was derived from Italian Futurism, with some possible influences from Art Nouveau.

I'm sorry, but I'll be tedious. I apologize if I misunderstood something, and I will fight with windmills.

1) Art after the revolution did not "suck". The 20th was a time of bold experiments and searches in the field of art. The scenery of the film in the style of "constructivism" is perfectly illustrated.

2) No one drove Protazanov out of the country. He left himself with the studio. Destroyed by civil war, the country is not the most convenient place for living and working.

3) Aelita was not a banned film. But he was considered a weak, unsuccessful film. Therefore, it was not shown to a wide audience.

P.S. One of the creators of costumes in the film "Aelita", Alexandra Exter 1924-1925, participated in the design of the Soviet pavilion at the XIV International Exhibition in Venice and the preparation of the exhibition of the Soviet Department of the World Exhibition of Contemporary Industrial and Decorative Art ("Art Deco") in Paris.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #10 on: July 15, 2017, 01:05:46 am »

Italian Futurism was an art movement that seems to be related to cubism and emphasizes depiction of motion.  I don't see much of that in steampunk.

For that read my post above  Grin
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