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Author Topic: What not to do around steampunks you meet on cons  (Read 1276 times)
James Harrison
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« Reply #25 on: July 08, 2017, 12:06:02 pm »

I think what it boils down to is, basically, treating people with a degree of respect. A good rule of thumb would be to treat people how you expect to be treated yourself..... don't want to be stopped in the street, prodded, poked, taken as an art performance?  Don't treat others like it then....

~~~

I'm reminded of a humourous happenstance, probably a decade ago now, in which a good friend of mine (a Chap, not a steampunk) had a hand.  The Chaps, you see, have an annual weekend outing to Oxford around St George's Day, part of which consists of a picnic and a sojourn down the river in a collection of punts and small rowing craft. 

Well, they'd gone down the river and hauled out for the picnic and suddenly find themselves surrounded by a group of your typical urban types, who promptly start pulling out early smartphones and taking photos and bombarding them with idiot comments and questions and the like. 

My friend, and his friends, then pull out their smartphones and cameras and whatnot and start replying with slightly foolish questions of their own.  "Oh, you're wearing a tracksuit- have you run here from town?  How long did that take?  Do you come running along here everyday?  What about when it rains- do you come running along here then?  How fit are you if you come running here every weekend- how far out from town are we?"

It's something that I usually remember only after having provided the local mouthbreathers and backchat comedians a halfhour or so of amusement.   
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annevpreussen
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United States United States


Captain Annemarie of the Eagle's Arrow Airship


« Reply #26 on: July 09, 2017, 04:10:46 pm »

I think what it boils down to is, basically, treating people with a degree of respect. A good rule of thumb would be to treat people how you expect to be treated yourself..... don't want to be stopped in the street, prodded, poked, taken as an art performance?  Don't treat others like it then....

~~~

I'm reminded of a humourous happenstance, probably a decade ago now, in which a good friend of mine (a Chap, not a steampunk) had a hand.  The Chaps, you see, have an annual weekend outing to Oxford around St George's Day, part of which consists of a picnic and a sojourn down the river in a collection of punts and small rowing craft. 

Well, they'd gone down the river and hauled out for the picnic and suddenly find themselves surrounded by a group of your typical urban types, who promptly start pulling out early smartphones and taking photos and bombarding them with idiot comments and questions and the like. 

My friend, and his friends, then pull out their smartphones and cameras and whatnot and start replying with slightly foolish questions of their own.  "Oh, you're wearing a tracksuit- have you run here from town?  How long did that take?  Do you come running along here everyday?  What about when it rains- do you come running along here then?  How fit are you if you come running here every weekend- how far out from town are we?"

It's something that I usually remember only after having provided the local mouthbreathers and backchat comedians a halfhour or so of amusement.   
That's a really good way to respond! I'm with you; I usually only think of a witty response or comment long after the moment has passed. Good for your friends for turning it back around on the gawkers!

I personally don't mind being stopped and asked to be photographed if I'm dressed somehow out of the norm. One of the cons I go to is in the middle of a big city and a lot of cosplayers are on public transport along with normal people going about their business. A lot of them ask to take photographs or video, just because it's so unusual. I know it's also fairly common in big cities for fashion people to ask random well-/interestingly-dressed people for photos. I think it's wonderful when people are curious and inquisitive about why we wear what we wear (my mission is to convert as many normies to steampunk as possible, haha), as long as they're not rude and don't take sneaky pics to put on twitter or something.
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Cora Courcelle
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England England



« Reply #27 on: July 10, 2017, 05:10:22 pm »

Perhaps we should all rehearse a few 'spontaneous' remarks for use in various situations - thus enhancing our reputations as erudite, witty persons who are never at a loss for an apt phrase.  And yes, I realise that sentence would probably need to be translated for some of the morons who think they're funny as they demand to know "wotchu dressed like that for mate", but some people are really interested and it's a pleasure to chat to them; some have even ended our conversations with "Thank you, you've made my day".  Photographs?  Well I've spent quite a lot of time and effort assembling my attire and I'm always delighted when it is appreciated.
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Major Wolfram Quicksilver
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« Reply #28 on: July 10, 2017, 06:39:13 pm »

*Wearing tropical khaki and pith helmet*

"Oi mate, that's an army uniform, you in the army or what?"

"And that's a football shirt you're wearing. What position do you play for Manchester United?"

And to finish:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f11HE6-UbKw&t=7s
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Caledonian
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« Reply #29 on: August 19, 2017, 08:49:25 pm »

....

.......

Try to explain them what steampunk is.



Obviously i KNOW
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CyanideCandy
Deck Hand
*
Poland Poland


« Reply #30 on: September 09, 2017, 12:17:22 am »

I totally agree with most of what you've said.
But myself I wouldn't mind that much if someone asked me about "what cosplay?" or "are you playing in a theatre/movie?" That's ok with me. I simply answer that I'm dressed as myself or something like that. People are just curious. But I understand that it may become annoying if they bother you too much so you can't move around as quickly as you'd like to or even talk to your friends for 5 minutes without interruptions. It really depends on a situation. But in my experience people just stare more often than ask anything at all. Or they just throw some compliments.   But apart from dressing in various subcultural or amachronistic outfits as my self-expression, I'm also taking part in 19-the century photography reconstructions, I'm a mime and a performance artist. However for performance I don't usually dress in steampunk - I often go for the aesthetics which is either neutral or highlighting my action. Doesn't matter.
Getting back to the main topic. Someone mentioned photography.. I really don't like it if someone takes pictures and then posts them around without giving a proper credit to the "models" or even without asking first.
I also hate the creepy or sexual comments.Maybe to some people these days "sexy" is a compliment but to me it is not. Especially since my style is actually quite modest and not revealing much body and I am genderless.. I'm not dressing this way to tease anyone or to attract this kind of attention.
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annevpreussen
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United States United States


Captain Annemarie of the Eagle's Arrow Airship


« Reply #31 on: September 09, 2017, 11:25:52 pm »

Cyan, you're a mime??? That's so cool! I know almost zero things about mime (and if we're being completely honest one of the only reasons I know anything is because Dresden Dolls sent me down a wikipedia hole a while back), but I think that it looks very pretty.

And yeah, creepy comments are... not good. The only times I'm okay with being called sexy or similar at cons is if it's by someone cosplaying the love interest of whoever I'm cosplaying or someone cosplaying the same character as me. Everything else is skeevy as heck. Note to all convention photographers: the way to get a strange girl to pose for you is not by calling her a "sexy nerd" and then getting angry when she refuses.
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CyanideCandy
Deck Hand
*
Poland Poland


« Reply #32 on: September 10, 2017, 12:14:33 am »

Cyan, you're a mime??? That's so cool! I know almost zero things about mime (and if we're being completely honest one of the only reasons I know anything is because Dresden Dolls sent me down a wikipedia hole a while back), but I think that it looks very pretty.

And yeah, creepy comments are... not good. The only times I'm okay with being called sexy or similar at cons is if it's by someone cosplaying the love interest of whoever I'm cosplaying or someone cosplaying the same character as me. Everything else is skeevy as heck. Note to all convention photographers: the way to get a strange girl to pose for you is not by calling her a "sexy nerd" and then getting angry when she refuses.

Yea.. I've been introduced to this by my friend who is worlds better than me at acting and stuff.. And he's a dancer. And a mime for 12-13 years already.. And myself I'm not professional at all but I'm trying to at least go beyond what many so called "street mimes" do -so just relying on a single static costume. I create new costumes/characters each summer and try to move in the manner that suits them. But so far they were mostly put together quickly of some thrift shop finds and this year I am adding more of diy little by little.. I hope to have them all handmade next year so the progress continues.. I love interacting with people then. I try to improve each year (this summer was the third season I do this). And although I have quite a busy life (I could probably say hard but this may sound like.. I don't know.. I hate to rant or admit such things.) and little time, I decided to do some serious physical exercises this year. I'd love to turn it into a more serious theatrical mime acting. But this will require much work.
There was even a situation during my classes this year in June.. We got a course on teaching special needs children and we had a guest to one of these lessons- a lady who presented some very basics of the sign language. And while we were trying to repeat her gestures she said "ohh wow someone even got the mimics" (which she mentioned before as an important part of this kind of communicating). I was doing this quite intuitively. So I read this situation as a very good sign.
Generally my life is a struggle and masochistic tendencies do not help but then I cannot decide on one hobby or passion as well so I end up "doing it all against all odds"
Am I talking too much?
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chironex
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The typing jellyfish monster


« Reply #33 on: September 10, 2017, 04:45:51 am »

*Wearing tropical khaki and pith helmet*

"Oi mate, that's an army uniform, you in the army or what?"

"And that's a football shirt you're wearing. What position do you play for Manchester United?"

And to finish:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f11HE6-UbKw&t=7s


I just thought of this when I read that:
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J. Wilhelm
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Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


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« Reply #34 on: September 13, 2017, 07:11:04 pm »

Well, yeah. I guess people should not harass cosplayers, but THAT assumes that people are asking the question maliciously and on full knowledge of what you really are (cosplayer or Steampunk or what have you). But what if they really don't know?

While I don't believe anyone could possibly mistake me for something other than a Steampunk or re-enactor (depending on their level of subculture exposure), there is some danger that someone out there is taking the craft a bit more seriously than you are. Luckily I've never been challenged to a real duel before...
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Hez
Zeppelin Captain
*****
Canada Canada


aka Miss Primrose C Leigh


« Reply #35 on: September 13, 2017, 10:40:08 pm »

Most people who have asked about a costume/outfit that I wear have been genuinely curious and reasonably polite.  I find that politely explaining steampunk either satisfies or intrigues most of them.  
In such cases rude or violent responses only make our subculture seem boorish, the antithesis of splendid.

Rudeness in others can be met with education if unintended ("Please don't take photos without asking my permission, I know you mean it as a compliment but it is actually quite rude")
If the rudeness is intended then please do win the battle of wits for the sake of those of us who don't think of responses until later.

The creepy/sexy comments deserve every possible putdown and the people who make such remarks to someone wearing an accurate Victorian reproduction gown are the same creepy lowlifes who will harass someone in jeans and a T-shirt.  If they are allowed to do so their behaviour will get worse and more dangerous.

PS Steampunk are the only cons I have been to but I have found people there to be almost universally generous and welcoming.  I am sorry to hear that others have had different experiences.
« Last Edit: September 13, 2017, 10:42:10 pm by Hez » Logged
J. Wilhelm
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Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #36 on: September 13, 2017, 10:56:35 pm »

And let's not forget the current political climate. Even if you are a Steampunk, wearing a Civil War, Union or Confederate uniform might get you in trouble! Hurricane Harvey as well as the violent events in Charlottesville, interrupted a far-right rally in College Station (Texas A&M University between Houston and Austin), and a pro - Confederate History Preservation Group in Austin! I don't suppose that without the Hurricane it would have been remotely wise to get dressed in period uniform while the protestors/counterprotestors were at each other's throats. I can't imagine the questions and heckling some perfectly innocent Steampunk would receive!
« Last Edit: September 13, 2017, 11:07:08 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Prof Marvel
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United States United States


learn from history, or be doomed to repeat it


« Reply #37 on: September 19, 2017, 05:39:11 am »

Perhaps we should all rehearse a few 'spontaneous' remarks for use in various situations -........

"Hello. My name is Inigo Montoya. You killed my father. Prepare to die."

https://youtu.be/6JGp7Meg42U

Can we? please?

Pretty Please?

yhs
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« Reply #38 on: September 22, 2017, 10:10:25 pm »

And let's not forget the current political climate. Even if you are a Steampunk, wearing a Civil War, Union or Confederate uniform might get you in trouble! Hurricane Harvey as well as the violent events in Charlottesville, interrupted a far-right rally in College Station (Texas A&M University between Houston and Austin), and a pro - Confederate History Preservation Group in Austin! I don't suppose that without the Hurricane it would have been remotely wise to get dressed in period uniform while the protestors/counterprotestors were at each other's throats. I can't imagine the questions and heckling some perfectly innocent Steampunk would receive!

That's a good point.  I was prepping an article on Steampunk (and general) costume etiquette right before Harvey and Charlottesville, and tweaked it when I thought of some of the ramifications of certain costumes and saw at least one con outright banning Nazi/original Hydra costumes.

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J. Wilhelm
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Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #39 on: September 23, 2017, 04:53:09 am »

And let's not forget the current political climate. Even if you are a Steampunk, wearing a Civil War, Union or Confederate uniform might get you in trouble! Hurricane Harvey as well as the violent events in Charlottesville, interrupted a far-right rally in College Station (Texas A&M University between Houston and Austin), and a pro - Confederate History Preservation Group in Austin! I don't suppose that without the Hurricane it would have been remotely wise to get dressed in period uniform while the protestors/counterprotestors were at each other's throats. I can't imagine the questions and heckling some perfectly innocent Steampunk would receive!

That's a good point.  I was prepping an article on Steampunk (and general) costume etiquette right before Harvey and Charlottesville, and tweaked it when I thought of some of the ramifications of certain costumes and saw at least one con outright banning Nazi/original Hydra costumes.



Well, the thing to remember is the the whole thing has been politicised to an extreme, thus ruining anybody's free expression. The problem is that the absolutely most radical elements of society are now trying to inject themselves into the daily narrative, "crashing parties" so to speak, pollitical, historical, or otherwise, in the hope of gathering supporters for their radical movements. The risk being that a-political people, whether they be historical re-enactors or Steampunks would be sidelined within any gathering, and the only thing the public would see is the message of the radicals. Literally when you see them coming with their Tiki torches and Polo shirts Roll Eyes you'd immediately have to shut down the party and dismiss all the guests....
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