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Author Topic: Perfect Steampunk Car!  (Read 706 times)
heatlifer
Swab

United States United States


« on: June 09, 2017, 02:58:32 am »

https://youtu.be/_tCuY_3OxgQ
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RJBowman
Zeppelin Captain
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« Reply #1 on: June 09, 2017, 03:15:30 am »

Too much "paint it gold and glue some gears on it". I've seen much better.
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heatlifer
Swab

United States United States


« Reply #2 on: June 09, 2017, 03:22:18 am »

Any examples you care to share? Im a big custom car fan especially steampunk cars.

These are another one I found:
https://youtu.be/VfJ3rB7xptY

And a bike:
https://youtu.be/Oj4HT9zUoBg
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annevpreussen
Gunner
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United States United States


Captain Annemarie of the Eagle's Arrow Airship


« Reply #3 on: June 09, 2017, 05:56:09 pm »

I think that first car has a pretty design, but it's not extreme or extravagant enough to be super steampunk for me. But that second one!!! Oh my goodness, how does someone even make something like that? It's gorgeous AND it actually works!!!
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I wear goggles so you can't see when I'm staring at you.
Miranda.T
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #4 on: June 09, 2017, 06:25:40 pm »

Any examples you care to share? Im a big custom car fan especially steampunk cars.

These are another one I found:
https://youtu.be/VfJ3rB7xptY

And a bike:
https://youtu.be/Oj4HT9zUoBg

Thank you for posting those up - definitely worth a view.

I think that first car has a pretty design, but it's not extreme or extravagant enough to be super steampunk for me. But that second one!!! Oh my goodness, how does someone even make something like that? It's gorgeous AND it actually works!!!

The one in the second post is rather special, isn't it? It looks like one its those switches should flip wings from its sides and propeller from its front to allow it to soar into the air.

Yours,
Miranda.
« Last Edit: June 09, 2017, 06:27:42 pm by Miranda.T » Logged
RJBowman
Zeppelin Captain
*****


« Reply #5 on: June 09, 2017, 06:41:48 pm »

Any examples you care to share? Im a big custom car fan especially steampunk cars.

These are another one I found:
https://youtu.be/VfJ3rB7xptY

And a bike:
https://youtu.be/Oj4HT9zUoBg

Your example is good enough that I don't need to provide one.
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James Harrison
Immortal
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England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #6 on: June 10, 2017, 12:43:59 pm »

If I were looking to build or own a steampunk car, I wouldn't be starting with a Mini Clubman.  It just doesn't have the panache or style about it.

That said, I rather like what was done with the interior, which looked smooth, stylish and sophisticated. 
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Persons intending to travel by open carriage should select a seat with their backs to the engine, by which means they will avoid the ashes emitted therefrom, that in travelling generally, but particularly through the tunnels, prove a great annoyance; the carriage farthest from the engine will in consequence be found the most desirable.
Cmdr. Storm
Officer
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United States United States


« Reply #7 on: July 04, 2017, 01:46:02 am »

There's a Show on Discovery Channel Called "Vegas Rat Rods" and the Guy Who Owns and Runs the Shop Built a Really Steampunk looking Car that was Train Inspired & a Dually! the Shop name is welderup! i thin they may Have the Car posted on Youtube, so Go and Check it out!
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RJBowman
Zeppelin Captain
*****


« Reply #8 on: July 04, 2017, 07:18:24 pm »

The old kit cars, most popular in the 1970's and typically built on Volkswagen beetle frames, might be a better bet for building your perfect steampunk car.

Example:

The George Barris T-Buggy, available in delivery truck or more typical dune buggy configurations. The kit was built on a volkswagen or custom frame, with choice of volkswagen or chevrolet corvair engine. in the 70's, some businesses had the truck variant custom painted as advertising vehicles. Barris attempted to build a dealers' network for the custom cars, but there just wasn't enough demand to support it.
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markf
Goggleologist
*****
United States United States



WWW
« Reply #9 on: October 27, 2017, 02:31:00 pm »

My old Smart car/steam punk conversion, both outside and inside the vehicle. From 7 years ago on BG. It was, and still is, my most extensive steampunk project to date. markf

http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,27501.0.html

« Last Edit: October 27, 2017, 02:34:08 pm by markf » Logged

US ARMY-WORKING HARDER, NOT SMARTER. Steampunk Smart Car & Office Cubicle, Levitating Mossarium, Dive Pocket Watch; 1915 Wilson Goggles/Swing-Arm Monocular; Boiling Tube Lamp; Pocket Watch/Cell Phone; Air Kraken Augmentotron. http://sites.google.com/site/steampunkretrofuturedesignsmd
Mr.Fancypants
Deck Hand
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United States United States



« Reply #10 on: October 28, 2017, 03:35:33 pm »

Has anyone seen a steampunk car mod on a VW Thing yet?
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J. Wilhelm
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Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #11 on: October 28, 2017, 05:13:05 pm »

Has anyone seen a steampunk car mod on a VW Thing yet?

The thing with the "Thing" (aka Volkswagen Type 181 and known as "Safari" in México), is that those vehicles tend to be very old and rare in my experience, at least in the United States. They could be found more commonly in Mexican beachside resort towns, partly because of how they looked (I mean, they do look like a safari vehicle). I did see a few brand new ones in Mexico City back when I was in Junior high and they looked rather spiffy in shiny red paint with the big cylinder tail lights on, but VW stopped making them in Indonesia and Mexico in 1980; VW's last produced unit came from Hanover Germany in 1983. I think I saw one single specimen here in Austin about 15 years ago in my college years... The only other instance was in Indiana Jones movies  Grin. Only seen one so far, this side of the border, after living in the US for 30 years. But all those flat surfaces would be ideal to add stuff - though that makes it sound like "glueing a cog on it"

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volkswagen_181

JW
« Last Edit: October 28, 2017, 05:34:34 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged

Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #12 on: November 16, 2017, 04:53:24 am »

Has anyone seen a steampunk car mod on a VW Thing yet?

The thing with the "Thing" (aka Volkswagen Type 181 and known as "Safari" in México), is that those vehicles tend to be very old and rare in my experience, at least in the United States. They could be found more commonly in Mexican beachside resort towns, partly because of how they looked (I mean, they do look like a safari vehicle). I did see a few brand new ones in Mexico City back when I was in Junior high and they looked rather spiffy in shiny red paint with the big cylinder tail lights on, but VW stopped making them in Indonesia and Mexico in 1980; VW's last produced unit came from Hanover Germany in 1983. I think I saw one single specimen here in Austin about 15 years ago in my college years... The only other instance was in Indiana Jones movies  Grin. Only seen one so far, this side of the border, after living in the US for 30 years. But all those flat surfaces would be ideal to add stuff - though that makes it sound like "glueing a cog on it"

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volkswagen_181

JW


 that is a groooovy buggy

 [even if it reminds me a little of a roll back sardine tin]
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RJBowman
Zeppelin Captain
*****


« Reply #13 on: November 17, 2017, 05:33:15 am »

The "thing" vehicle has its origins in a WWII military vehicle; Hitler's "People's Car", which was about to go into production in the late 1930's, was instead pressed into service, with a redesigned paneled body. The style was revived in the 1970's to appeal to off-road enthusiasts, and was marketed in the United States with a TV advertising campaign. Like it's sister vehicle, the beetle, is ceased being imported the the U.S. in the late 1970's due to new emissions system requirements that made the vehicle inefficient and impractical.
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Fairley B. Strange
Zeppelin Overlord
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Australia Australia


Relax, I've done much dumber things and survived..


WWW
« Reply #14 on: November 17, 2017, 06:14:42 am »

Isn't the Safari just an update of the WW2 Kubelwagen?
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J. Wilhelm
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United States United States


Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #15 on: November 23, 2017, 12:29:57 am »

Isn't the Safari just an update of the WW2 Kubelwagen?

The design was obviously inspired from the Kubelwagen, but the Type 181 a/k/a Kurierwagen (Germany) a/k/a Thing (USA) a/k/a Trekker (UK) a/k/a Safari (Mexico) a/k/a Pescaccia (Italy) was actually fairly different than the Kubelwagen, though they shared parts. The former was released in 1968, and the latter in 1940. It seems that the Mexican market played a big part in the decision to make the Type 181 and continue production until 1980, long after other countries had dropped it.


Wiki:

Quote
During the 1960s, several European governments began cooperating on development of a vehicle known as the Europa Jeep, a lightweight, amphibious four-wheel drive vehicle that could be mass-produced for use by various national military and government groups. Development of the vehicle proved time-consuming, however, and the West German government was in need of a limited number of light, inexpensive, durable transport vehicles that could fulfill their basic needs while the Europa Jeep was being developed and put into production.

Although Volkswagen had been approached during the 1950s about building such a vehicle, and had subsequently passed on the proposition, the then-current management of the company saw the project as having some amount of potential as a consumer vehicle; Mexican customers were asking for something that could handle rural roads better than the Type 1, which was a large seller in Mexico at the time, and the popularity of VW-based dune buggies within the U.S. made executives think that a durable, fun, off-road-capable vehicle would become attractive to many buyers. VW could keep cost to a minimum and thus maximize profitability by using existing parts.

Like the World War II era Type 82 Kübelwagen, the Type 181 used mechanical parts and a rear-engine platform, manual transmission and a flat-4 engine derived from that of the Type 1.

The floorpans came from the Type 1 Karmann Ghia, which had a wider floorpan than the Beetle. Rear swing axle suspension with reduction gearing from the discontinued split-screen Volkswagen Transporter was used until 1973, when it was replaced with double-jointed axles used by Porsche and IRS semi-trailing arm setup as used on the 1303 and US-spec Beetles.

Civilian sales began in mainland Europe and Mexico during 1971; in the U.S. in 1972; and briefly in Britain in 1975, where it failed to sell well and was dropped fairly quickly.

The model was dropped from the American lineup for 1975 as it failed to meet new, stricter US safety standards. The Type 181 was reclassified as a passenger vehicle, and thus subject to stricter safety standards. The Windshield Intrusion Rule of the 1975 DOT standard called for a greater distance between the front seat occupants and the front window glass.[2]

The Europa Jeep was the result of a NATO plan to have a vehicle whereby each European NATO makers all combined to build a light-duty patrol vehicle.

The Volkswagen 181 was only supposed to fill in, until the time that the Europa Jeep was ready. From 1968 until 1979, over 50,000 Type 181s were delivered to the NATO forces. By 1979 the Europa Jeep project had fallen apart completely and was abandoned, and the West German government began supplementing their consumption of 181s with the new front-engined Type 183 Iltis.

Despite the West German government's switch to the Type 183, European and Mexican sales of the civilian 181 continued through 1980, and several organizations, including NATO, continued to purchase military-spec Type 181 units through 1983, finding their reliability and low purchase and maintenance costs attractive.





1976 Type 181 in Canada auto show (Image, Creative Common License by "2.0")
« Last Edit: November 23, 2017, 12:53:12 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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