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Author Topic: Blade Runner 2049  (Read 802 times)
J. Wilhelm
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« on: May 10, 2017, 07:23:03 am »

Oh boy. Here we go. Emasculating Ghost in the Shell was not enough for them, now they're going for Blade Runner...

BLADE RUNNER 2049 - Official Trailer
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« Reply #1 on: May 10, 2017, 12:42:23 pm »

Blade Runner is one of my all time, favourite movies (and books).

I like the look of the trailer.

Looking forward to it.
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« Reply #2 on: May 13, 2017, 07:54:24 pm »

I'm looking forward to this. I've read the sequel novels that came out years ago and really didn't like them in the least, so as long as this is better than those I shall be happy.  Smiley
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« Reply #3 on: May 13, 2017, 09:05:29 pm »

I'm looking forward to it too ...
and the special edition ...
and the directors cut ...
and the special directors cut ...
and the remastered anniversary edition ...
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« Reply #4 on: May 13, 2017, 09:26:07 pm »

I haven't been to the cinema since Star Trek: Generations. This film may change that.
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« Reply #5 on: May 14, 2017, 08:02:41 am »

Oh boy. Here we go. Emasculating Ghost in the Shell was not enough for them, now they're going for Blade Runner...

Yeah.
I feel the same way.
I can only hope to be mildly surprised.

yhs
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« Reply #6 on: May 14, 2017, 09:50:30 am »

I'm looking forward to it too ...
and the special edition ...
and the directors cut ...
and the special directors cut ...
and the remastered anniversary edition ...

Yep. That's the reason we had to retire George Lucas from the Star Wars franchise. He wouldn't stop messing with the movies!

Oh boy. Here we go. Emasculating Ghost in the Shell was not enough for them, now they're going for Blade Runner...

Yeah.
I feel the same way.
I can only hope to be mildly surprised.

yhs
prof mvl

I just don't want some director to mess with the story "over the summer" giving us a way-overpriced exterior with shiny sparkling and a half-baked pasty interior. The original Blade Runner was made with a shoe string budget and it worked rather nicely.
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« Reply #7 on: May 15, 2017, 04:42:01 am »

Uh-oh! In the trailer there a spot where one person keeps telling the principal character "I've told you... you're special" ....  Roll Eyes Call me superstitious, but in Ghost in the Shell people told "The Major" Kusanagi that she "was special," like every five minutes for the duration of the movie...  Roll Eyes In the original GitS Kusanagi was niot special. Just one of millions like her who found gerself in extraordinary circumstances.

What is it with sci-fi nowadays where the main character has to "be special"  Roll Eyes Back in the old days of cyberpunk no one was special. That was the whole point. They were he stories of people living in a dark dystopian future. Have writers forgotten what a cyberpunk story is?
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« Reply #8 on: May 15, 2017, 07:37:28 pm »

Uh-oh! In the trailer there a spot where one person keeps telling the principal character "I've told you... you're special" ....  Roll Eyes Call me superstitious, but in Ghost in the Shell people told "The Major" Kusanagi that she "was special," like every five minutes for the duration of the movie...  Roll Eyes In the original GitS Kusanagi was niot special. Just one of millions like her who found gerself in extraordinary circumstances.

What is it with sci-fi nowadays where the main character has to "be special"  Roll Eyes Back in the old days of cyberpunk no one was special. That was the whole point. They were he stories of people living in a dark dystopian future. Have writers forgotten what a cyberpunk story is?



It's what happens when a later generation "takes over," so to speak. Allegedly new ideas, and different (sometimes/often obtusely so) angles on the old ideas. It's pretty much inevitable.
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« Reply #9 on: May 15, 2017, 11:05:20 pm »

Uh-oh! In the trailer there a spot where one person keeps telling the principal character "I've told you... you're special" ....  Roll Eyes Call me superstitious, but in Ghost in the Shell people told "The Major" Kusanagi that she "was special," like every five minutes for the duration of the movie...  Roll Eyes In the original GitS Kusanagi was niot special. Just one of millions like her who found gerself in extraordinary circumstances.

What is it with sci-fi nowadays where the main character has to "be special"  Roll Eyes Back in the old days of cyberpunk no one was special. That was the whole point. They were he stories of people living in a dark dystopian future. Have writers forgotten what a cyberpunk story is?

I believe it has to do with the current "New Think" : for the past 20 years educators and etc seem to have had to tell every dumb kid "they are special" in order to somehow validate their drab existance.

"Everybody" has to have the possibility of being the hero. For years they habded out "participation trophies" just for showing up.
I have noticed a plethora of new Android Device games based on " you can be a gardener! you can be a fastfood clerk!" - not the Space Hero.
Part of the Great Dumbing Down.   ( see Cyril M. Kornbluth's very dark short story "Marching Morons" )

I guess that's how they sell the koolade now. :-(

yhs
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« Reply #10 on: May 16, 2017, 10:03:26 pm »


I believe it has to do with the current "New Think" : for the past 20 years educators and etc seem to have had to tell every dumb kid "they are special" in order to somehow validate their drab existance.

"Everybody" has to have the possibility of being the hero. For years they habded out "participation trophies" just for showing up.
I have noticed a plethora of new Android Device games based on " you can be a gardener! you can be a fastfood clerk!" - not the Space Hero.
Part of the Great Dumbing Down.   ( see Cyril M. Kornbluth's very dark short story "Marching Morons" )

I guess that's how they sell the koolade now. :-(

yhs
prof mvl

If I'm naturally special does it mean I don't actually have to make any effort to achieve things?  What a brilliant excuse!!
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MWBailey
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« Reply #11 on: May 20, 2017, 06:17:33 am »

Uh-oh! In the trailer there a spot where one person keeps telling the principal character "I've told you... you're special" ....  Roll Eyes Call me superstitious, but in Ghost in the Shell people told "The Major" Kusanagi that she "was special," like every five minutes for the duration of the movie...  Roll Eyes In the original GitS Kusanagi was niot special. Just one of millions like her who found gerself in extraordinary circumstances.

What is it with sci-fi nowadays where the main character has to "be special"  Roll Eyes Back in the old days of cyberpunk no one was special. That was the whole point. They were he stories of people living in a dark dystopian future. Have writers forgotten what a cyberpunk story is?

I believe it has to do with the current "New Think" : for the past 20 years educators and etc seem to have had to tell every dumb kid "they are special" in order to somehow validate their drab existance.

"Everybody" has to have the possibility of being the hero. For years they habded out "participation trophies" just for showing up.
I have noticed a plethora of new Android Device games based on " you can be a gardener! you can be a fastfood clerk!" - not the Space Hero.
Part of the Great Dumbing Down.   ( see Cyril M. Kornbluth's very dark short story "Marching Morons" )

I guess that's how they sell the koolade now. :-(

yhs
prof mvl




There was a cyberpunk novel or short story (wish I could recall the title) out several years ago, that dealt with the possibility of a culture that evolved from a society that enjoyed sharing creativity and free expression over the airwaves, into one in which people spent their lives jacked into their internet telephony devices, addicted to music produced by the media conglomerates precisely for the purpose of getting the population addicted to the music so that they could charge high prices for downloaded Schlocky Garbage which was so formulaic it was pitiful...

Wait a second...
« Last Edit: May 20, 2017, 06:20:22 am by MWBailey » Logged
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« Reply #12 on: May 20, 2017, 03:19:12 pm »

I saw Blade Runner for the first time last year. I didn't care for it. That probably makes me some sort of heretic.
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SeVeNeVeS
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« Reply #13 on: May 20, 2017, 03:36:38 pm »

I saw Blade Runner for the first time last year. I didn't care for it. That probably makes me some sort of heretic.


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Actually that's OK, I saw Ghost In the shell recently and couldn't see what all the fuss was about, average story.

Don't even get me started on the Star Wars thing, been wondering about that since 1977  Undecided
« Last Edit: May 20, 2017, 03:52:09 pm by SeVeNeVeS » Logged

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« Reply #14 on: May 20, 2017, 05:09:47 pm »

I've never seen Blade Runner! Or Ghost in the Shell, or .....!
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #15 on: May 20, 2017, 05:15:11 pm »

I think it's a generational issue.

There are two ways to look at those who didn't like Blade Runner and/or GitS:

1 you're young enough that anything before the Matrix looks bland and old fashioned. Like if I was raving about a 1950s/60s movie featuring "Robie the Robot" and you watching it. You're bound to think it's lame.

2 you already were a mature person when the movie came out and were not interested in the "young ones' newfangled science fiction" for example, if in 1977 you thought Star Wars was "silly" after watching it in the theater (my grandparents are a good example - they called the movie "weird" and when the saw the film location in the credits, commented "oh, no wonder, it's one of those weird British movies"  Grin

I'm neither surprised nor offended. I've met kids (early 20s/ late teens) who saw Star Wars episodes 1-3 in the theater AND episodes 4-6 on blu-ray and thought the whole franchise was "lame."

I've met kids (young adults), who had never seen the Matrix, and some who thought Lord of the Rings was more interesting. And I met another one (male) who though Harry Potter was far better .

I wonder how many of you would appreciate / denigrate Stanley Kubrick's "2001 A Space Odyssey" (1970?) or Andrei Tarkovsky's version of Stanislaw Lem's "Solaris" (The Russian movie from 1972 - not the one with George Clooney)?

I'm sure a lot of you would think both movies are lame. Though fans will probably clobber you for deriding them.

What blows my mind is that this is an anachronist's forum. One would think that people here would tolerate and even admire yesteryear's sci fi. I guess we're not interested unless our sci fi looks at least 100 years old...
« Last Edit: May 21, 2017, 05:29:39 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #16 on: May 21, 2017, 03:09:35 am »

I think it's because I'm not that mad keen on films! Of any sort, really. I'd rather read a book. Or do something else. Although I do have LOTR on DVD (gift from a friend), and a tendency to fast forward through some of it! I didn't mind "2001 A Space Odyssey", although I saw it years after it was released, and have only seen bits & pieces of "Solaris". But then, I'm more of a space opera fan than a scifi one (for films), even though there are some excellent scifi films out there.
« Last Edit: May 21, 2017, 03:14:24 am by Banfili » Logged
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« Reply #17 on: May 21, 2017, 08:44:41 am »

I've never seen Blade Runner! Or Ghost in the Shell, or .....!
Blade runner is an excellent movie, watch it if you can. I'm slightly worried about the sequel tho, alot to live up too and am hoping it won't go down the cash in because we can route.

I just thought Lucy was a much better movie than GITS, only my opinion tho.
« Last Edit: May 21, 2017, 08:52:35 am by SeVeNeVeS » Logged
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #18 on: May 21, 2017, 09:09:11 am »

I think it's because I'm not that mad keen on films! Of any sort, really. I'd rather read a book. Or do something else. Although I do have LOTR on DVD (gift from a friend), and a tendency to fast forward through some of it! I didn't mind "2001 A Space Odyssey", although I saw it years after it was released, and have only seen bits & pieces of "Solaris". But then, I'm more of a space opera fan than a scifi one (for films), even though there are some excellent scifi films out there.

I've never seen Blade Runner! Or Ghost in the Shell, or .....!
Blade runner is an excellent movie, watch it if you can. I'm slightly worried about the sequel tho, alot to live up too and am hoping it won't go down the cash in because we can route.

I just thought Lucy was a much better movie than GITS, only my opinion tho.

When in doubt, always, always watch/read the original first. It is very rare that a sequel or remake will be better than the original. I'd say almost impossible.

Watch Tarkovsky's Solaris (1972) - not the one with George Clooney (2002). Watch 2001 A Space Odyssey (1968), not 2010 Space Odyssey (1984), go see Mamoru Oshii's adaptation of Ghost in the Shell from 1995, not Rupert Sanders' mangled GitS from 2017. Watch Blade Runner from 1982 (though I'll admit the Director's cut from 1992 is better just because they removed an annoying narration by Harrison Ford)... and so on...

And honestly, if you want the best seat in the house - just read. If you want to see the movie but you like to read, best advice: just read it before going to the theatre. Then you really know how the movie stacks up to the real thing.  By far, the best Solaris is Stanislaw Lem's 200 page novel Solaris (1962), the best Ghost in the Shell is Masamune Shirow's 300 page Kōkaku Kidōtai/Ghost in the Shell pulp fiction (Manga anthology from 1990 $27 USD published by Kodansha or the previous publisher Dark Horse Comics).  Trust me. It's much better and your brain will thank you  Grin

The exception here is Blade Runner, because it's just not the same as the novel. It was loosely adapted by Hampton Fancher and David Peoples, from the original by Philip K Dick, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?  And the fiction sequels of Blade Runner are written by KW Jeter (the "father" of the word "Steampunk" whom I understand was some sort of protégée of Mr. Philip L Dick) - but be warned - the first sequel which I read was BAD. Sorry to Mr. Jeter, but I have to say it. KW Jeter tanks on that one, protégée or not.

A bit of good news, though: Blade Runner 2049's screenplay was co-written by Hampton Fancher so at least one guy knows how the original went....
« Last Edit: May 21, 2017, 09:55:13 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #19 on: May 21, 2017, 09:55:37 am »

I saw Blade Runner for the first time last year. I didn't care for it. That probably makes me some sort of heretic.



BR's always been that way; you either like it or you hate it.

A lot of people were into Vangelis' music back then (they did much/most of the movie's score), and went to see the movie because of that; they were rather disappointed in every other aspect of the movie, so I hear. I wasn't that much into that end of the new agey kind of music, but I was every bit as much of an odd, anachronistic bird then as I am now, so that aspect of it (Decaying Urban Art Deco, as i like to call it) did appeal to me, and I was rather taken with the Spinner "flying car" police vehicles and the architectural hodgepodge of the set design; I found out that a favorite SF artist of mine, John Berkey, did many or most of those designs, so I suppose that had somewhat to do with my liking for the flick.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #20 on: May 21, 2017, 10:38:54 am »

I saw Blade Runner for the first time last year. I didn't care for it. That probably makes me some sort of heretic.




BR's always been that way; you either like it or you hate it.

A lot of people were into Vangelis' music back then (they did much/most of the movie's score), and went to see the movie because of that; they were rather disappointed in every other aspect of the movie, so I hear. I wasn't that much into that end of the new agey kind of music, but I was every bit as much of an odd, anachronistic bird then as I am now, so that aspect of it (Decaying Urban Art Deco, as i like to call it) did appeal to me, and I was rather taken with the Spinner "flying car" police vehicles and the architectural hodgepodge of the set design; I found out that a favorite SF artist of mine, John Berkey, did many or most of those designs, so I suppose that had somewhat to do with my liking for the flick.


It did have a "film noir" aspect to it. A 1940's gum-shoe vibe to it. It was interesting to see Rachel (Sean Young) wearing a very 1940's skirt suit. And Gaff (Edward Kames Olmos) was very much a "Zoot Suit"  Grin Dieselpunk?

Here's an interesting wiki for Blade Runner:

http://bladerunner.wikia.com/wiki/Main_Page

I don't think the film became a cult phenomenon until a decade later with the release of the Director's Cut, though...

It mixed a lot of styles though. The chose Pris (Daryl Hannah) and Roy Batty (Rutger Hauer) to be very "Punk" looking.
« Last Edit: May 21, 2017, 10:42:30 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
R. K. Beetle
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« Reply #21 on: May 22, 2017, 09:53:46 pm »

I think it's a generational issue.

There are two ways to look at those who didn't like Blade Runner and/or GitS:

1 you're young enough that anything before the Matrix looks bland and old fashioned. Like if I was raving about a 1950s/60s movie featuring "Robie the Robot" and you watching it. You're bound to think it's lame.

2 you already were a mature person when the movie came out and were not interested in the "young ones' newfangled science fiction"

I was in 2nd grade when BR came out, so I'm a tad young, but not so much that it looks "old fashioned". I'm just not a fan of the bleak, dystopian sci-fi that was all the rage in the 80s. I watched Mad Max (the original), for the first time recently as well, and I was left feeling depressed—much like after I saw Blade Runner. (I did see and enjoy Thunderdome when it came out though.)
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Prof Marvel
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« Reply #22 on: May 23, 2017, 03:41:29 am »

I think that Science Fiction Films, even more than the written word, are products of (and constrained by) their times.

Not only the special effects -which after 30-50 years can almost certainly be considered as anything from "meh" to pathetic -
but the especially the "tone" and relevance which is literally a product of events of the moment.

An example might be "same-sex relations" which were shocking to some in the '60s but are mainstream today as gent's on "Wheel of Fortune" discuss their loving husband.

Often, a film's intent "back then" was to force thinking "outside the box" via "strange new concepts" or "shocking ideas".

Once those were broached some 20, 30 , 40 years ago the discussion  of the "previously unimagined" have already been ongoing...  and are now
commonplace.

Sometimes a re-make can update the product to once again become cutting edge , and begin new topics of discussion.
Sometimes a re-make only offers new SFX and bigger shinier ... stuff.

yhs
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« Reply #23 on: May 23, 2017, 12:31:38 pm »

Just found the 'other' sequel in a second-hand bookstore. It will be interesting reading, even if it never has a good reputation.

Blade Runner 2 - The edge of human by KW Jetter.

Sorontar
« Last Edit: May 23, 2017, 12:33:42 pm by Sorontar » Logged

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« Reply #24 on: May 23, 2017, 01:00:37 pm »

Just found the 'other' sequel in a second-hand bookstore. It will be interesting reading, even if it never has a good reputation.

Blade Runner 2 - The edge of human by KW Jetter.

Sorontar

He also wrote 'Blade Runner 3: Replicant Night' (1996), and 'Blade Runner 4: Eye and Talon' (2000).
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