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Author Topic: Historic fabrics under threat...  (Read 359 times)
Rockula
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« on: April 06, 2017, 01:02:08 pm »

....from moths.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-39504494
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SeVeNeVeS
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« Reply #1 on: April 06, 2017, 01:34:32 pm »

The little buggers have been munching on my taxidermy collection as of last year.

Noticed and squished one a few weeks ago so the pheromone traps are a hangin' again.  Sad
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Madasasteamfish
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09madasafish
« Reply #2 on: April 06, 2017, 06:41:56 pm »

The little buggers have been munching on my taxidermy collection as of last year.

Noticed and squished one a few weeks ago so the pheromone traps are a hangin' again.  Sad

Ooh, I'd advise make sure you know the species if you're using pheromones (the main drawback to using pheromone based treatments is that a lot of insect pest species look alike).

Lavender might be a good option since a product I know is recommended by our National Pest advisor is a lavender scented moth deterrent. The other way is too keep things cool since they can't mate below 15oC.
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I made a note in my diary on the way over here. Simply says; "Bugger!"

"DON'T THINK OF IT AS DYING, JUST THINK OF IT AS LEAVING EARLY TO AVOID THE RUSH."
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« Reply #3 on: April 06, 2017, 06:52:29 pm »


The other way is too keep things cool since they can't mate below 15oC.

You know, it can't be much fun being a moth - avoiding flames in case you're drawn to them, having to put up with that horrible lavender smell that all the best fabric seems to have these days, spending so much time in a cocoon etc - and now you're suggesting taking away one of the few things they might look forward too .....
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« Reply #4 on: April 06, 2017, 07:13:37 pm »

The little buggers have been munching on my taxidermy collection as of last year.

Noticed and squished one a few weeks ago so the pheromone traps are a hangin' again.  Sad

Ooh, I'd advise make sure you know the species if you're using pheromones (the main drawback to using pheromone based treatments is that a lot of insect pest species look alike).

Lavender might be a good option since a product I know is recommended by our National Pest advisor is a lavender scented moth deterrent. The other way is too keep things cool since they can't mate below 15oC.
I've studied caught ones under a microscope and Tineola bisselliella, webbing clothes moth.

The traps worked well last year, but may try the Lavender as well.


The other way is too keep things cool since they can't mate below 15oC.

You know, it can't be much fun being a moth - avoiding flames in case you're drawn to them, having to put up with that horrible lavender smell that all the best fabric seems to have these days, spending so much time in a cocoon etc - and now you're suggesting taking away one of the few things they might look forward too .....
Good, DIE little fickers, DIE, DIE! Thousands of pounds worth of national treasures suffering here, so, deter, squish or destroy.
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Madasasteamfish
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09madasafish
« Reply #5 on: April 06, 2017, 08:49:35 pm »

The little buggers have been munching on my taxidermy collection as of last year.

Noticed and squished one a few weeks ago so the pheromone traps are a hangin' again.  Sad

Ooh, I'd advise make sure you know the species if you're using pheromones (the main drawback to using pheromone based treatments is that a lot of insect pest species look alike).

Lavender might be a good option since a product I know is recommended by our National Pest advisor is a lavender scented moth deterrent. The other way is too keep things cool since they can't mate below 15oC.
I've studied caught ones under a microscope and Tineola bisselliella, webbing clothes moth.

The traps worked well last year, but may try the Lavender as well.


The other way is too keep things cool since they can't mate below 15oC.

You know, it can't be much fun being a moth - avoiding flames in case you're drawn to them, having to put up with that horrible lavender smell that all the best fabric seems to have these days, spending so much time in a cocoon etc - and now you're suggesting taking away one of the few things they might look forward too .....
Good, DIE little fickers, DIE, DIE! Thousands of pounds worth of national treasures suffering here, so, deter, squish or destroy.

Working for a well known conservation charity I concur. Historic fabrics (are as a general rule) incredibly friable and some of the most pain in the ar*e things we have to deal with, there's almost nothing that doesn't seriously damage them and now we've got to deal with more moths.
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Peter Brassbeard
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« Reply #6 on: April 07, 2017, 01:55:58 am »

There used to be these things called "moth balls" that were effective in driving away moths and other insect pests.  But apparently they're too toxic for modern standards.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #7 on: April 07, 2017, 06:07:02 am »

There used to be these things called "moth balls" that were effective in driving away moths and other insect pests.  But apparently they're too toxic for modern standards.

Naphtalene?


Wiki:
Quote

As a fumingant:

Naphthalene has been used as a household fumigant. It was once the primary ingredient in mothballs, although its use has largely been replaced in favor of alternatives such as 1,4-dichlorobenzene. In a sealed container containing naphthalene pellets, naphthalene vapors build up to levels toxic to both the adult and larval forms of many moths that attack textiles. Other fumigant uses of naphthalene include use in soil as a fumigant pesticide, in attic spaces to repel animals and insects, and in museum storage-drawers and cupboards to protect the contents from attack by insect pests.
Naphthalene is a repellent to opossums.


Health effects
Exposure to large amounts of naphthalene may damage or destroy red blood cells, most commonly in people with an underlying G6PD (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase) deficiency.[31] Over 400 million people have an inherited condition called glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency. Humans, in particular children, have developed this condition, known as hemolytic anemia, after ingesting mothballs or deodorant blocks containing naphthalene. Symptoms include fatigue, lack of appetite, restlessness, and pale skin. Exposure to large amounts of naphthalene may cause confusion, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, blood in the urine, and jaundice (yellow coloration of the skin due to dysfunction of the liver).[32]
When the US National Toxicology Program (NTP) exposed male and female rats and mice to naphthalene vapors on weekdays for two years,[33] male and female rats exhibited evidence of carcinogenesis with increased incidences of adenoma and neuroblastoma of the nose, female mice exhibited some evidence of carcinogenesis based on increased incidences of alveolar and bronchiolar adenomas of the lung, and male mice exhibited no evidence of carcinogenesis.
The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC)[34] classifies naphthalene as possibly carcinogenic to humans and animals (Group 2B). The IARC also points out that acute exposure causes cataracts in humans, rats, rabbits, and mice; and that hemolytic anemia (described above) can occur in children and infants after oral or inhalation exposure or after maternal exposure during pregnancy. Under California's Proposition 65, naphthalene is listed as "known to the State to cause cancer".[35] A probable mechanism for the carcinogenic effects of mothballs and some types of air fresheners containing naphthalene has been identified.[36][37]
Regulation
US government agencies have set occupational exposure limits to naphthalene exposure. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration has set a permissible exposure limit at 10 ppm (50 mg/m3) over an eight-hour time-weighted average. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health has set a recommended exposure limit at 10 ppm (50 mg/m3) over an eight-hour time-weighted average, as well as a short-term exposure limit at 15 ppm (75 mg/m3).[38]
Mothballs and other products containing naphthalene have been banned within the EU since 2008.[39][40]
In China, the use of naphthalene in mothballs is forbidden.[41] Danger to human health and the common use of natural camphor are cited as reasons for the ban.
 


The modern version of mothballs uses Camphor instead:

Quote
Pest deterrent and preservative
Camphor is believed to be toxic to insects and is thus sometimes used as a repellent.[13] Camphor is used to make mothballs. Camphor crystals are sometimes used to prevent damage to insect collections by other small insects. It is kept in clothes used on special occasions and festivals, and also in cupboard corners as a cockroach repellent.
Camphor is also used as an antimicrobial substance. In embalming, camphor oil was one of the ingredients used by ancient Egyptians for mummification.[14]
Solid camphor releases fumes that form a rust-preventative coating and is therefore stored in tool chests to protect tools against rust.

Medicinal
Camphor is readily absorbed through the skin, producing either a coolness or warmth sensation,[20][21] and acts as slight local anesthetic and antimicrobial substance.
Camphor is an active ingredient (along with menthol) in vapor-steam products, such as Vicks VapoRub. It is used as a cough suppressant[22] and as a decongestant.[22]
Camphor may also be administered orally in small quantities (50 mg) for minor heart symptoms and fatigue.[23] Through much of the 1900s this was sold under the trade name Musterole; production ceased in the 1990s.
Camphor was used in ancient Sumatra to treat sprains, swellings, and inflammation.[24] Camphor is a component of paregoric, an opium/camphor tincture from the 18th century. Also in the 18th century, camphor was used by Auenbrugger in the treatment of mania.[25] Based on Hahnemann's writings, camphor (dissolved in alcohol) was also successfully used to treat the 1854-1855 cholera epidemics in Naples.[26]
It has long been used as a medical substance in ancient India, where it generally goes by the name Karpūra. It has been described in the 7th-century Āyurvedic work Mādhavacikitsā as being an effective drug used for the treatment of fever. The plant has also been named Hima and has been identified with the plant Cinnamomum camphora. According to the Vaidyaka-śabda-sindhu, it is one of the “five flavours” used in betel-chewing, where it is also referred to as Candrabhasma (‘moon powder’).
Small dose
Its effects on the body include tachycardia (increased heart rate), vasodilation in skin (flushing), slower breathing, reduced appetite, increased secretions and excretions such as perspiration and urination. [27]
The sensation of heat or cold that camphor produces is caused by activating the ion channel TRPV3.[20][21]
Large dose toxicity
Camphor is poisonous in large doses. It produces symptoms of irritability, disorientation, lethargy, muscle spasms, vomiting, abdominal cramps, convulsions, and seizures.[28][29][30] Lethal doses in adults are in the range 50–500 mg/kg (orally). Generally, two grams cause serious toxicity and four grams are potentially lethal.[31]
Regulation
In 1980, the US Food and Drug Administration set a limit of 11% allowable camphor in consumer products, and banned products labeled as camphorated oil, camphor oil, camphor liniment, and camphorated liniment (except "white camphor essential oil", which contains no significant amount of camphor[citation needed]). Since alternative treatments exist, medicinal use of camphor is discouraged by the FDA, except for skin-related uses, such as medicated powders, which contain only small amounts of camphor.

« Last Edit: April 07, 2017, 06:13:39 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged

J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #8 on: April 07, 2017, 06:18:51 am »

A home-made insect repellent: http://creative.sulekha.com/use-of-camphor-mosquito-repellant_561320_blog


http://creative.sulekha.com/use-of-camphor-mosquito-repellant_561320_blog
Quote
In the past, man would light diyas and burn camphor on a regular basis as a part of daily puja. These helped to purify the air and keep harmful bacteria, viruses and mosquitoes away! We can definitely have a better and healthy environment with the use of camphor.
Camphor or Kapur is a waxy, white or transparent substance extracted from the wood of the Camphor Laurel tree found in Asia . Camphor has many known medicinal uses-
It relieves nasal congestion and cough when rubbed on the chest as an oil. Camphor is used as an ingredient in throat lozenges and cough syrups and in Vicks. Camphor is also used in some anti-itch ointments, creams and cooling gels because it is can be absorbed through skin and is effective at treating pain locally. It has an analgesic effect which makes it a favorite oil to be used in pain relieving massage blends for sore muscles and arthritic pain. Camphor is known to improve the quality of air making it a better for our lungs and heart.
Many people are not aware of the Mosquito repellent power of Camphor - a simple solution without side effects and very cost effective. CAMPHOR IS A NATURAL MOSQUITO REPELLENT With effect round the clock! You do not need to burn it for that. There are three easier ways to do it -
1. Put 2 tablets of commercially available camphor on any warm surface- the device shown in the picture serves the purpose well. Plug it for an hour and see the results! You can do it twice a day- morning and in the night as well!
2. Place 2 tablets of camphor on different corners of the room or at places where mosquitoes seem to love to stay! Leave them there and they will evaporate in a day or so keeping the air purer and mosquito free.
3. Take a wide opened cup or plate with water. Drop 2 tablets of Camphor into the water. Keep the cup with water and camphor in your sleeping room. The quantity of water and camphor may differ from room size. Water evaporate at normal temperature. Camphor slowly started dissolving in water. The water evaporates with Camphor smell. Adding little bit hot water gives instant action.
You will be amazed at the results! Do experience it and help spread these healthy tips!
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Madasasteamfish
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09madasafish
« Reply #9 on: April 07, 2017, 10:05:22 am »

There used to be these things called "moth balls" that were effective in driving away moths and other insect pests.  But apparently they're too toxic for modern standards.

Naphtalene?

It's not quite been totally replaced (although regulations around its' use are much stricter) since I'm almost certain the main pesticide we use at work has Napthalene as the active ingredient (however we try and avoid using it except as a last resort). The problem is really the fumes if they're allowed to build up, or if it's used in an enclosed space (such as a drawer, or wardrobe).
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