The Steampunk Forum at Brass Goggles
December 17, 2017, 03:16:39 am *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Support BrassGoggles! Donate once or $3/mo.
 See details here.
 
   Home   Blog Help Rules Login Register  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Steampunk/game  (Read 580 times)
Dhraevin
Deck Hand
*
United States United States



« on: February 18, 2017, 04:32:09 pm »

Hi all,

My name is Jerry and I love the look and creativity of the SteamPunk genre. I am currently in school (at 34) for Computer Information Systems with a focus on game development. So I would like for people to tell me what really makes SteamPunk, SteamPunk. I want to create a series of game that will develop into a SteamPunk MMO like WoW.

Thank you,
Jerry Franklin
Logged
Wolfgang Edwards
Deck Hand
*
United States United States


WWW
« Reply #1 on: February 19, 2017, 12:24:35 am »

Ultimately I think what distinguishes Steampunk are the aesthetics. The look and feel of Victorian-era technology, fashion, decor, architecture, etc, is probably the key element, although the romantic in me would insist that there's more to it - like ideas and themes to be specific.

Imperialism versus independence, civil liberties overcoming oppressive laws and backwards traditions, creativity and inventiveness improving and exploring beyond what people think is possible. Those are a few Steampunk ideals you can expect to find in most Steampunk stories, be they literary, film, video games or otherwise.

Hope that helps Smiley
Logged

If you like Science Fiction, Fantasy, Horror or Steampunk, check out 'The University of Corporeal & Ethereal Studies'
https://store.bookbaby.com/book/The-University-of-Corporeal-and-Ethereal-Studies
morozow
Zeppelin Captain
*****
Russian Federation Russian Federation



WWW
« Reply #2 on: February 19, 2017, 01:29:34 pm »

And don't forget the dark side of this.

Turn people into appendages of machines.
The development of the means of killing and destruction.
Cities that are not only important centers of culture, but also the focus of dirt and defects.
Logged

Sorry for the errors, rudeness and stupidity. It's not me, this online translator. Really convenient?
Argus Fairbrass
Rogue Ætherlord
*
England England


So English even the English don't get it!


« Reply #3 on: February 19, 2017, 05:42:25 pm »

For ideas on game design, there's actually a fairly large body of work for reference at this point. If you want to tick all the boxes, ie create something in line with what the majority of folks perceptions of SP currently seem to be, you're looking at setting it some time in the C19th. Although it can be set anywhere in the world, that world should have visible elements of some manner of industrial revolution about it (purely because it's what folks expect). For SP design that really made an effort to be believable, and very in keeping with the time period, I can't recommend The Order 1886 enough (such a shame it wasn't a film). But remember, I'm referring to elements people seem to associate with the concept nowadays, rather than anything that has to be there. The details are of course up to you. Magic & fantasy were also big elements in the original SP books. and often actually featured more heavily than technology (until The Difference Engine was published).
« Last Edit: February 19, 2017, 05:46:45 pm by Argus Fairbrass » Logged

Have her steamed and brought to my tent!
RJBowman
Zeppelin Captain
*****


« Reply #4 on: February 21, 2017, 02:51:23 am »

Exotic vehicles are popular; airships, submarines, even ironclad land vehicles that roll on wheels or walk on legs.

And exotic weapons, too. Rayguns are popular accessories at steampunk conventions, but steampunk weapons can also include airguns, electromagnetic coil or rail guns, and even non-gun weapons like swords, daggers, katars, etc. Science-fiction weapons are crafted to look like they came from the era of steam and early electricity, with brass and copper, coils, etc. Vacuum tubes, though they are not really from the era, are popular components of prop guns, because they are an element of old technology that is mostly no longer in use in our era.

Clothing is usually inspired by 19th and early 20th century fashion. Military, safari, early aviation, and scientific themed costumes are popular at the steampunk shows. I have seen people in armor, but not like medieval armor; one guy had a mask that could have come from a Gwar concert.

Steampunk does not have to just be about western countries; Asia, Africa, Pacific Island nations, etc., could be inspirations for steampunk. Imagine samurai battling with steam powered mecha.

I, myself, have always thought that early silent science fiction films should have more influence on steampunk. Do a google video search for Fritz Lang's "Metropolis" and Georges Méliès' "A Trip to the Moon"; these movies have devotees among the steampunks, and they are packed with images and designs that could be inspirational. Some research will turn up lesser known silent science fiction films that could provide ideas. Some silent horror films and action serials might also fit the category. There is a film called "Things to Come", which is a sound film, and maybe a little out of period being a product of the 1930's, but the film was made by H.G. Welles himself, and is full of cool design and science fiction goofiness, and you should definitely see it.
Logged
Wolfgang Edwards
Deck Hand
*
United States United States


WWW
« Reply #5 on: February 21, 2017, 05:37:45 am »

Indeed the original Steampunk storytellers (who also happen to be the founding fathers of Science Fiction overall) Jules Verne and H.G. Wells are probably the best references for what is at the heart of Steampunk.

These guys actually lived in the late 1800s and were imagining fantastic inventions and leaps in science that blended the real technology and ideas of their time to create the original sci-fi stories.

I wonder if Steampunk is such an especially vibrant sub-genre of sci-fi because it is essentially built around the time and place where the original sci-fi authors began writing? I never thought of Steampunk that way.
Logged
Dhraevin
Deck Hand
*
United States United States



« Reply #6 on: February 21, 2017, 05:58:32 am »

Some very wonderful insists. This is the kind of stuff I was looking to get. Please give me more literature, sites and any references. I want to incorporate all aspects of SteamPunk. I want everyone to feel that there is nothing missing for this sub-genre in my games. Now it is likely to be a few years before I make the first one, but I will definitely keep people updated.
Logged
RJBowman
Zeppelin Captain
*****


« Reply #7 on: February 21, 2017, 06:11:13 am »

If you had millions to develop the game, you could make a game where you could customize your character to be unique, move through a game world shared with other players, pursue villains (or run from the law), acquire weapons and equipment, find hidden lairs, vehicles, artifacts, etc. It might be better to start with an already developed game engine. Maybe start small, with flat sprite characters in an isometric tile game engine, then if you can prove the popularity of the game, hook up with a large established game company that could develop the fully featured 3-D dream game.

But enough talk of game features and development; back the what typifies steampunk.
Logged
Argus Fairbrass
Rogue Ætherlord
*
England England


So English even the English don't get it!


« Reply #8 on: February 22, 2017, 12:47:31 pm »

Indeed the original Steampunk storytellers (who also happen to be the founding fathers of Science Fiction overall) Jules Verne and H.G. Wells are probably the best references for what is at the heart of Steampunk.
I think it bares repeating that the original Steampunk authors were Tim Powers, James Blaylock & the man who invented the name K.W.Jeter. Although Jeter's own book Morlock Night, was indeed a kind of spiritual sequel to Wells' The Time Machine, it actually revolved around a very different premise, being the first of an intended series of books inspired by the Arthurian legends. The other books to which he was referring when he coined the term Steampunk  (Homunculus by Blaylock & The Anubis Gates by Powers) were also magic and fantasy heavy works. different in tone to anything produced by the likes of Verne & Wells, who were rather writing fiction often inspired by the scientific knowledge of their time.
« Last Edit: February 22, 2017, 11:58:31 pm by Argus Fairbrass » Logged
Argus Fairbrass
Rogue Ætherlord
*
England England


So English even the English don't get it!


« Reply #9 on: February 22, 2017, 01:26:00 pm »

Sorry about the double post, I have a word count limit. Anyway, although inarguably an inspiration, neither Verne, Wells or any other C19th writers are Steampunk authors. They couldn't be for one simple reason, although dating back to the late '70s, Steampunk is a contemporary genre of literature. Just as Terry Pratchett wrote a type of fantasy that could really only be written now, (Tolkien was no doubt an inspiration, but how similar is Pratchett's work?) The contemporary part is a pretty important element of SP that the likes of Verne, Wells et al would probably find utterly baffling. Now, how much influence the original Steampunk authors are having on the current subculture? and whether you wish to reflect what Steampunk used to be originally, or what it largely seems to be percieved as now? is a different matter entirely. The Order 1886 managed both, and yet ironically the game designers didn't want it labelled as Steampunk.
« Last Edit: February 22, 2017, 08:49:08 pm by Argus Fairbrass » Logged
Dhraevin
Deck Hand
*
United States United States



« Reply #10 on: February 27, 2017, 07:54:05 pm »

Thank you for the insight.
Logged
RJBowman
Zeppelin Captain
*****


« Reply #11 on: February 27, 2017, 09:50:31 pm »

One more recurring theme: steampunk fiction often makes use of characters from literary works from the period, and also actual historic figures. Classic literary characters may interact with historical figures. For example there is a series of novels in which a niece of fictional detective Sherlock Holmes teams up with a fictional niece of real life Dracula creator Bram Stoker.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.072 seconds with 16 queries.