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Author Topic: Royal Jetpack Corps Uniform  (Read 934 times)
Lord Pentecost
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« on: January 27, 2017, 08:50:54 pm »

So I am going to begin making an entirely fictional uniform for the "Royal Jetpack Corps" now this is my first venture into making anything like this so there will be a lot of questions (sorry).

I am looking to modify a set of white overalls.

The first thing I am looking for is details to make them more uniform like. What I am after are the gold braid sleeve embelishments which I have been told are called "Barndenburger" the problem is I can find anything like them by that name. The closest I have got is these http://www.fournituren4fun.eu/brandenburgers/brandenburger-goud but I can find any UK (or even English( site with anything like what I am looking for. Can anyone help?
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frances
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« Reply #1 on: January 28, 2017, 12:56:46 am »

I think you need the term 'frog'.  That is what the fastening is called.  They come in pairs and have a loop on one side and a button on the other. 

What you probably need is a lot of russia braid.  This is a double line of cord and you sew it down the middle, between the two lines.  It is designed to be able to go round sharp bends and still lie flat on the fabric.  There are patterns on the internet for Regency / Napoleonic styles that would suit you.  The most common colours are gold metallic and black silk.
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walking stick
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« Reply #2 on: January 28, 2017, 02:52:56 pm »

Frog fasteners, frogging braid e.g. https://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1?url=search-alias%3Dkitchen&field-keywords=gold+frog+fasteners
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SeVeNeVeS
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« Reply #3 on: January 28, 2017, 06:00:50 pm »

I have had previous dealings with these guys and can say very good qaulity.

They offer bespoke tailoring on their jackets.

Not sure here, but maybe shoot them an e-mail to see if they can craft a patch of your own design.

http://www.ebay.co.uk/usr/the-jacket-shop-co?rt=nc

Just a thought and the very best of luck.
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Lord Pentecost
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« Reply #4 on: February 01, 2017, 08:25:59 pm »

Thank you everyone but it wasn't the fasteners I was after, what I'm after is this

what is this called? I was speaking to someone who had bought something similar to these as a preassembled thing that just need stitching on, they said they were called either a "brandenburger" or a "brandenburg" but I searched everywhere I can think of and can't find them anywhere.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #5 on: February 01, 2017, 09:29:06 pm »

Thank you everyone but it wasn't the fasteners I was after, what I'm after is this

what is this called? I was speaking to someone who had bought something similar to these as a preassembled thing that just need stitching on, they said they were called either a "brandenburger" or a "brandenburg" but I searched everywhere I can think of and can't find them anywhere.


Probably not helpful terminology, and dissimilar usage, but in 19th century US Army lingo they are simply called "sleeve knots or braids" and were reserved for officers in the army.

Knots on cuffs were used to indicate rank when applied to outerwear such as cape/cloak coats and surtout/overcoats which lacked the usual epaulettes or shoulder boards with symbols or markings we associate with rank.  The number of parallel ropes used to make the knots indicated the rank of the officer.

http://ushist.com/indian_wars/us_military/uniforms/q-7280_m1872_overcoat-surtout_officers.shtml
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Atterton
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« Reply #6 on: February 01, 2017, 10:39:28 pm »

Keep in mind that these people will have a roaring jet engine strapped to their back, zooming through the sky at an altitude and performing daring manouvers. I would suggest going with brown trousers instead.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #7 on: February 01, 2017, 11:55:06 pm »

Keep in mind that these people will have a roaring jet engine strapped to their back, zooming through the sky at an altitude and performing daring manouvers. I would suggest going with brown trousers instead.

Closer fitting clothing is indicated. And no capes!   Grin
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Will Howard
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« Reply #8 on: February 02, 2017, 12:29:23 am »

Thank you everyone but it wasn't the fasteners I was after, what I'm after is this

what is this called? I was speaking to someone who had bought something similar to these as a preassembled thing that just need stitching on, they said they were called either a "brandenburger" or a "brandenburg" but I searched everywhere I can think of and can't find them anywhere.

During the American Civil War, similar trim on Confederate officers' uniforms was referred to as "Chicken Guts"...!
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frances
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« Reply #9 on: February 02, 2017, 01:55:00 am »

Yes regarding that pic - the spiral twiddles on the outside of the centre motif are hand-made from russia braid.  You might be lucky and find some old stock somewhere, but generally costume-makers do this by hand.  Even doing the sewing by machine there is a lot of hand-work involved i.e. it is expensive.
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Mr. Phikset
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« Reply #10 on: February 02, 2017, 04:21:27 am »

Something that you may consider doing is reinforcing the backsides of your breeches with asbestos to prevent the scorching of your lower extremities which may be otherwise in the vicinity of the hot rocket exhaust.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #11 on: February 02, 2017, 04:27:50 am »

Something that you may consider doing is reinforcing the backsides of your breeches with asbestos to prevent the scorching of your lower extremities which may be otherwise in the vicinity of the hot rocket exhaust.


You may want to take notes from jet-wingsuit pilot/inventor Yves Rossy, who has to deal with that very problem of hot exhaust. Probably the rocket nozzles have to be at some distance from the body.




« Last Edit: April 09, 2017, 04:57:06 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
steiconi
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« Reply #12 on: February 10, 2017, 07:18:56 pm »

One name for the narrower trim is soutache.  The wider stuff might be wide soutache.
It comes straight and you make your own swirly design with it.

If you're looking for a swirly thing (by whatever name) already made, you might look at sites for Indian saris and clothing.  I used to live in a town with a large Sikh community, and the thrift store often had wonderful punjabis with fancy braidwork.
It might not look exactly military, though.
« Last Edit: February 12, 2017, 08:01:36 pm by steiconi » Logged
RJBowman
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« Reply #13 on: February 11, 2017, 01:11:13 am »

Something that you may consider doing is reinforcing the backsides of your breeches with asbestos to prevent the scorching of your lower extremities which may be otherwise in the vicinity of the hot rocket exhaust.

From what I've read of real rocket pack and jetpack pilots, this is not normally a problem. One pilot got 3rd degree burns on his legs when he fell over on the ground as the jets fired, but there is no record of burns from normal use.

The major threat of injury to the pilot (besides falling) is deafness. Rocket packs put out about 130 decibels and the pilots wear ear plugs.
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Lord Pentecost
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« Reply #14 on: February 22, 2017, 10:03:28 pm »

Something that you may consider doing is reinforcing the backsides of your breeches with asbestos to prevent the scorching of your lower extremities which may be otherwise in the vicinity of the hot rocket exhaust.

From what I've read of real rocket pack and jetpack pilots, this is not normally a problem. One pilot got 3rd degree burns on his legs when he fell over on the ground as the jets fired, but there is no record of burns from normal use.

The major threat of injury to the pilot (besides falling) is deafness. Rocket packs put out about 130 decibels and the pilots wear ear plugs.

I'll just have to use a large brass ear trumpet if that becomes an issue!
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #15 on: April 09, 2017, 04:55:32 am »

Then, what about the Iron Man approach? There is this guy who (somewhat unwisely IMHO) has "turbine engine gloves" in his "Daedalus" flight suit. Basically the same tiny turbojets used by Rossy in his flying wing).

https://www.cnet.com/news/iron-man-daedulus-exoskeleton-richard-browning-red-bull-gravity/

Daedalus - Human flight using jet-engine suit
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