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Author Topic: Any experiences of gluing to polypropylene?  (Read 501 times)
cossoft
Gunner
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United Kingdom United Kingdom


« on: December 23, 2016, 06:02:31 am »

I seem to have lots of little polypropylene (PP) things lying about that I'd like to use in projects.  I have my Pritt stick in hand.  Unfortunately it's like gluing stuff to ice cubes - damn difficult.  Wikipedia suggests the obligatory surface preparation.  The suggestion of epoxy is of little use as PP parts are rarely rigid enough to not flex.  I'm hopeful that there might be some process out there but realistically, you never see a consumer item with two PP components glued together.  They're always mechanically joined, so am I thwarted?
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bicyclebuilder
Zeppelin Overlord
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Netherlands Netherlands


A.K.A. Scanner Camera Builder


« Reply #1 on: December 23, 2016, 07:41:15 am »

I work in the plumbing buisiness where we often use PP sewage pipes. As far as I know, there are no glues for PP. All joints are mechanically, with rubber rings bitween the joints to prevent leaking. We do use a tar-like sealant, but it is to prevent leaking not to glue.

If one wants to join PP (or PE) one should concider welding. Or transfer the shape of your component to a more glue-able material.
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The best way to learn is by personal experience.
Drew P
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


« Reply #2 on: December 23, 2016, 12:53:58 pm »

Check a site about building audio speakers.
Some speaker cones are PP and are mated up with rubber or foam surrounds and attached to a fiberglass or similar former by utilizing glues only, no mechanical connection.
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Never ask 'Why?'
Always ask 'Why not!?'
cossoft
Gunner
**
United Kingdom United Kingdom


« Reply #3 on: December 23, 2016, 02:05:46 pm »

Or transfer the shape of your component to a more glue-able material.

Oh it's not that these parts are interesting.  They're junk (lids and things), it's just that they're lying around and would be convenient to use, and I'm a hoarder.  I'm also very lazy and wondered if there might be some project application for them rather than for just storing screws.  And I like to glue things... 
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Hektor Plasm
Zeppelin Captain
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United Kingdom United Kingdom


All-Round Oddfellow.


WWW
« Reply #4 on: December 24, 2016, 02:46:58 pm »

There is this:-


A little expensive, but handy for such tricky plastics.

HP
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"all die! o, the embarrassment."
H Plasm Esq. ICUE    Avatar by and with kind permission of Dr Geof. Ta!!

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steiconi
Gunner
**
United States Minor Outlying Islands United States Minor Outlying Islands



« Reply #5 on: December 25, 2016, 08:34:32 pm »

I use silicone glue/caulk for lots of projects.  It will stick a while on plastic lids, but you'd have to gouge out a rough surface if you want it to last.
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cossoft
Gunner
**
United Kingdom United Kingdom


« Reply #6 on: December 31, 2016, 01:55:19 am »

I've just used up the one hot glue stick I got for Christmas, trying it on coffee jar lids.  It seems to work reasonably, especially if you roughen the surface and use a lot of the really hot type of glue.  I guess that at 200oC it's a kinda welding...  I think that the shear strength is quite high, but not really sure of the tensile /pull off strength.
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Ravenson
Officer
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United States United States


« Reply #7 on: December 31, 2016, 06:18:06 pm »

Ok  I used a lot of Polypor when I worked in the PolyPro lab and we never found any glue that would really hold including the ones that use a pre glue.  Now we where making medical braces so it really needed it hold.   Now you can "plastic weld" polypro  but even that does not have a long life.  So I would use cold connections if you can.
JJ
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