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Author Topic: 1915 pattern - steampunk potential?  (Read 516 times)
Thylacinus
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United States United States



« on: December 11, 2016, 08:47:16 pm »

I have been exploring ladies' clothing styles from about 1912-1917, and this 1915 pattern from Ageless Patterns caught my eye. It's a dress made from homespun with an organdy chemisette (that's the faux shirt thingy). The eventual outfit would have accessories such as a derby and goggles, a double-buckled leather belt, and possibly military-style spats. My question is whether this looks like steampunk to other people?

My period is on the late side of steampunk, and I'm trying to keep the effect recognizable as steampunk *without* me needing to explain what it is I'm trying to do. I don't think it's reasonable to expect other people to read my mind or listen to a history lecture.





Source: https://www.agelesspatterns.com/1915__2.htm

(I think the extra arm at the bottom of the dress must have come loose from its owner when the image was cut out.)
« Last Edit: December 12, 2016, 01:45:17 am by Thylacinus » Logged
Banfili
Zeppelin Captain
*****
Australia Australia



« Reply #1 on: December 11, 2016, 09:04:15 pm »

Lots of potential there - good find!
It is quite high waisted, isn't it, sort of mid-way between the bust & the hips. Could be modified to be a two piece, skirt & jacket?
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Miranda.T
Zeppelin Captain
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United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #2 on: December 11, 2016, 11:59:04 pm »

I don't see why this shouldn't work with the accessories setting the Steampunk tone; with suitable choice of bag, hat and shoes, plus plenty of brass and copper, there should be no doubt about its steaminess. Certainly the design is very evocative of the period, so the era is established immediately (with it being made from appropriate materials, of course). As progress allows, please do show the outcomes of this.

Yours,
Miranda.
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walking stick
Zeppelin Admiral
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England England


« Reply #3 on: December 12, 2016, 07:41:30 am »

Steampunk and The Great War, also known as The War To End All Wars has been done quite successfully so a 1915 pattern seems entirely reasonable as a base for an outfit. There's a Torchwood episode that takes place partly during that war which might be useful as well.
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Thylacinus
Gunner
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United States United States



« Reply #4 on: December 12, 2016, 04:46:12 pm »

Steampunk and The Great War, also known as The War To End All Wars has been done quite successfully so a 1915 pattern seems entirely reasonable as a base for an outfit. There's a Torchwood episode that takes place partly during that war which might be useful as well.

Thank you for the Torchwood reference. My main inspiration is Scott Westerfeld's Leviathan trilogy, set in an alternate WWI. I haven't seen any other examples of 1912-1917 steampunk, and feel as though I'm trying to work this all out on my own.
« Last Edit: December 12, 2016, 07:28:40 pm by Thylacinus » Logged
Cora Courcelle
Snr. Officer
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England England



« Reply #5 on: December 12, 2016, 05:28:33 pm »

I really like this pattern and think it has great steampunk potential; lots of brass and copper, as Miranda suggests.
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You have to tread a fine line between avant-garde surrealism and getting yourself sectioned...
steiconi
Gunner
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United States Minor Outlying Islands United States Minor Outlying Islands



« Reply #6 on: December 12, 2016, 06:29:13 pm »

I love the bodice, could see lots of steampunk mods that would work with it, especially with the tab closures and pockets.
But the skirt seems too soft and flowy.  Maybe use a gored pattern and a stiffer, sturdier fabric to give it a more utilitarian look.  A split riding skirt might be nice, if it fits with your persona.
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Thylacinus
Gunner
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United States United States



« Reply #7 on: December 12, 2016, 07:24:57 pm »

Could be modified to be a two piece, skirt & jacket?


... But the skirt seems too soft and flowy.  Maybe use a gored pattern and a stiffer, sturdier fabric to give it a more utilitarian look.  A split riding skirt might be nice, if it fits with your persona.

Hmm. I usually wear a sturdy brown A-line microsuede skirt as my "base." It would be a lot easier to make the upper part of this pattern as a tunic to wear over my existing skirt than to incorporate a new skirt into a dress. (If you look at patterns from the period, there's a *lot* going on at the waistband to combine the multiple layers of the dresses, not to mention all of the fasteners.)

I've ordered the pattern so I'll be able to look at it and see how it all fits together.

A split riding skirt is a terrific idea, just not for me because I'm short and stout. It would be great on someone else.
« Last Edit: December 12, 2016, 11:35:02 pm by Thylacinus » Logged
Crescat Scientia
Zeppelin Captain
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United States United States


Fabricator and temporally confused.


« Reply #8 on: December 13, 2016, 04:15:26 am »

1915 was right in the middle of a paradigm shift in how ladies' garments were constructed.  As a result, dresses of that time have a surprising confusion in how they are fastened.

Earlier Victorian-Edwardian gowns were fairly simple in how they fastened (although the number of separate layers could be excessive), usually a straightforward combination of buttons and hooks and eyes.

Later 1920s frocks were a triumph of the rational dress movement, largely simple pullover styles hanging from the shoulders.

But around 1915 dresses were still layered, sometimes with transparent effects, and surprisingly fiddly in how the various layers lined up and fastened.  They seem to have made some use of press-studs (snaps) as well as hooks and eyes, stay tapes at the waist, etc.
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-- Cole Porter

That's not sinister at all.
-- Old family saying
steiconi
Gunner
**
United States Minor Outlying Islands United States Minor Outlying Islands



« Reply #9 on: December 13, 2016, 07:26:14 pm »

I kind of assumed it was a 2-piece outfit, or could be built as one.  Would give you lots more options if you could combine the tunic with different skirts or even trousers.  The brown A-line sounds perfect.
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