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Author Topic: the international cake and cookie thread.  (Read 710 times)
Caledonian
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« on: October 31, 2016, 06:13:29 pm »

This is a thread for showing delicious deserts(i always mess up that word so correct me if its just sand like this) from around the world.

Posting recipes is optional, but highly encouraged
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« Reply #1 on: October 31, 2016, 09:53:44 pm »

This is a thread for showing delicious deserts(i always mess up that word so correct me if its just sand like this) from around the world.

Posting recipes is optional, but highly encouraged

It's 'desserts,' actually. My Grade 3 teacher told us to remember that "there are more 's'es in the one you want more of."
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« Reply #2 on: November 01, 2016, 04:15:43 am »

Who cares about spelling? Where are the goodies?
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #3 on: November 01, 2016, 06:35:45 am »

Only cakes and cookies? When looking at traditional biscuits/cookies, you will find that the line between pastry and cookie is very fine indeed!  Many of Mexico's cookies are by definition pastries or variations on bread.

One classical example is the recipe for French Palmieres which were brought to Mexico by the French and are know as Orejas ("Ears") in Mexico. Technically a twice cooked puff pastry,



Which is the same kind of dough used for the Austrian Kipfrl / French Crosissant - and which was brought to Mexico in the 1860s by the Austrian Prince (Later Mexican Emperor) Maximilian and his Belgian wife Carlotta, well before the Croissant was even "a thing" in Paris (c. 1890). In Mexico they are known as Cuernos ("Horns").

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Croissant



What about pancakes? Pancakes are one of the oldest known prepared foods. According to Wiki, "archaeological evidence suggests that pancakes are probably the earliest and most widespread cereal food eaten in prehistoric societies," which makes the pancake a truly global dessert:

On this side of the pond, Europeans brought pancakes to the United States and Mexico. Technically a griddle/pan-cake, I knew that the French brought Crêpes to Mexico sometime in the middle of the 19th. C (or possibly also during Maximilian Empire times in the 1860s). Hot Cakes or Pancakes on the other hand were brought to Mexico by the Americans as a breakfast food late in the 19th. C.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cr%C3%AApe

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pancake

In honour of the Day of the Dead (today), I should also mention Pan de Muerto ("Bread of the Dead" aka Miquiztlaxcalli in ancient Aztec tongue) which is a traditional Mexican pastry, used as offering to the dearly departed family member upon an altar. Traditional Native Mesoamerican belief has it that on a certain time of the year, the barrier betweet the world of the dead and the living breaks down, allowing dead family member's spirits to visit their relatives. The food  is placed upon an altar at home inviting the dead family member to enjoy the foods he or she once enjoyed in life.  

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pan_de_muerto

« Last Edit: November 01, 2016, 07:00:09 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged

Will Howard
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« Reply #4 on: November 02, 2016, 06:21:14 pm »

This is a thread for showing delicious deserts(i always mess up that word so correct me if its just sand like this) from around the world.

Posting recipes is optional, but highly encouraged

Sand?  That's not sand, it's powdered sugar & cinnamon!
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« Reply #5 on: November 03, 2016, 05:31:43 am »

All I can say at least you didn't ask about "pies & puddings from the UK" as that is a total minefield straight from the start!.  Shocked
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« Reply #6 on: December 18, 2016, 02:36:49 am »

One of the smells and tastes of growing up in the Lehigh Valley area of Pennsylvania was the baking of kiffles during the Christmas season.  The kiffle has it's origins in those areas of the Austro-Hungarian empire under Hungarian rule; I've seen Hungarian, Slovakian, and Polish versions of them.  My mom's recipe was handed down from my grandmother and is a cream cheese/butter/egg yolk/flour dough, rolled out and filled with a walnut/egg white mixture.  The fillings vary, I've had apricot and lekvar (prune) fillings.  As my mother's ability to bake decreased with age, the role of kiffle baker has fallen on me. 
Last week was kiffle baking time in the Jones household.



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morozow
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« Reply #7 on: December 20, 2016, 03:22:48 pm »

Pastila (up to beginning of XX century wrote - "fasting", that is, that have spread out, this was due to the technique of making marshmallows) — sweet dish of Russian cuisine (known since the XIV century, that is, refers to the ancient kitchen).

If it is short. This baked applesauce.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pastila

Traditional Pastila



Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Industrial Pastila



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Sorry for the errors, rudeness and stupidity. It's not me, this online translator. Really convenient?
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